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Tronsmart USB-C to USB-A Cable with 56k Resistor for $2.99 AC + FSSS $3

$2.99
+16 Deal Score
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Apply Code = LHCOWH7M
  • USB-C Syncing: Transfer data between your USB-C devices such as your new Macbook, Chrome Pixel, LG G5, Nexus 6p/5x (up to 480Mbps)
  • Charging: Replace your original cable to charge your New Macbook, Chrome Pixel, LG G5, Nexus 6p/5x
  • Flexible USB-C to USB-A cable with sturdy construction has connectors with molded strain relief for frequent unplugging and durability
  • Compatible models:LG G6, LG G5, HTC 10, Google Pixel / Pixel XL, Nexus 5X / 6P, Lumia 950 / Lumia 950XL, 2015 Macbook, Google Pixel C and more USB-C devices.
  • Package content: 2 x Tronsmart USB 2.0 USB-C to USB-A Cable (6 Feet) , 18 Months worry-free warranty
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13 Comments

1

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#2
A lot of cable melting in the reviews
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#3
can someone explain why you need this resistor ?

I remember looking into it almost a year ago and I found the explanation but now I'm confused again

if I am plugging it in to AC wall charger rated 2.4amp or less for example while my device wants 3 amps what's the worst that can happen?

I understand if I plug into USB port on my computer it can burn the port. but if I'm plugging into power adapter what the worst can happen?

I've been using cable Without resistor and 2.4a adapter for almost a year everything's fine

I remember reading somewhere the phone's USB port can get damaged but I just searched the web and can't find the proof of that

thanks
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#4
Quote from zyx987
:
can someone explain why you need this resistor ?

I remember looking into it almost a year ago and I found the explanation but now I'm confused again

if I am plugging it in to AC wall charger rated 2.4amp or less for example while my device wants 3 amps what's the worst that can happen?

I understand if I plug into USB port on my computer it can burn the port. but if I'm plugging into power adapter what the worst can happen?

I've been using cable Without resistor and 2.4a adapter for almost a year everything's fine

I remember reading somewhere the phone's USB port can get damaged but I just searched the web and can't find the proof of that

thanks
Without a resistor your device will try to pull 3 amps when the cable is only able to deliver 1.5 or 2.4 amps. That can cause electrical damage to the port, the cable, or the outlet, or all three.
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#5
Quote from wnat35
:
Without a resistor your device will try to pull 3 amps when the cable is only able to deliver 1.5 or 2.4 amps. That can cause electrical damage to the port, the cable, or the outlet, or all three.
can it cause damage to the phone's port? if so how?
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#6
Quote from zyx987
:
can it cause damage to the phone's port? if so how?
USB-C is able to deliver power two ways. For example, you could plug a phone into a compatible laptop and the phone would charge the laptop. And it's hard to know how that negotiating plays out, I remember seeing someone plugging their Pixel into a MacBook, and the Pixel charged the MacBook. So if you use an adapter without a resistor, the phone thinks it is safe to deliver 3 amps of current through its USB-C port. The resistor would throttle that down to a safe current. But if the adapter doesn't have a resistor, the phone delivers 3 amps through a cable that can only handle 2.4 or less. Electrons go haywire and something fries, whether it's the cable or your port.

That's my understanding.
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#7
Quote from wnat35
:
USB-C is able to deliver power two ways. For example, you could plug a phone into a compatible laptop and the phone would charge the laptop. And it's hard to know how that negotiating plays out, I remember seeing someone plugging their Pixel into a MacBook, and the Pixel charged the MacBook. So if you use an adapter without a resistor, the phone thinks it is safe to deliver 3 amps of current through its USB-C port. The resistor would throttle that down to a safe current. But if the adapter doesn't have a resistor, the phone delivers 3 amps through a cable that can only handle 2.4 or less. Electrons go haywire and something fries, whether it's the cable or your port.

That's my understanding.
It can be 4 things. Charging port or cable like you stated. As well as the wall charger and if you're unlucky and the device has no overcurrent protection your phone's motherboard which is essentially your phone.
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#8
Dam one guy says his phone was fried. So let's see... Save 5 bucks or destroy my phone, hmmmm...
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#9
Out of stock!
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#10
Dead?
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#11
Quote from wnat35
:
USB-C is able to deliver power two ways. For example, you could plug a phone into a compatible laptop and the phone would charge the laptop. And it's hard to know how that negotiating plays out, I remember seeing someone plugging their Pixel into a MacBook, and the Pixel charged the MacBook. So if you use an adapter without a resistor, the phone thinks it is safe to deliver 3 amps of current through its USB-C port. The resistor would throttle that down to a safe current. But if the adapter doesn't have a resistor, the phone delivers 3 amps through a cable that can only handle 2.4 or less. Electrons go haywire and something fries, whether it's the cable or your port.

That's my understanding.
To be clear, the resistor doesn't actually throttle the current; that'd be a significant waste of energy. The 56k resistor acts as a flag - if that resistance is detected, the devices stick to a lower level of current.

It's not the same as a old baseboard heater with it's variable resistor thermostat.
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#12
Quote from pdinc
:
To be clear, the resistor doesn't actually throttle the current; that'd be a significant waste of energy. The 56k resistor acts as a flag - if that resistance is detected, the devices stick to a lower level of current.

It's not the same as a old baseboard heater with it's variable resistor thermostat.
Makes sense.
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#13
This triggered my deal alert for a U.S. Robotics 56K modem
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#14
Quote from pdinc
:
To be clear, the resistor doesn't actually throttle the current; that'd be a significant waste of energy. The 56k resistor acts as a flag - if that resistance is detected, the devices stick to a lower level of current.

It's not the same as a old baseboard heater with it's variable resistor thermostat.
This. The resistor tells the USB protocol to limit power.
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