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StewieGriffin 04-04-2013 10:28 AM

First Alert Carbon Monoxide Alarm w/ Battery Backup (CO605) $21 or 2 for $36
 
65531 Attachment(s)
First Alert CO605 Carbon Monoxide Plug-In Alarm w/ Battery Backup [firstalertstore.com]

50% off one or BOGO FREE

Add to cart and change quantity to: 2

At checkout, apply code: Umbrella1

Total: $29.99 + $5.95 shipping = $35.94

Decent reviews [amazon.com] and typically $25-30 for one elsewhere [homedepot.com].

iconian 04-04-2013 10:28 AM

First Alert Carbon Monoxide Alarm w/ Battery Backup (CO605) $21 or 2 for $36
 
2 Attachment(s)
First Alert is offering their Carbon Monoxide Alarm w/ Battery Backup (CO605) for $30 - 50% with coupon code Umbrella1 = $15. Shipping is $5.95. Thanks StewieGriffin

Note, if you purchase two units, shipping will be the same, so total price is $36 for both.

Price Research: Our research indicates that First Alert Carbon Monoxide Alarm w/ Battery Backup (CO605) is $7 lower (25% savings) than the next best available price from a reputable merchant with prices starting from $28. - iconian

wikipost 04-04-2013 10:28 AM

This post can and should be edited by users like you :)
 
1 Attachment(s)
Back in Stock.

Please check your state, you may be required by law to have Carbon Monoxide detectors.

Carbon Monoxide Detectors State Statutes
http://www.ncsl.org/issues-resear...tutes.aspx


http://www.sccfd.org/pub_ed/co_alarm_law.html

California requires Carbon Monoxide Alarms for dwelling units intended for human occupancy with a fuel burning appliance, fireplace or attached garage.

Effective date of this law is January 1, 2011 for new construction, July 1, 2011 for existing single family dwellings and January 1, 2013 for multi-family dwellings and buildings such as apartments and hotels.


Sources of Carbon Monoxide

Unvented kerosene and gas space heaters; leaking chimneys and furnaces; back-drafting from furnaces, gas water heaters, wood stoves, and fireplaces; gas stoves; generators and other gasoline powered equipment; automobile exhaust from attached garages; and tobacco smoke. Incomplete oxidation during combustion in gas ranges and unvented gas or kerosene heaters may cause high concentrations of CO in indoor air. Worn or poorly adjusted and maintained combustion devices (e.g., boilers, furnaces) can be significant sources, or if the flue is improperly sized, blocked, disconnected, or is leaking. Auto, truck, or bus exhaust from attached garages, nearby roads, or parking areas can also be a source.

Steps to Reduce Exposure to Carbon Monoxide

It is most important to be sure combustion equipment is maintained and properly adjusted. Vehicular use should be carefully managed adjacent to buildings and in vocational programs. Additional ventilation can be used as a temporary measure when high levels of CO are expected for short periods of time.

ALERT: Put generators outside.
Never use a generator inside homes, garages, crawlspaces, sheds, or similar areas. Deadly levels of carbon monoxide can quickly build up in these areas and can linger for hours, even after the generator has shut off.
  • Keep gas appliances properly adjusted.
  • Consider purchasing a vented space heater when replacing an unvented one.
  • Use proper fuel in kerosene space heaters.
  • Install and use an exhaust fan vented to outdoors over gas stoves.
  • Open flues when fireplaces are in use.
  • Choose properly sized wood stoves that are certified to meet EPA emission standards. Make certain that doors on all wood stoves fit tightly.
  • Have a trained professional inspect, clean, and tune-up central heating system (furnaces, flues, and chimneys) annually. Repair any leaks promptly.
  • Do not idle the car inside garage.
Source: EPA.gov

===================================

PLEASE NOTE: The efficiency of the model as a CO detector is being questioned.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8YP9CWek5I

nice digital one on amazon just $29.99 [amazon.com]


============================

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TofuVic 04-04-2013 10:37 AM

I don't think I knew such a product existed until this year when I moved into a new residence and this came by default. In what scenarios would something like this be useful?

Thanks,
Tofu Vic

fyrusher 04-04-2013 10:43 AM

Deleted

StewieGriffin 04-04-2013 10:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TofuVic (Post 58662488)
I don't think I knew such a product existed until this year when I moved into a new residence and this came by default. In what scenarios would something like this be useful?

Thanks,
Tofu Vic

A carbon monoxide detector or CO detector is a device that detects the presence of the carbon monoxide (CO) gas in order to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning.

Carbon monoxide poisoning is the most common type of fatal air poisoning in many countries. Carbon monoxide is colourless, odorless, and tasteless, but highly toxic.

Recent news [cnn.com]...not that a detector would have helped in that case, but you get the idea of the toxicity.

Stryder5 04-04-2013 10:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TofuVic (Post 58662488)
I don't think I knew such a product existed until this year when I moved into a new residence and this came by default. In what scenarios would something like this be useful?

Thanks,
Tofu Vic

It's in the product description ;)
http://www.amazon.com/First-Alert...roduct_top

StewieGriffin 04-04-2013 10:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fyrusher (Post 58662680)
Lowes has it everyday price at $17.78

False. Lowes has it for $25.87 + tax + shipping Link [lowes.com]

scheister 04-04-2013 10:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fyrusher (Post 58662680)
Lowes has it everyday price at $17.78

That's the battery only version, the plug-in battery back-up in the OP is $25.87 at Lowes.

fyrusher 04-04-2013 10:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by StewieGriffin (Post 58662816)
False. Link [lowes.com]

Overlooked that it is a Plugin version from OP

TofuVic 04-04-2013 10:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stryder5 (Post 58662810)
It's in the product description ;)
http://www.amazon.com/First-Alert...roduct_top

Amazon didn't load for me earlier for some reason (I'm sure it was on my end), so I couldn't read it... haha.

Quote:

Originally Posted by StewieGriffin (Post 58662772)
Can't tell if you are serious or not...?

A carbon monoxide detector or CO detector is a device that detects the presence of the carbon monoxide (CO) gas in order to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning.

Carbon monoxide poisoning is the most common type of fatal air poisoning in many countries. Carbon monoxide is colourless, odorless, and tasteless, but highly toxic.

Recent news [cnn.com]...not that a detector would have helped, but you get the idea of the toxicity.

I'm serious, sadly. I know what carbon monoxide poisoning is and its dangers, but I really did not know people had detectors in their residences to detect carbon monoxide. I've never seen it in any of my apartments, schools, or work places.

Tofu Vic

Yout 04-04-2013 10:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TofuVic (Post 58662488)
I don't think I knew such a product existed until this year when I moved into a new residence and this came by default. In what scenarios would something like this be useful?

Thanks,
Tofu Vic

Carbon Monoxide can spread throughout your house or apartment building from something as simple as a blocked or leaking vent from a heating unit. You cannot smell CO and the first signs are feeling ill. If this occurs at night, you may not wake up again. If you don't have a detector, you should buy one (or more) for sure. Place them in the bedrooms or just outside of bedrooms in the hallway. A combination CO and smoke detector is a much better option though. A battery unit is easier to mount in the hallway between two or more bedroom areas, plugs seem to be hard to find in this area.

For two CO detectors, it's a good deal.

And FYI, check the manufacture date on the back of your CO detectors if you have them. They should be replaced every 5-7 years. Just because the electronics work when you press the test button, that does not mean the CO sensor inside the unit is functioning.

TofuVic 04-04-2013 10:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yout (Post 58662996)
Carbon Monoxide can spread throughout your house or apartment building from something as simple as a blocked or leaking vent from a heating unit. You cannot smell CO and the first signs are feeling ill. If this occurs at night, you may not wake up again. If you don't have a detector, you should buy one (or more) for sure. Place them in the bedrooms or just outside of bedrooms in the hallway. A battery unit is easier to mount in the hallway between two or more bedroom areas, plugs seem to be hard to find in this area.

I'm not seeing a deal for two detectors, but if it's for two, it's a good deal. If it's for one, not so much...

And FYI, check the manufacture date on the back of your CO detectors if you have them. They should be replaced every 5-7 years. Just because the electronics work when you press the test button, that does not mean the CO sensor inside the unit is functioning.

Thank you for this information and possibly saving my life.

I've given you non-life saving reputation points,
Tofu Vic

StewieGriffin 04-04-2013 10:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yout (Post 58662996)
Carbon Monoxide can spread throughout your house or apartment building from something as simple as a blocked or leaking vent from a heating unit. You cannot smell CO and the first signs are feeling ill. If this occurs at night, you may not wake up again. If you don't have a detector, you should buy one (or more) for sure. Place them in the bedrooms or just outside of bedrooms in the hallway. A battery unit is easier to mount in the hallway between two or more bedroom areas, plugs seem to be hard to find in this area.

I'm not seeing a deal for two detectors, but if it's for two, it's a good deal. If it's for one, not so much...

And FYI, check the manufacture date on the back of your CO detectors if you have them. They should be replaced every 5-7 years. Just because the electronics work when you press the test button, that does not mean the CO sensor inside the unit is functioning.

You have to add two to your cart, then add the coupon code as you proceed through checkout. The coupon code will deduct $29.99, essentially making it BOGO FREE plus shipping.

Yout 04-04-2013 11:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TofuVic (Post 58663060)
Thank you for this information and possibly saving my life.

I've given you non-life saving reputation points,
Tofu Vic

No problem, but I edited one line into the reply:

A combination CO and smoke detector is a much better option though.

Quote:

Originally Posted by StewieGriffin (Post 58663104)
You have to add two to your cart, then add the coupon code as you proceed through checkout. The coupon code will deduct $29.99, essentially making it BOGO FREE plus shipping.

You're right, two for 29.99, good price. (Repped you)

StewieGriffin 04-04-2013 11:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yout (Post 58663136)
No problem, but I edited one line into the reply:

A combination CO and smoke detector is a much better option though.

You're right, two for 29.99, good price.

I agree about combo detectors being better options. However, my house is already hard wired with smoke detectors and I just needed the CO...

(Repped you for providing great info on the importance of everyone having these in their homes!)

moi 04-04-2013 11:25 AM

good deal - just bought a similar one at costco for $28

scheister 04-04-2013 11:28 AM

One of the Amazon reviews made me curious, so I'll share.

Specs for this unit:
The CO sensor is adjusted not to detect CO levels below 30 PPM and will not alarm when exposed to constant levels of 30 PPM for 30 days. It will alarm at the following levels: 400 PPM CO between 4 and 15 minutes, 150 PPM CO between 10 and 50 minutes and 70 PPM CO between 60 and 240 minutes.

According to Wikipedia:
Concentration Symptoms
35 ppm Headache and dizziness within six to eight hours of constant exposure
100 ppm Slight headache in two to three hours
200 ppm Slight headache within two to three hours; loss of judgment
400 ppm Frontal headache within one to two hours
800 ppm Dizziness, nausea, and convulsions within 45 min; insensible within 2 hours
1,600 ppm Headache, tachycardia, dizziness, and nausea within 20 min; death in less than 2 hours
.
.
.

GMY 04-04-2013 11:28 AM

Thanks OP. Replace the old ones with these.

Hose 04-04-2013 11:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TofuVic (Post 58662488)
"... In what scenarios would something like this be useful?

Tennis star Vitas Gerulaitis died from carbon monoxide poisoning... as did my father.

microkelvin 04-04-2013 11:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TofuVic (Post 58662488)
I don't think I knew such a product existed until this year when I moved into a new residence and this came by default. In what scenarios would something like this be useful?

Thanks,
Tofu Vic

Quote:

Originally Posted by StewieGriffin (Post 58662772)
Can't tell if you are serious or not...?

A carbon monoxide detector or CO detector is a device that detects the presence of the carbon monoxide (CO) gas in order to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning.

Carbon monoxide poisoning is the most common type of fatal air poisoning in many countries. Carbon monoxide is colourless, odorless, and tasteless, but highly toxic.

Recent news [cnn.com]...not that a detector would have helped in that case, but you get the idea of the toxicity.

i got the same question earlier until somebody cleared that for me.
they said if i dont have gas pipe or using any natual gas, then i dont have to worry about it.

i know CO gas is dangerous. but i want to know where it's from, how it happens, to prevent it. "in many countries" phrase is just a scare tactic commercial. if it happens around the world, USA is only 1 country among the long list. they will love to use it if this danger is for most of 3rd world countries. i can claim that there are more lottery winners than people who died from CO poisoning.

cookiemonster 04-04-2013 11:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hose (Post 58664142)
Tennis star Vitas Gerulaitis died from carbon monoxide poisoning... as did my father.

As did both of "Weird Al" Yankovic's parents.
Quote:

Originally Posted by moi (Post 58663794)
good deal - just bought a similar one at costco for $28

I just bought one a few weeks ago from Costco for $19 or $20.

Hose 04-04-2013 11:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by microkelvin (Post 58664380)
"... but i want to know where it's from, how it happens, to prevent it.

Carbon monoxide is a by-product of incomplete hydrocarbon combustion. Any enclosed space where CO might accumulate is a potential risk... gas/oil furnace, garage, fuel-burning space heater...

meetyburger 04-04-2013 11:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TofuVic (Post 58662976)
Amazon didn't load for me earlier for some reason (I'm sure it was on my end), so I couldn't read it... haha.


I'm serious, sadly. I know what carbon monoxide poisoning is and its dangers, but I really did not know people had detectors in their residences to detect carbon monoxide. I've never seen it in any of my apartments, schools, or work places.

Tofu Vic

In California, it's the law.

http://osfm.fire.ca.gov/strucfire...noxide.pdf

StewieGriffin 04-04-2013 11:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by microkelvin (Post 58664380)
i got the same question earlier until somebody cleared that for me.
they said if i dont have gas pipe or using any natual gas, then i dont have to worry about it.

i know CO gas is dangerous. but i want to know where it's from, how it happens, to prevent it. "in many countries" phrase is just a scare tactic commercial. if it happens around the world, USA is only 1 country among the long list. they will love to use it if this danger is for most of 3rd world countries. i can claim that there are more lottery winners than people who died from CO poisoning.

Sources of Carbon Monoxide

Unvented kerosene and gas space heaters; leaking chimneys and furnaces; back-drafting from furnaces, gas water heaters, wood stoves, and fireplaces; gas stoves; generators and other gasoline powered equipment; automobile exhaust from attached garages; and tobacco smoke. Incomplete oxidation during combustion in gas ranges and unvented gas or kerosene heaters may cause high concentrations of CO in indoor air. Worn or poorly adjusted and maintained combustion devices (e.g., boilers, furnaces) can be significant sources, or if the flue is improperly sized, blocked, disconnected, or is leaking. Auto, truck, or bus exhaust from attached garages, nearby roads, or parking areas can also be a source.

Steps to Reduce Exposure to Carbon Monoxide

It is most important to be sure combustion equipment is maintained and properly adjusted. Vehicular use should be carefully managed adjacent to buildings and in vocational programs. Additional ventilation can be used as a temporary measure when high levels of CO are expected for short periods of time.

ALERT: Put generators outside.
Never use a generator inside homes, garages, crawlspaces, sheds, or similar areas. Deadly levels of carbon monoxide can quickly build up in these areas and can linger for hours, even after the generator has shut off.
  • Keep gas appliances properly adjusted.
  • Consider purchasing a vented space heater when replacing an unvented one.
  • Use proper fuel in kerosene space heaters.
  • Install and use an exhaust fan vented to outdoors over gas stoves.
  • Open flues when fireplaces are in use.
  • Choose properly sized wood stoves that are certified to meet EPA emission standards. Make certain that doors on all wood stoves fit tightly.
  • Have a trained professional inspect, clean, and tune-up central heating system (furnaces, flues, and chimneys) annually. Repair any leaks promptly.
  • Do not idle the car inside garage.
Sources: EPA.gov

ape 04-04-2013 11:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by scheister (Post 58663902)
One of the Amazon reviews made me curious, so I'll share.


35 ppm Headache and dizziness within six to eight hours of constant exposure
100 ppm Slight headache in two to three hours
200 ppm Slight headache within two to three hours; loss of judgment
400 ppm Frontal headache within one to two hours
800 ppm Dizziness, nausea, and convulsions within 45 min; insensible within 2 hours
1,600 ppm Headache, tachycardia, dizziness, and nausea within 20 min; death in less than 2 hours
.
.
.


Apparently you met my ex-wife???

iam25boy 04-04-2013 11:56 AM

in for 1.. good deal.. have been looking for decent CO detector. thanks!!

meetyburger 04-04-2013 11:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by microkelvin (Post 58664380)
i got the same question earlier until somebody cleared that for me.
they said if i dont have gas pipe or using any natual gas, then i dont have to worry about it.

i know CO gas is dangerous. but i want to know where it's from, how it happens, to prevent it. "in many countries" phrase is just a scare tactic commercial. if it happens around the world, USA is only 1 country among the long list. they will love to use it if this danger is for most of 3rd world countries. i can claim that there are more lottery winners than people who died from CO poisoning.

CO can come from your car in the garage.

TofuVic 04-04-2013 11:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by meetyburger (Post 58664566)

Thanks for the information. I guess I've just never noticed it - or may have seen it but did not know what it was.

Great, now I'm going to be looking for these whenever I go to public establishments.

Tofu Vic

MozartA 04-04-2013 11:58 AM

And state like California has new law that require Carbon Monoxide Alarms.

http://www.sccfd.org/pub_ed/co_alarm_law.html

California requires Carbon Monoxide Alarms for dwelling units intended for human occupancy with a fuel burning appliance, fireplace or attached garage.

Effective date of this law is January 1, 2011 for new construction, July 1, 2011 for existing single family dwellings and January 1, 2013 for multi-family dwellings and buildings such as apartments and hotels.

I am sure other states have similar new law.


Carbon Monoxide Detectors State Statutes
http://www.ncsl.org/issues-resear...tutes.aspx

microkelvin 04-04-2013 12:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by StewieGriffin (Post 58664598)
Sources of Carbon Monoxide

Unvented kerosene and gas space heaters; leaking chimneys and furnaces; back-drafting from furnaces, gas water heaters, wood stoves, and fireplaces; gas stoves; generators and other gasoline powered equipment; automobile exhaust from attached garages; and tobacco smoke. Incomplete oxidation during combustion in gas ranges and unvented gas or kerosene heaters may cause high concentrations of CO in indoor air. Worn or poorly adjusted and maintained combustion devices (e.g., boilers, furnaces) can be significant sources, or if the flue is improperly sized, blocked, disconnected, or is leaking. Auto, truck, or bus exhaust from attached garages, nearby roads, or parking areas can also be a source.

Steps to Reduce Exposure to Carbon Monoxide

It is most important to be sure combustion equipment is maintained and properly adjusted. Vehicular use should be carefully managed adjacent to buildings and in vocational programs. Additional ventilation can be used as a temporary measure when high levels of CO are expected for short periods of time.

ALERT: Put generators outside.
Never use a generator inside homes, garages, crawlspaces, sheds, or similar areas. Deadly levels of carbon monoxide can quickly build up in these areas and can linger for hours, even after the generator has shut off.
Keep gas appliances properly adjusted.
Consider purchasing a vented space heater when replacing an unvented one.
Use proper fuel in kerosene space heaters.
Install and use an exhaust fan vented to outdoors over gas stoves.
Open flues when fireplaces are in use.
Choose properly sized wood stoves that are certified to meet EPA emission standards. Make certain that doors on all wood stoves fit tightly.
Have a trained professional inspect, clean, and tune-up central heating system (furnaces, flues, and chimneys) annually. Repair any leaks promptly.
Do not idle the car inside garage.

Sources: EPA.gov

good to know that i dont have any CO danger.
not everyone is using natual gas.

Quote:

Originally Posted by meetyburger (Post 58664648)
CO can come from your car in the garage.

well, unless i am stupid enough to let my car idle in my garage overnight. LOL.

backspace 04-04-2013 12:03 PM

I just hate battery operated alarm.

I also need a fire alarm. So I will wait for a plugin combo.

StewieGriffin 04-04-2013 12:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by microkelvin (Post 58664730)
good to know that i dont have any CO danger.
not everyone is using natual gas.


well, unless i am stupid enough to let my car idle in my garage overnight. LOL.

How do you heat your house?

microkelvin 04-04-2013 12:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by StewieGriffin (Post 58664808)
How do you heat your house?

you assume everyone is living up north? i dont think anyone needs a heater in southern cal.

StewieGriffin 04-04-2013 12:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by backspace (Post 58664798)
I need a plug in combo. I just hate battery operated alarm.

This unit IS a plug-in unit...

Quote:

Originally Posted by microkelvin (Post 58664854)
you assume everyone is living up north? i dont think anyone needs a heater in southern cal.

No assumption. Just asking...

TFSJake 04-04-2013 12:18 PM

Shain Gandee could have used one of these...

tooslow 04-04-2013 12:20 PM

CHEAP insurance.
I have one in my house and one in my office.
CHEAP insurance.
Both AC powered with battery back-up.

It seems the nature of insurance is:
"If you have it, you won't need it; if you don't have it.... you WILL need it!"

meetyburger 04-04-2013 12:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by microkelvin (Post 58664730)
good to know that i dont have any CO danger.
not everyone is using natual gas.


well, unless i am stupid enough to let my car idle in my garage overnight. LOL.

Fair enough, but don't forget the water heater and possibly furnace assuming your don't use gas for anything else.

MozartA 04-04-2013 12:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by microkelvin (Post 58664730)
well, unless i am stupid enough to let my car idle in my garage overnight. LOL.

Quote:

Originally Posted by microkelvin (Post 58664854)
you assume everyone is living up north? i dont think anyone needs a heater in southern cal.

Actually in California, it is required by law to have Carbon Monoxide detector installed.

http://www.sccfd.org/pub_ed/co_alarm_law.html

Senate Bill 183 in California requires Carbon Monoxide Alarms for dwelling units intended for human occupancy with a fuel burning appliance, fireplace or attached garage.

I assume that would also apply to gas hot water heater/dryer, etc.

Many other states have similar laws

microkelvin 04-04-2013 12:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by meetyburger (Post 58665304)
Fair enough, but don't forget the water heater and possibly furnace assuming your don't use gas for anything else.

again, not eveyone is using natual gas. water heater can use electricity.

Quote:

Originally Posted by MozartA (Post 58665342)
Actually in California, it is required by law to have Carbon Monoxide detector installed.

http://www.sccfd.org/pub_ed/co_alarm_law.html

Senate Bill 183 in California requires Carbon Monoxide Alarms for dwelling units intended for human occupancy with a fuel burning appliance, fireplace or attached garage.

I assume that would also apply to gas hot water heater/dryer, etc.

Many other states have similar laws

again, you guys are living up north and assuming the rest of the nation are the same.

chemdude 04-04-2013 12:28 PM

I am still getting $5.95 for shipping, how are you all getting free shipping?

MozartA 04-04-2013 12:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by microkelvin (Post 58665352)
again, not eveyone is using natual gas. water heater can use electricity.


again, you guys are living up north and assuming the rest of the nation are the same.

No one said this is required for everyone. Just saying there are law (in multiple states) that require it based on what you have.
And not sure why mentioned north since you can have attached garage (gas powered generator, dryer, etc) anywhere in US right? :) May be you are confusing my post with someone else? :)

meetyburger 04-04-2013 12:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chemdude (Post 58665384)
I am still getting $5.95 for shipping, how are you all getting free shipping?

Total: $29.99 + $5.95 shipping = $35.94

No free shipping that I'm aware of.

bjoyful 04-04-2013 12:41 PM

Makes sense to me. In 4 2. Thanks OP!

SAN_MARINO 04-04-2013 12:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by moi (Post 58663794)
good deal - just bought a similar one at costco for $28

$28 for 2 or 1? Thanks!

cmaconsulting 04-04-2013 12:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by StewieGriffin (Post 58662772)
Carbon monoxide is colourless, odorless, and tasteless, but highly toxic.

Sounds just like Iocane Powder. Thankfully, I've spent the last 5 years building up an immunity to it.

StewieGriffin 04-04-2013 12:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cmaconsulting (Post 58665824)
Sounds just like Iocane Powder. Thankfully, I've spent the last 5 years building up an immunity to it.

Repped for Princess Bride reference. :shake:

BrianC811 04-04-2013 01:10 PM

I have two problems with this brand:

1) The "beep" noise is identical to their regular fire alarms when the battery goes dead, so you can't tell which direction that it's coming from and you don't know if it's the fire alarm vs CO detector and with it being plugged in to the wall, older models didn't state that the battery was going dead only that the unit was functioning.

2) Inferior build quality. I bought multiple of the same unit and one ate batteries until it stopped working all together, and another one by the garage that I knew should have gone off multiple times didn't.

I hope other people's luck are better, but when it's a relatively simple device that they are charging this much more that supposed to save your life, I'd hope that they'd have a little bit better production standards than what I've experienced.

StewieGriffin 04-04-2013 01:15 PM

Woohoo! FP! :woot:

ak78 04-04-2013 01:17 PM

Thanks, its a great deal. I tried to buy the hardwired CO2/Smoke combo and was hoping the code would still work, unfortunately the code only applies to the specific listed CO2 detector.

fuzzyfacedog 04-04-2013 01:24 PM

Nice price. Time to replace my older ones, as the sensors become neutralized over years.

xpeng 04-04-2013 01:28 PM

In for some

BiscuitHead 04-04-2013 01:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cmaconsulting (Post 58665824)
Sounds just like Iocane Powder. Thankfully, I've spent the last 5 years building up an immunity to it.

Inconceivable...

carlfxy 04-04-2013 01:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ak78 (Post 58666458)
Thanks, its a great deal. I tried to buy the hardwired CO2/Smoke combo and was hoping the code would still work, unfortunately the code only applies to the specific listed CO2 detector.


$31.67 on amazon [amazon.com]

personally, I like this digital co2 detector for $29.99 on amazon [amazon.com] Also, someone posted in the comments that this was rated #1 by Consumer Report,

MPoWeRM3 04-04-2013 01:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by StewieGriffin (Post 58666422)
Woohoo! FP! :woot:

couple bucks cheaper than amazon, but yeah FP. :D

tiga2009 04-04-2013 01:49 PM

In case others have the same question, found the answer before I asked here:

"The location for effective performance is not generally dependent on mounting height. The density of carbon monoxide is similar to that of air at room temperature, and carbon monoxide generally mixes readily with air."

Pascal 04-04-2013 01:52 PM

Don't waste your money. There are a lot of alarms out there that have many more features for not much more money.

When I was looking for alarms for my house I created a spreadsheet comparing them. I posted it for all to see at http://www.alarmspecs.com/

toofazt 04-04-2013 01:54 PM

$23 at Amazon- http://www.amazon.com/First-Alert...ert-CO600-

StewieGriffin 04-04-2013 01:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by toofazt (Post 58667402)

Wrong model

Just noticed: ‚óŹ 2 AA batteries included.

Much better than 9v IMO. I tend to always have AAs on hand...9v not so much.

slickabc123 04-04-2013 02:00 PM

I now avoid any these with a battery backup, after 3 years my first alert ate 9v batteries until it beeped low alarm after only 5 minutes...not worth having an alarm if you unplug it because it's beeping from a false low battery alarm.

weedrose 04-04-2013 02:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TofuVic (Post 58662488)
I don't think I knew such a product existed until this year when I moved into a new residence and this came by default. In what scenarios would something like this be useful?

Thanks,
Tofu Vic

my future son in law is a firefighter a few cities away. he (and the department) responded to a home with a probable CO2 issue. When they got there, the house was locked up, garage doors closed. Police let them in (they were there on a 'well check' call from a concerned friend who hadn't heard from the occupants and they missed work that day). The CO2 levels in the house were off the charts. Upon entering the home, they found the male occupant dead in the bathroom, fully dressed for work. His spouse was in bed, also deceased. The cause of the CO2... his car starter on his key chain was activated in his pocket. He was unaware that the car had started in the attached garage; it was still running when the fire department got there.... they didn't have a chance... apparently they didn't have one of these.

It was one of the first things we installed in our home 15 years ago... ours is part of the fire detector. It must be time for a new one. My future son in law says to replace after 5 years.

and that's one reason why you need one of these. faulty chimney, faulty furnace, among other reasons. without an alarm, by the time there's an issue, it's probably too late.

TofuVic 04-04-2013 02:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by weedrose (Post 58667910)
my future son in law is a firefighter a few cities away. he (and the department) responded to a home with a probable CO2 issue. When they got there, the house was locked up, garage doors closed. Police let them in (they were there on a 'well check' call from a concerned friend who hadn't heard from the occupants and they missed work that day). The CO2 levels in the house were off the charts. Upon entering the home, they found the male occupant dead in the bathroom, fully dressed for work. His spouse was in bed, also deceased. The cause of the CO2... his car starter on his key chain was activated in his pocket. He was unaware that the car had started in the attached garage; it was still running when the fire department got there.... they didn't have a chance... apparently they didn't have one of these.

It was one of the first things we installed in our home 15 years ago... ours is part of the fire detector. It must be time for a new one. My future son in law says to replace after 5 years.

and that's one reason why you need one of these. faulty chimney, faulty furnace, among other reasons. without an alarm, by the time there's an issue, it's probably too late.

Thank you for the word of warning and advice. It has been taken to heart.

I know the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning - I just didn't know such a simple device existed until this year.

Tofu Vic

ak78 04-04-2013 02:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by carlfxy (Post 58666838)
$31.67 on amazon [amazon.com]

personally, I like this digital co2 detector for $29.99 on amazon [amazon.com] Also, someone posted in the comments that this was rated #1 by Consumer Report,

Thanks, That is less than what I would have paid with the code!

tiga2009 04-04-2013 02:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slickabc123 (Post 58667536)
I now avoid any these with a battery backup, after 3 years my first alert ate 9v batteries until it beeped low alarm after only 5 minutes...not worth having an alarm if you unplug it because it's beeping from a false low battery alarm.

Not sure if this is your case, but I picked this up in one of the Amazon reviews:
"You should never plug your CO monitor into an outlet that also is connected to a light switch. As soon as you turn the light off, the battery in the CO monitor will start to drain."

stasis 04-04-2013 02:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by carlfxy (Post 58666838)
$31.67 on amazon [amazon.com]

personally, I like this digital co2 detector for $29.99 on amazon [amazon.com] Also, someone posted in the comments that this was rated #1 by Consumer Report,

only $24.69 back in Feb. If you need a backup, maybe wait for amazon to lower the price again

tiga2009 04-04-2013 02:55 PM

Alright, in for 3.

For others in the same boat, with the discount, shipping & no tax (to CA), it works out to be $65.92 for 3 in 1 order, $35.94 for 2, and $20.94 for 1. So if you need 3, buy 2 and then buy 1 in separate orders.

bcmbkup 04-04-2013 03:02 PM

PLEASE NOTE: The efficiency of the model as a CO detector is being questioned.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8YP9CWek5I

Moonwalkr 04-04-2013 03:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by weedrose (Post 58667910)
my future son in law is a firefighter a few cities away. he (and the department) responded to a home with a probable CO2 issue. When they got there, the house was locked up, garage doors closed. Police let them in (they were there on a 'well check' call from a concerned friend who hadn't heard from the occupants and they missed work that day). The CO2 levels in the house were off the charts. Upon entering the home, they found the male occupant dead in the bathroom, fully dressed for work. His spouse was in bed, also deceased. The cause of the CO2... his car starter on his key chain was activated in his pocket. He was unaware that the car had started in the attached garage; it was still running when the fire department got there.... they didn't have a chance... apparently they didn't have one of these.

It was one of the first things we installed in our home 15 years ago... ours is part of the fire detector. It must be time for a new one. My future son in law says to replace after 5 years.

and that's one reason why you need one of these. faulty chimney, faulty furnace, among other reasons. without an alarm, by the time there's an issue, it's probably too late.

Not to be nit-picky, but CO2 is carbon dioxide, which we breathe in and out in abundance everyday. CO is monoxide, which basically binds to your blood cell much stronger than oxygen and very difficult to remove from your body even if you manage to get yourself to fresh air. I know the difference in having that one oxygen seems slight, but how they affect you is profound.

bcmbkup 04-04-2013 03:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yout (Post 58663136)
No problem, but I edited one line into the reply:
A combination CO and smoke detector is a much better option though.

I'm not sure about that. I would want my smoke detector up high in the ceiling and the CO detector low by the ground as the smoke tend to go up and CO tend to stay low. A combo unit may be in a awkward position in terms of where to place it.

I think tiga2009 answered the question. See below
Quote:

Originally Posted by tiga2009 (Post 58667272)
In case others have the same question, found the answer before I asked here:

"The location for effective performance is not generally dependent on mounting height. The density of carbon monoxide is similar to that of air at room temperature, and carbon monoxide generally mixes readily with air."

And thanks Yout for clarification. See below
Quote:

Originally Posted by Yout (Post 58669596)
Carbon Monoxide will not stay low. Carbon Monoxide is slightly lighter than air, and it will tend to rise along with the warmer air that created it. It's certainly not as crucial to mount it at the ceiling level when compared to a smoke detector.

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is heavier than air and will collect in low areas, but don't confuse it with Carbon Monoxide (CO).


taar44 04-04-2013 03:24 PM

Ordered a few hours back and got tracking info already. Thanks OP.

Yout 04-04-2013 03:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bcmbkup (Post 58669260)
I'm not sure about that. I would want my smoke detector up high in the ceiling and the CO detector low by the ground as the smoke tend to go up and CO tend to stay low. A combo unit may be in a awkward position in terms of where to place it.

I think tiga2009 answered the question.

Carbon Monoxide will not stay low. Carbon Monoxide is slightly lighter than air, and it will tend to rise along with the warmer air that created it. It's certainly not as crucial to mount it at the ceiling level when compared to a smoke detector.

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is heavier than air and will collect in low areas, but don't confuse it with Carbon Monoxide (CO).

bcmbkup 04-04-2013 03:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yout (Post 58669596)
Carbon Monoxide will not stay low. Carbon Monoxide is slightly lighter than air, and it will tend to rise along with the warmer air that created it. It's certainly not as crucial to mount it at the ceiling level when compared to a smoke detector.

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is heavier than air and will collect in low areas, but don't confuse it with Carbon Monoxide (CO).

Thanks for the clarification and repped :)

carlfxy 04-04-2013 03:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stasis (Post 58668766)
only $24.69 back in Feb. If you need a backup, maybe wait for amazon to lower the price again

I have a price alert set @ $25 already :)

thanks

weedrose 04-04-2013 04:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Moonwalkr (Post 58669168)
Not to be nit-picky, but CO2 is carbon dioxide, which we breathe in and out in abundance everyday. CO is monoxide, which basically binds to your blood cell much stronger than oxygen and very difficult to remove from your body even if you manage to get yourself to fresh air. I know the difference in having that one oxygen seems slight, but how they affect you is profound.

you're absolutely right. my bad. I hope everyone knew what I was talking about... ;)

GoldenRat 04-04-2013 04:12 PM

After watching the YouTube video of that KPHO Ch.5 report - I'm NOT considering buying it anymore.

stevenl 04-04-2013 04:51 PM

Forget this one.

I recommend buying the ones that have the LCD display of the PPM of CO.

cookiemonster 04-04-2013 04:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stevenl (Post 58670964)
Forget this one.

I recommend buying the ones that have the LCD display of the PPM of CO.

That's the one I was referring to that I bought at Costco for ~$20.

livingaboard 04-04-2013 05:53 PM

I'm not going through all these posts but these have a 5 year life to them and then they start beeping at you. If you have one that is 5 years or older and it isn't beeping at you then replace it anyway.

I prefer the digital readout models. I have a few in my house and one digital readout in the rv and a regular battery operated non display model.

Alkaar 04-04-2013 08:20 PM

Due to the wiki stating that it's not as sensitive as say an airplane CO detector, is this still worth buying or should I pay more for something better?

exceed19 04-04-2013 09:32 PM

Guess that guy from the MTV show "buckwild" should of had one of these installed in his truck eh?

gawd 04-05-2013 01:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by microkelvin (Post 58664854)
you assume everyone is living up north? i dont think anyone needs a heater in southern cal.

First and foremost, Southern CA is not in the Tropical Zone and it does get cold there. I'm sure 95% of residential and commercial buildings there have heaters (gas or electric). And they do get snow up in the higher elevations and have 6 ski resorts, the most notable ones are Mammoth Mountain, Bear Mountain and Mt. Baldy.

And if you have any one of the following in your home, you are required by law to have CO detectors:
1. Attached garage
2. Fireplace
3. Gas water heater
4. Gas furnace
5. Gas stove
6. Wood stove
7. Gas dryer
8. Any appliance inside the home that burns natural gas, wood or other types of burning fuel.

I'm sure that 95% of the homes in Southern CA have at least one of the above things. And with natural gas being cheaper than electricity, it makes more sense for many homes to have gas appliances. So let's not start spewing nonsensical things unless you have done your research.

poohbie 04-05-2013 01:45 AM

Is it better to have carbon monoxide detector as high up as possible (i.e. the gas rises), or does it not matter? I imagine most people with plug-in models will be having it close to the ground.

Quote:

Originally Posted by cookiemonster (Post 58671016)
That's the one I was referring to that I bought at Costco for ~$20.

Yeah, there was a $10 instant discount a couple months ago...waiting for that to come around again.

FMcamaroZ28 04-05-2013 04:49 AM

When did all alarms start using AA batteries?

I just bought a 10 pack of Lithium 9V!

StewieGriffin 04-05-2013 07:53 AM

Currently back ordered but they are still accepting orders.

mmancini_23 04-05-2013 09:11 AM

Reeped (3)

cookiemonster 04-05-2013 09:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by poohbie (Post 58677538)
Yeah, there was a $10 instant discount a couple months ago...waiting for that to come around again.

I just bought it a couple weeks ago. I haven't even opened the package, yet.

Moonwalkr 04-05-2013 09:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by poohbie (Post 58677538)
Is it better to have carbon monoxide detector as high up as possible (i.e. the gas rises), or does it not matter? I imagine most people with plug-in models will be having it close to the ground.


Yeah, there was a $10 instant discount a couple months ago...waiting for that to come around again.

CO is about the same density as air. At the source it probably rises since it's warm (combustion byproduct) but will quickly diffuse in air. So really it doesn't matter where you put the detector as long as you have it.

microkelvin 04-05-2013 11:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gawd (Post 58677516)
First and foremost, Southern CA is not in the Tropical Zone and it does get cold there. I'm sure 95% of residential and commercial buildings there have heaters (gas or electric). And they do get snow up in the higher elevations and have 6 ski resorts, the most notable ones are Mammoth Mountain, Bear Mountain and Mt. Baldy.

And if you have any one of the following in your home, you are required by law to have CO detectors:
1. Attached garage
2. Fireplace
3. Gas water heater
4. Gas furnace
5. Gas stove
6. Wood stove
7. Gas dryer
8. Any appliance inside the home that burns natural gas, wood or other types of burning fuel.

I'm sure that 95% of the homes in Southern CA have at least one of the above things. And with natural gas being cheaper than electricity, it makes more sense for many homes to have gas appliances. So let's not start spewing nonsensical things unless you have done your research.

Mammoth Mountain, Bear Mountain are not from Southern CA.
Your list is 95% of natural gas related. Again, not all people use natural gas.

Who said Southern CA doesn't get cold? of course it's cold everywhere sometimes during the year. But does it mean they will have to have fireplace or use natural gas?

It's the CA's law thing. everyone must obey. no doubt. if i live in an apartment with no garage attached and use no natural gas, does it mean i dont have to install it? it's the law that applied to the whole state.

but dont assume everyone's using natural gas.

MecroU 04-06-2013 03:55 PM

Always needed one of this.

StewieGriffin 04-13-2013 07:07 AM

Back in stock. Just ordered 2 more for the spare bedrooms.

kdt 04-13-2013 07:16 AM

got 2, thanks!

zqcolor 04-13-2013 07:36 AM

repped 2

ajay19902 04-13-2013 08:06 AM

I really want to get me one of this. Better be safe than sorry. totally worth it.

StewieGriffin 04-18-2013 12:37 PM

This Deal is still working.

I'm interested in also getting a unit with digital display.
Anyone with the CO615 model with the digital display care to comment on it? TIA


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