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CyberPower Intelligent LCD 1000VA 600W AVR Mini UPS EXPIRED

$75
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B&H Photo Video has CyberPower Intelligent LCD 1000VA 600W AVR Mini UPS (CP1000AVRLCD) for $109.95 - $30 "clipped" coupon = $74.95. Shipping is free. Thanks Discombobulated
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Has earned 4.5 stars overall (out of possible 5) based on 3,612 customer reviews at Amazon. - brisar

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For those who care:

Waveform: Simulated Sine Wave

Wouldn't expect anything else for this price, good deal for those who don't care
8 Helpful?
I'll try to answer, with my limited knowledge.

How the power coming from the backup is formed, your power source to your home is true sine wave fluctuating from around -170V to +170V 60 times per second in the US. UPS can provide a true sine wave, which mimics exactly this range, a simulated sine wave which is close but not exact, or square wave where the are basically two voltage outputs (probably -120V and +120V?) that just toggle back and forth.

The problem with simulated sine wave appears to be the duration at which is can be at 0V. If you've ever seen the digital vs analog graphs for music it is very similar to that. The simulated sine steps through voltages and will stay at -170V, 0V, and +170V (there may be more steps) for certain duration rather than fluidly increasing/decreasing in potential. This can cause issues in sensitive equipment, but is much better than the simple square wave output.

I believe this is only an issue when power is lost in most cases, otherwise you are getting power from the source in a pure sine wave from your power supplier.
6 Helpful?

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#3
Great deal with the coupon code, free shipping and no tax! Thanks OP
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Our community has rated this post as helpful. If you agree, why not rep JodlRodl?
#4
For those who care:

Waveform: Simulated Sine Wave

Wouldn't expect anything else for this price, good deal for those who don't care
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#5
Thanks! Been looking for a new one and this is nice and beefy. Thanks op!
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#6
Quote from JodlRodl
:
For those who care:

Waveform: Simulated Sine Wave

Wouldn't expect anything else for this price, good deal for those who don't care
What does this mean?
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#7
In for 1. Thx OP. Repped
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#8
Best UPS brand on the market.
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Our community has rated this post as helpful. If you agree, why not rep bmatt?
#9
Quote from raf1919
:
What does this mean?
I'll try to answer, with my limited knowledge.

How the power coming from the backup is formed, your power source to your home is true sine wave fluctuating from around -170V to +170V 60 times per second in the US. UPS can provide a true sine wave, which mimics exactly this range, a simulated sine wave which is close but not exact, or square wave where the are basically two voltage outputs (probably -120V and +120V?) that just toggle back and forth.

The problem with simulated sine wave appears to be the duration at which is can be at 0V. If you've ever seen the digital vs analog graphs for music it is very similar to that. The simulated sine steps through voltages and will stay at -170V, 0V, and +170V (there may be more steps) for certain duration rather than fluidly increasing/decreasing in potential. This can cause issues in sensitive equipment, but is much better than the simple square wave output.

I believe this is only an issue when power is lost in most cases, otherwise you are getting power from the source in a pure sine wave from your power supplier.
Reply Helpful Comment? 6 0

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#10
Quote from bmatt
:
I'll try to answer, with my limited knowledge.

How the power coming from the backup is formed, your power source to your home is true sine wave fluctuating from around -170V to +170V 60 times per second in the US. UPS can provide a true sine wave, which mimics exactly this range, a simulated sine wave which is close but not exact, or square wave where the are basically two voltage outputs (probably -120V and +120V?) that just toggle back and forth.

The problem with simulated sine wave appears to be the duration at which is can be at 0V. If you've ever seen the digital vs analog graphs for music it is very similar to that. The simulated sine steps through voltages and will stay at -170V, 0V, and +170V (there may be more steps) for certain duration rather than fluidly increasing/decreasing in potential. This can cause issues in sensitive equipment, but is much better than the simple square wave output.

I believe this is only an issue when power is lost in most cases, otherwise you are getting power from the source in a pure sine wave from your power supplier.
I have heard that if you have a PSU with active PFC, you want a UPS with pure sine wave.
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#11
she said not only is this a good price and includes free shipping, but also the 2 12 batteries that are included run about $15-17 so thats $30+ right there. the batteries last 5+ years. dont store this unplugged else the batteries will crystallize and go bad.
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#12
Quote from dmikester10
:
I have heard that if you have a PSU with active PFC, you want a UPS with pure sine wave.
Only if you have a poor quality power supply. It's coincidental that as Active PFC becomes the norm, the psu manufacturers are cheaping out on the cap sizing which would otherwise be adequate for the short time without power while the ups switches over. Pure Sine Wave units always switch over incrementally faster, which is as much a factor in those units working as the sine curve dmikester10 accurately describes above. As an example my girlfriend's power supply is a Corsair RM850 which is Active PFC, yet the computer keeps running when I pull the plug on any of my ups units from 625va to 1500va, all simulated sine wave.
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#13
Quote from raf1919
:
What does this mean?
Quote from bmatt
:
I'll try to answer, with my limited knowledge.

How the power coming from the backup is formed, your power source to your home is true sine wave fluctuating from around -170V to +170V 60 times per second in the US. UPS can provide a true sine wave, which mimics exactly this range, a simulated sine wave which is close but not exact, or square wave where the are basically two voltage outputs (probably -120V and +120V?) that just toggle back and forth.

The problem with simulated sine wave appears to be the duration at which is can be at 0V. If you've ever seen the digital vs analog graphs for music it is very similar to that. The simulated sine steps through voltages and will stay at -170V, 0V, and +170V (there may be more steps) for certain duration rather than fluidly increasing/decreasing in potential. This can cause issues in sensitive equipment, but is much better than the simple square wave output.

I believe this is only an issue when power is lost in most cases, otherwise you are getting power from the source in a pure sine wave from your power supplier.
Quote from dmikester10
:
I have heard that if you have a PSU with active PFC, you want a UPS with pure sine wave.
Correct - If an active PFC power supply (pretty much all modern PC power supplies) is hooked up to this, it may trigger the power protection circuits on it from time to time, causing your PC to shut off unexpectedly. This page [newegg.com] has some great information on the subject (Obviously it's slightly advertising like since it's put out by CyberPower, but it's pretty accurate nonetheless)
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#14
Quote from bmatt
:
I'll try to answer, with my limited knowledge.

How the power coming from the backup is formed, your power source to your home is true sine wave fluctuating from around -170V to +170V 60 times per second in the US. UPS can provide a true sine wave, which mimics exactly this range, a simulated sine wave which is close but not exact, or square wave where the are basically two voltage outputs (probably -120V and +120V?) that just toggle back and forth.

The problem with simulated sine wave appears to be the duration at which is can be at 0V. If you've ever seen the digital vs analog graphs for music it is very similar to that. The simulated sine steps through voltages and will stay at -170V, 0V, and +170V (there may be more steps) for certain duration rather than fluidly increasing/decreasing in potential. This can cause issues in sensitive equipment, but is much better than the simple square wave output.

I believe this is only an issue when power is lost in most cases, otherwise you are getting power from the source in a pure sine wave from your power supplier.
So this one has this?
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#15
In for one. Was great timing, as I have to find replacement batteries for my 1285AVR (or replace it with 2 1000's).
Thanks for posting!
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