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Sears - Dura Power 100 FT Extension Cord 12/3 $39.99 (Online Only Price)

$39.99
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Seems like a pretty good deal on a 12/3 100ft cord. I had $6 in surprise points that made this deal even better.

http://www.sears.com/dura-power-1..._CoreTools

I did a quick search and did not see this posted. I hope you enjoy your weekend!
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$39.99

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#2
Can 12 Gauge handle 15A of current over 100 Ft.? The specs on this says only 12A, but I believe I have seen others that can handle 15A over 12 Gauge 100 Ft. I know Contractor Grade usually uses 10 Guage, but I believe 12 Gauge should be fine for 15A correct?
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Last edited by Mungo July 8, 2017 at 12:55 AM.
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#3
Quote from Mungo
:
Can 12 Gauge handle 15A of current over 100 Ft.? The specs on this says only 12A, but I believe I have seen others that can handle 15A over 12 Gauge 100 Ft. I know Contractor Grade usually uses 10 Guage, but I believe 12 Gauge should be fine for 15A correct?
12AWG is usually rated at 15A, even some 14AWG cables are rated at 15A. That 12A rating is probably an error.
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#4
Quote from Mungo
:
Can 12 Gauge handle 15A of current over 100 Ft.? The specs on this says only 12A, but I believe I have seen others that can handle 15A over 12 Gauge 100 Ft. I know Contractor Grade usually uses 10 Guage, but I believe 12 Gauge should be fine for 15A correct?
It depends on the quality of the wire and materials used (including # of cores) which I don't see stated anywhere. With the manuf listing this as 12A load, I wouldn't trust my 15A equipment on it. Especially with this length of cord, accounting for voltage drop. Would much rather buy a better cord than blow out a motor and spend hundreds (?) to replace it.

Quick reference here: http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com...d_419.html

For 15A rating, best bet is Costco (2 pack of 50' 12/3 cords for $34.99) or the Amazon deal from the other day: https://slickdeals.net/f/10320788-various-yellow-jacket-extension-cords-20-off-coupon-amazon?src=SiteSearchV2_SearchBarV2Algo1 which also lists this Sears deal along w/ various other stores' deals throughout the comments.
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Last edited by mpc11 July 8, 2017 at 04:17 AM.
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#5
Quote from mpc11
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It depends on the quality of the wire and materials used (including # of cores) which I don't see stated anywhere. With the manuf listing this as 12A load, I wouldn't trust my 15A equipment on it. Especially with this length of cord, accounting for voltage drop. Would much rather buy a better cord than blow out a motor and spend hundreds (?) to replace it.

Quick reference here: http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com...d_419.html [engineeringtoolbox.com]

For 15A rating, best bet is Costco (2 pack of 50' 12/3 cords for $34.99) or the Amazon deal from the other day: https://slickdeals.net/f/10320788-various-yellow-jacket-extension-cords-20-off-coupon-amazon?src=Sit... which also lists this Sears deal along w/ various other stores' deals throughout the comments.
Careful, I don't know the specifics of those Costco cords, but you can't plug two 15amp cords together and still expect to pull 15amps through them because the resistance increases with length.
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#6
thanks, also had $6.00 in points and used my SYW points.
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#7
these are rated 15 amps.........i have bought 2
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Quote from GregB8106
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these are rated 15 amps.........i have bought 2
Thanks for confirming. Must be a typo on the Sears website which is very common.
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#9
price seems to be $74.99 now :-(
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Quote from mpc11
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It depends on the quality of the wire and materials used (including # of cores) which I don't see stated anywhere. With the manuf listing this as 12A load, I wouldn't trust my 15A equipment on it. Especially with this length of cord, accounting for voltage drop. Would much rather buy a better cord than blow out a motor and spend hundreds (?) to replace it.

Quick reference here: http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com...d_419.html [engineeringtoolbox.com]

For 15A rating, best bet is Costco (2 pack of 50' 12/3 cords for $34.99) or the Amazon deal from the other day: https://slickdeals.net/f/10320788-various-yellow-jacket-extension-cords-20-off-coupon-amazon?src=Sit... which also lists this Sears deal along w/ various other stores' deals throughout the comments.
This is all exactly correct.

Low resistance is what you're looking for in a good extension cord. So that means lower AWG (fatter wire), fewer cores (gives a higher Amp rating for the same AWG), and SHORTER LENGTH when you don't need the length.

So a 14/3 50' cord will have lower resistance than a 12/3 100' cord. If you only need 40' of extension, you're better off using the 50' cord. So the suggestion to get two 12/3 50' cords rated at 15A is a great one.

Some more expensive cords build this capability in, by having a single cord with multiple plugs throughout the length, so you can just use the shortest distance you need.

A 14/3 25' cord has less resistance, and is therefore better than a 10/3 100' cord, when you need 25' or less.
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#11
Quote from sssyw
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So the suggestion to get two 12/3 50' cords rated at 15A is a great one.
Except that the resistance increases with length, so two 50' 15A cords plugged together will not yield a 100' length that can provide a full 15A of power. It will be somewhat less than that depending on the size and quality of wire.

15A over 100' will require a larger wire/better conductor than 15A over 50'.
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Quote from jeff34270
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Except that the resistance increases with length, so two 50' 15A cords plugged together will not yield a 100' length that can provide a full 15A of power. It will be somewhat less than that depending on the size and quality of wire.

15A over 100' will require a larger wire/better conductor than 15A over 50'.
2x 50' cords in series will double the resistance. For the same current, this will mean the voltage drop across the cord length will double. (I think we agree on these things). But the cord Amperage _rating_ will not necessarily change.

An extension cord with regular 15A connectors will be rated at 15A even if it's made with 0 AWG wire. So even if the wire in those Costco 50' 12/3 cords could handle 40A without getting too hot, they would be rated at 15A since they've got 15A connectors.

If you were a manufacturer making the base cord (no connectors, e.g., 50,000 feet per spool), spec'ed at 15A, you might choose the wires, say 12 AWG with whatever number of cores you want. Then you'd need to calculate the resistive heat per unit length created at that Amp rating, and you'd need to engineer the cord insulation to be able to withstand that sustained heating, with safety factor of course. Then you could stamp 15A 12/3 along the cord and make whatever length extension cord you want out of it. And all those cords could handle 15A without burning up the cord.

For example, see this product, which I have:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID.../100661445

12/3 AWG, 2 feet long, rated at 15 Amps. Resistance of that cord should be 1/25th of a 50' cord made out of the same base cord, due to 1/25th the length. Amp rating of the cord does not change when they make the 50' version:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID.../203736191

The cord's Amp rating is primarily based on the resistive heating within the cord. Whether or not the resulting voltage drop will burn up your lawn mower / chain saw / snow blower is to be specified by that tool. Those tools don't care about the cord heating (except that it increases resistance, and might cause a fire), only about the voltage drop seen at the tool. So the tools will typically know how much voltage drop they'd like to tolerate and will specify the length-and-AWG of cord they'll accept.

Another way to look at it ... If you bought a 100' cord rated at 15A, then cut it in half (actually anywhere in the middle) and attached connectors, basically making two new cords out of the old one ... The two new cords, when plugged together in series, would have the same electrical characteristics as the former cord, and they should and would have the same Amp rating. And their resistances would sum to the resistance of the former cord. I'm assuming no loss at the connector, which is an approximation, but a safe one.

===============

But the main point I was trying to make above is that you should always use the shortest cord you can. It keeps your tool powered with more voltage, which keeps it safer, and it reduces resistive power loss in the cord. So getting two 50' cords since you sometimes need a range of 100' gives you the flexibility to use only one of the cords when you only need 50' or less.
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