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Home Depot $149 RIDGID 18-Volt Lithium-Ion Cordless Gen5x Brushless Drill/Driver and Impact Driver Combo Kit w/(2) 1.5Ah Batteries, Charger and Bag

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https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGI...=301853891

RIDGID introduces the GEN5X Brushless 18-Volt Drill/Driver and 3-Speed Impact Driver Combo Kit. This new and improved kit features the power to tackle any jobsite task. RIDGID Brushless Motors offer up to 50% more runtime and longer motor life. With registration, this kit is backed by the Industry's Only Lifetime Service Agreement.
  • Drill/driver - all metal gears for extended jobsite durability
  • Drill/driver - 2-speed settings for matching power to the task
  • Impact driver - best-in-class torque with an Industry Leading 2,250 in.-lbs. of torque
  • Impact driver - 3-speed settings to provide adjustable power and speed for any job
  • Hex-grip micro texture for added user comfort
  • RIDGID: powerful, durable, professional
  • Backed by the industry's only lifetime service agreement
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Created 11-23-2017 at 09:58 AM by User5857
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47 Comments

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#2
Good deal, in for 1. Thx
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#3
What is the regular price of this drill ?
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Quote from Butcherboy
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What is the regular price of this drill ?

Looks like $129


https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGI.../206955210
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#5
Can someone explain to me what use the average person has for an impact driver? The drill/driver takes care the same things for the vast majority of consumers. An impact driver is for big jobs where you need its torque to fasten many screws quickly. Basically, I wish they weren't sold together so often. Just give me a deal on them individually.

Last year this drill/driver was $80. Gimme that again!
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Last edited by discospider November 23, 2017 at 02:09 PM.
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Quote from discospider
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Can someone explain to me what use the average person has for an impact driver? The drill/driver takes care the same things for the vast majority of consumers. An impact driver is for big jobs where you need its torque to fasten many screws quickly. Basically, I wish they weren't sold together so often. Just give me a deal on them individually.

Last year this drill/driver was $80. Gimme that again!
Impact drivers are, IMHO, a must have for tightening/loosening about anything! What happens is the bit (output) has weights (inside) that spins really fast. When the load increases and the bit slows down the weights 'hammer' against the output transferring a BUNCH of force to the bit.

The result is a bunch of shocks being transmitted to the screw (or?) turning it ever so slightly. Where a drill/driver spins and can force the bit out of the screw impact drivers tend not to bounce out - extending bit life and screw.

This being said I find the slower 12 impact drivers are best for 80% of my work. More powerful/faster ones are prone to jumping out (still not as bad as a drill driver)

By far the best, IMHO is the Makita 12v sets. Can't say enough about the size, power and durability. I have the org 10.8v set as well and batteries are STILL strong as new! These can be found for ~$100 on a good sale.
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#7
Pictures shown are GEN4X, not GEN5X.
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Quote from JohnR3968
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Impact drivers are, IMHO, a must have for tightening/loosening about anything! What happens is the bit (output) has weights (inside) that spins really fast. When the load increases and the bit slows down the weights 'hammer' against the output transferring a BUNCH of force to the bit.

The result is a bunch of shocks being transmitted to the screw (or?) turning it ever so slightly. Where a drill/driver spins and can force the bit out of the screw impact drivers tend not to bounce out - extending bit life and screw.

This being said I find the slower 12 impact drivers are best for 80% of my work. More powerful/faster ones are prone to jumping out (still not as bad as a drill driver)

By far the best, IMHO is the Makita 12v sets. Can't say enough about the size, power and durability. I have the org 10.8v set as well and batteries are STILL strong as new! These can be found for ~$100 on a good sale.
Good point about 12v. A lot of people see 18 or 20v and automatically assume higher is better. But 12v is ideal for most people and provide better control as well as the smaller form factor. A 12v set paired with a separate hammer drill is the best setup.
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Quote from JohnR3968
:
Impact drivers are, IMHO, a must have for tightening/loosening about anything! What happens is the bit (output) has weights (inside) that spins really fast. When the load increases and the bit slows down the weights 'hammer' against the output transferring a BUNCH of force to the bit.

The result is a bunch of shocks being transmitted to the screw (or?) turning it ever so slightly. Where a drill/driver spins and can force the bit out of the screw impact drivers tend not to bounce out - extending bit life and screw.

This being said I find the slower 12 impact drivers are best for 80% of my work. More powerful/faster ones are prone to jumping out (still not as bad as a drill driver)

By far the best, IMHO is the Makita 12v sets. Can't say enough about the size, power and durability. I have the org 10.8v set as well and batteries are STILL strong as new! These can be found for ~$100 on a good sale.
Correct

Basically any time you are wanting to drive a screw or remove a screw, you are better off with an impact driver. Faster and less likely to strip the screw head. If you only wanted one tool in your arsenal then yes, drill/driver. But get both and only use the drill as a drill. And the impact driver anytime you need to screw something.
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#10
I got an impact driver years ago (Ryobi originally) and seriously, it is life-changing. It effortlessly drives screws. With a torx head you can pull a screw all the way through a 2x4 - they are that powerful. I started doing some serious renovations and the Ryobi wasn't cutting it, went to a refurb Ridgid X4, then got the Gen5X kit about 4 years ago. Added a few tools including another Gen5X impact driver. I haven't had a chance to try out the brushless ones though.

Ever since then I look down upon those poor souls still using a drill to drive screws.
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Last edited by User5857 November 23, 2017 at 06:43 PM.
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Quote from liquidiq
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I got an impact driver years ago (Ryobi originally) and seriously, it is life-changing. It effortlessly drives screws. With a torx head you can pull a screw all the way through a 2x4 - they are that powerful. I started doing some serious renovations and the Ryobi wasn't cutting it, went to a refurb Ridgid X4, then got the Gen5X kit about 4 years ago. Added a few tools including another Gen5X impact driver. I haven't had a change to try out the brushless ones though.

Ever since then I look down upon those poor souls still using a drill to drive screws.
yeah with a torx bit and star head construction screws my Gen4 could basically just keep driving the 3 inch screw straight through a soft pine 2x4 if I wanted to...head and all...

a drill CAN drive screws. That doesn't mean it's the best tool for the job. The drill bogs down and then next thing you are stripping the head of the screw. With the impact driver it is making a bunch of tiny whacks to rotate the screw without letting it get stuck in place and strip the head. It's why they use impact wrenches to loosen tough bolts rather than giant "drills" to do the job

Like LiquidIq above, when I got my impact driver 5 years ago and drove my first screws I was like Seriously? I've lived without this baby for HOW LONG? I hadn't really appreciated what they were until I used it....
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Quote from discospider
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Can someone explain to me what use the average person has for an impact driver? The drill/driver takes care the same things for the vast majority of consumers. An impact driver is for big jobs where you need its torque to fasten many screws quickly. Basically, I wish they weren't sold together so often. Just give me a deal on them individually.

Last year this drill/driver was $80. Gimme that again!
Typical homeowner here, couple years ago I was in the process of installing Gladiator Gearwall in my garage. With an old corded Dewalt drill, what a pita it was to drive those screws down into the studs, I had 2 sides of the garage to cover with about 60-70% coverage per wall, at 16 screws per 4x1 foot panel of Gearwall I was only doing about 2-4 panels per day because with the old drill I had to really shove the weight of my shoulder and body to get the screws in, it was exhausting. Just so happens at the time there was a deal on the first gen5x Ridgid brushed drill/impact combo so I bought it, let me tell you it made the job 1000% easier, screws went in like butter, it was almost comically easy to drive the screws. I only do a few projects around the house per year but the impact is the only thing I use to drive screws now, the drill is only for drilling holes and I almost never do that anymore.
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Last edited by casetronic November 23, 2017 at 10:39 PM.
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Quote from JohnR3968
:
Impact drivers are, IMHO, a must have for tightening/loosening about anything! What happens is the bit (output) has weights (inside) that spins really fast. When the load increases and the bit slows down the weights 'hammer' against the output transferring a BUNCH of force to the bit.

The result is a bunch of shocks being transmitted to the screw (or?) turning it ever so slightly. Where a drill/driver spins and can force the bit out of the screw impact drivers tend not to bounce out - extending bit life and screw.

This being said I find the slower 12 impact drivers are best for 80% of my work. More powerful/faster ones are prone to jumping out (still not as bad as a drill driver)

By far the best, IMHO is the Makita 12v sets. Can't say enough about the size, power and durability. I have the org 10.8v set as well and batteries are STILL strong as new! These can be found for ~$100 on a good sale.
I have a couple impact drivers myself (a 12v Bosch and the 3 speed 18v Dewalt), and honestly I never felt like I "needed" them. Realistically, all the woodworking, home improvement, and repairs I've done so far could have been done fine with my 18v compact drill (Dewalt DCD791) as it had more than enough torque for anything I needed to do. However the impact's speed things up a lot, which is why I own them.

I do think a typical home owner would do fine with a single drill and no impact. However, that single drill would need to be a fairly decent one, not the super budget stuff. But at the cost of a good single drill, it would simply make more sense to just get a 12v drill/impact combo. I like the 12v Bosch set myself, but still keep the 18v Dewalt stuff around for some applications.
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#14
Quote from liquidiq
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Looks like $129
https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGI.../206955210
Specs for that R86009 BL drill is pretty good: 650 in lb torque and an aux handle. Hopefully that's the drill in this combo kit (I know that Ridgid had once made detuned version of 12V drills specially for a combo kit so hopefully they're not doing that for the 18V line). If HD's description is correct, the BL impact driver is supposingly the R86037 3-speed [homedepot.com] which is $79 for the bare tool. Maybe someone can take a picture at HD to confirm.

Quote from casetronic
:
Typical homeowner here, couple years ago I was in the process of installing Gladiator Gearwall in my garage. With an old corded Dewalt drill, what a pita it was to drive those screws down into the studs, I had 2 sides of the garage to cover with about 60-70% coverage per wall, at 16 screws per 4x1 foot panel of Gearwall I was only doing about 2-4 panels per day because with the old drill I had to really shove the weight of my shoulder and body to get the screws in, it was exhausting. Just so happens at the time there was a deal on the first gen5x Ridgid brushed drill/impact combo so I bought it, let me tell you it made the job 1000% easier, screws went in like butter, it was almost comically easy to drive the screws. I only do a few projects around the house per year but the impact is the only thing I use to drive screws now, the drill is only for drilling holes and I almost never do that anymore.
So true. I've framed walls, installed plywood subfloor, etc with cordless (and worse, corded) drills and stripped so many 2-4" drywall screws with the screwhead still sticking out, worn Philips bits, drills spinning out of control, almost losing balance on the ladder, etc. An accidental exposure to an impact driver (dad bought a cheap combo kit for the drill) and we wondered what we were missing for 10+ years.

Corded drills are way worse than cordless because AC motors are torqueless at no/low RPM and generally more top heavy/unbalanced. With a jab of the touchy trigger to get it going and things go haywire. Screwdriving with a corded drill should be a criminal offense. I still prefer cordless drill over impact for shorter screws / soft wood due to better control and low noise.
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Last edited by FatFaluz November 24, 2017 at 03:25 PM.
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Thanks, OP. Went in-store to check it out and pulled the trigger. It's Gen 5X and brushless as advertised.
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