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EnGenius Whole-Home Wi-Fi System, AC1200 Dual-Band Mesh Wifi (EMR3000-KIT) Set of 3 for $226.34 FS

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EnGenius Technologies EnMesh Whole-Home Wi-Fi System, AC1200 Dual-Band Mesh Wifi, Router replacement for whole home coverage [set of 3] (EMR3000-KIT)
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$266.34 - $40 coupon = $226.34

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https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06ZY6H...vpc_slickd
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Created 11-03-2017 at 11:39 AM by DealSan
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12 Comments

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#2
I am pretty networking savvy, but something escapes me with these new mesh network devices. I have for years had a few Apple Airport Extreme base stations creating one network for me in my house. Then, for example, I have my xbox and TV plugged into of the base stations via ethernet, but also have laptops, ipads, and phones roaming around the house.

How do the new mesh network devices differ from such a setup I have today and would I even benefit from swapping out to the new mesh network devices like this deal?
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#3
Unfortunately the term "mesh" has been hijacked by consumer marketing and now one or 2 AP's wirelessly backhauling to a master wired AP is now termed meshing.
So, MESH wifi systems use a separate wireless radio to connect to each other like they would with ethernet cables back to a ethernet switch.
It is a way to spread wifi radio coverage (more AP's) over a wider area but not have to run dedicated cables to each AP.

The AP's talk to each other via the backhaul radio (mesh) and the clients talk to the AP's via the client radio(s).

Running wires is better but what most of these systems are now offering is the ability to control multiple AP's with a centralized GUI.
This has previously been only really available to expensive Enterprise systems but Ubiquiti made it more affordable to SOHO's with the free Unifi software.
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Last edited by SlickLULZ November 3, 2017 at 06:01 PM.
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#4
Quote from SlickLULZ
:
Unfortunately the term "mesh" has been hijacked by consumer marketing and now one or 2 AP's wirelessly backhauling to a master wired AP is now termed meshing.
So, MESH wifi systems use a separate wireless radio to connect to each other like they would with ethernet cables back to a ethernet switch.
It is a way to spread wifi radio coverage (more AP's) over a wider area but not have to run dedicated cables to each AP.

The AP's talk to each other via the backhaul radio (mesh) and the clients talk to the AP's via the client radio(s).

Running wires is better but what most of these systems are now offering is the ability to control multiple AP's with a centralized GUI.
This has previously been only really available to expensive Enterprise systems but Ubiquiti made it more affordable to SOHO's with the free Unifi software.
Other home WiFi kits like the Google WiFi system is a true mesh where there are 3 radios. 2 for clients and 1 for the mesh function. This one does not have the 3 radio so I imagine one radio (5ghz) is serving as the back haul connection and for clients at the same time:
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#5
Quote from nightowl2k2
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Other home WiFi kits like the Google WiFi system is a true mesh where there are 3 radios. 2 for clients and 1 for the mesh function. This one does not have the 3 radio so I imagine one radio (5ghz) is serving as the back haul connection and for clients at the same time:
Three radios does not make a true mesh.
You do not need to use one of the radios in a dual radio AP for clients and can dedicate it to mesh backhaul only. I have done this many times in Enterprise Aruba systems.
True a third radio, allows for a dedicated backhaul connection but that is not true meshing.
A "true mesh" is where multiple AP's (think 10+ not 2 or 3) all talk to each other and form multiple redundant paths back to the wired portal AP. If an AP should fail in the mesh, the other AP's in the mesh will reroute traffic through other AP's.

I do agree that 3 radio AP's are better but only if the the hardware can handle the management of 3 radios and the logic that goes with it.

Franky, meshing is lazy networking and when given a choice will hardwire all AP's.
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Last edited by SlickLULZ November 3, 2017 at 07:38 PM.
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#6
Quote from synchrophoto
:
I am pretty networking savvy, but something escapes me with these new mesh network devices. I have for years had a few Apple Airport Extreme base stations creating one network for me in my house. Then, for example, I have my xbox and TV plugged into of the base stations via ethernet, but also have laptops, ipads, and phones roaming around the house.

How do the new mesh network devices differ from such a setup I have today and would I even benefit from swapping out to the new mesh network devices like this deal?
Your question confirms that, in fact, you're not network savvy.
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#7
Would these mesh network handle seamless handoff from one AP to another as you walked through the house? My experience is that the receiver tends to hang on to the AP it is connected to, even if the signal was weak, until it lost contact and only then connected to the next strongest signal.
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#8
I haven't checked this product, but most these kits including Google do not have a dedicated radio for back haul. So if you can't run Ethernet to each AP then you loose 50% speed on the mesh for any AP connected wirelessly. Netgear Orbi does have a dedicated radio for the back haul, not sure if any of the others kits do yet or not.

Systems like this function like an enterprise wireless solution with a controller and APs. It allows the APs to talk which allows for handoffs and other things. So if you roam from one spot in your home to another it's seamless.
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#9
Quote from zhopa
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Your question confirms that, in fact, you're not network savvy.
Wow, really not helpful response
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#10
Quote from SlickLULZ
:
Three radios does not make a true mesh.
You do not need to use one of the radios in a dual radio AP for clients and can dedicate it to mesh backhaul only. I have done this many times in Enterprise Aruba systems.
True a third radio, allows for a dedicated backhaul connection but that is not true meshing.
A "true mesh" is where multiple AP's (think 10+ not 2 or 3) all talk to each other and form multiple redundant paths back to the wired portal AP. If an AP should fail in the mesh, the other AP's in the mesh will reroute traffic through other AP's.

I do agree that 3 radio AP's are better but only if the the hardware can handle the management of 3 radios and the logic that goes with it.

Franky, meshing is lazy networking and when given a choice will hardwire all AP's.
My question is: does mesh WiFi need client support it? Like the one my iPhone connected to is dead. Will I feel it is dead? I mean, does mesh WiFi need few seconds to switch to other AP as the non mesh multi point WIFI?
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#11
Quote from rainlake
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My question is: does mesh WiFi need client support it? Like the one my iPhone connected to is dead. Will I feel it is dead? I mean, does mesh WiFi need few seconds to switch to other AP as the non mesh multi point WIFI?
I believe your confusing technologies.
What we are really talking about here is a centrally managed, multiple wireless access point system. If you want more, dispersed coverage, you need more access points. Typical for businesses and campuses etc.
Well how do you connect those AP's to your network. You can use wires. (the best way). But that can be costly or downright impossible.
Or you can use a wireless technology to connect all those AP's together for convenience or cost etc. That is what MESH does. We should really call it wireless back-hauling.

What you are really asking (I think) is, Will my iphone (client device) roam (Wifi roaming) from one system access point to another as needed to maintain the best connection. It's supposed to but when it does is historically managed by the iphone and not the Wifi system.
And iphones are historically known to hold on to their connection even if there is a better signal in range. Roaming aggressiveness is considered LOW.
As to whether or not the iphone will move to another AP in the system if one AP dies?? Well it should if the other AP is picked up by the iphone.
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Last edited by SlickLULZ November 6, 2017 at 06:56 AM.
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#12
Quote from mm60
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Would these mesh network handle seamless handoff from one AP to another as you walked through the house? My experience is that the receiver tends to hang on to the AP it is connected to, even if the signal was weak, until it lost contact and only then connected to the next strongest signal.
Yes they will but roaming aggressiveness is historically handled by the device and not the wifi system. I say historically because systems developers recognize that this is an issue and would like to implement technologies to better manage wifi client roaming.
You can try to force clients to roam by restricting client connections to a certain RSSI.
The AP basically can be set to sever connections or flat out deny connections to devices whose connection strength is below a certain threshhold.
But you have to watch out because if a client device roams too much, it can cause issues as well. Like if you want a stable software VPN connection as one example.
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#13
Quote from DrYou
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I haven't checked this product, but most these kits including Google do not have a dedicated radio for back haul. So if you can't run Ethernet to each AP then you loose 50% speed on the mesh for any AP connected wirelessly. Netgear Orbi does have a dedicated radio for the back haul, not sure if any of the others kits do yet or not.

Systems like this function like an enterprise wireless solution with a controller and APs. It allows the APs to talk which allows for handoffs and other things. So if you roam from one spot in your home to another it's seamless.

In regards to the wireless back-haul causing a 50% loss of bandwidth...
You are correct to some degree but I think you need to look at the systems specs a bit more before you decide all dual-radio AP's will cause issues. If the back haul radio is 1x1 non-MIMO vs. 3x3 or 4x4 MIMO then that changes a lot. I am sure you are aware that MIMO stands for multiple in- multiple out and allows for multiple data streams across the same radio band. It was designed to address the half-duplex nature of 1x1 wireless transmissions. And if those AP's support MU-MIMO then you have even more capability.
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Last edited by SlickLULZ November 6, 2017 at 07:33 AM.
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