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Seagate BarraCuda ST3000DM008 3TB 3.5" 64MB 7200RPM - $70 + FS (20 Limit) @ Newegg

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Seagate BarraCuda ST3000DM008 3TB 64MB 7200RPM -
https://www.newegg.com/Product/Pr...22-178-994 - 69.99 w/ EMCBCBD23 promo code till 12/13 midnight PST

Good price considering CCC says lowest in the past few years has been 74.99.

Usually Newegg has a limit of 5, which is a bummer for NAS builders. This deal has a 20 unit limit. (Newegg's quantity cooldown for an account is 48 hours).

If you are having a problem applying the promo code to more then 5 drives, use newegg's cs chat to get a refund credit. I ordered more than 5 @70 without any problems this way, because the email flyer doesn't put in a limit like other items. Contact CS within cancellation eligible window (like within 5 minutes of creating the order) to get a refund to original payment. If you wait out a day, you'll probably get a CS GC instead.

These aren't technically relating to the lawsuit. The model number in the lawsuit is specifically ST3000DM001.

BackBlaze's original failure study [backblaze.com]
Brief lowdown on lawsuit [pcworld.com]
Actual legal complaint [hbsslaw.com]
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#2
is this related to the HDD for which Seagate is hit with the lawsuit? I think it should get 10 finger down!
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#3
Quote from wildpig1234
:
is this related to the HDD for which Seagate is hit with the lawsuit? I think it should get 10 finger down!
No it is not. Read the legal brief.

And it is extremely specific. If you read the original Backblaze study, Seagate's other drives were pretty much meh or at least in line with other drives. It was the ST3000DM001 specifically @ 3TB. The Barracuda XT @3TB wasn't an outlier. The class action brief only mentions the ST3000DM001 model (Seagate Barracuda 7200.14). These drives have gone out of production. There's really no way to know about hard drive failure pre-purchase. You can only go by trends, gut feeling, and your predilection for certain brand loyalty.

If you look at the studies by Rackspace, Backblaze, Google [googleusercontent.com], Puget, even Imgur, and others, hard drive failure rates vary and often correlated by model, batch, year. By the time they compile the statistics for drives, the drives are already out of production and mostly only relevant for the corporate IT deployment usage where there are still large supplies of spares on hand.

It's still a major bummer to have your drive die, no doubt. But one anecdotal customer experience does not a statistic make. If it did, every hard drive product line and model within those lines should be suspect. I've had WD red label NAS drives die within two months, and conversely budget drives last a while. The vice versa is also true.

If you look at Backblaze's study, the most interesting thing is that they are even using consumer drives, they aren't using the fancy NAS, data center ones. They are using the drives found in Best Buy computers, and shipped by Dell for personal PCs. Google's own data centers also use consumer level drives, they just have triple redundancy. Good model, bad model, always backup.

Think of bad drives kind of like bad cars. By the time the recall is out, the car is out of production already. Like the Ford Explorer a few years back. Horrible safety issues, but limited to a specific year. Does it make all Ford Explorers lemons? No. It's had its fair bit of issues as a model though. But even cars that generally rate high also experience recalls, like the recent Honda Civic recalls in the past few years. Does this mean that future Ford Explorers and Honda Civics are bad? No. The annoying thing for cars like hard drives is that the issues won't be apparently until after-the-fact, when the whole point was avoiding problems by buying a specific model and brand based soley on previous reputation and tangential reviews that evaluate a few days worth of performance and extrapolate long term reliability.
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Last edited by targeter15 December 13, 2017 at 04:19 AM.
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#4
I've not had good luck with Seagate drives for the past few years. They've been coming with a two year warranty, and they've been dying soon after the 2 year mark. At least for me. They're the cheapest, so I've been buying them, but it's getting kind of old.

Edit: Coincidentally, my last failure was a two year old 3TB external Seagate. I'm betting that it has the ST3000DM001. I'll open it up tonight when I get home.
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Last edited by cson777 December 13, 2017 at 09:03 AM.
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#5
Any deals on a 2.5 suitable for a PS4? At least 2 TB.

TIA.
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#6
Too many sad stories in the product reviews. Pity.
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#7
it happens across all brands and models but after my ST3000DM001 crapped out on me, I've decided to never go with Seagate ever again.
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#8
Quote from rchan326
:
it happens across all brands and models but after my ST3000DM001 crapped out on me, I've decided to never go with Seagate ever again.
Same with me. Same model, died without any warning.
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#9
Just had an ST3000DM001 slowly corrupt itself in my RAID 5 at the 1 year mark on the dot. That certainly doesn't bode well for the other three drives in the array.

I'm replacing it with another brand and am probably going to avoid Seagate for the next few years.

I know this deal isn't for that drive; hopefully those that pick this up have better luck.
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#10
Quote from jbrubaker
:
Just had an ST3000DM001 slowly corrupt itself in my RAID 5 at the 1 year mark on the dot. That certainly doesn't bode well for the other three drives in the array.

I'm replacing it with another brand and am probably going to avoid Seagate for the next few years.

I know this deal isn't for that drive; hopefully those that pick this up have better luck.
I don't trust any brand frankly, and I've long since moved away from RAID 5. Even, RAIDZ2/RAID6 isn't enough any more for me to feel safe. Frankly, double parity not enough anymore. I've moved to using RAIDZ3 arrays, because I want a minimum of triple parity.

Half the problem is that when one drive fails, the chances of another drive failing during rebuild isn't completely uncommon. It's happened once or twice to me. It's becoming more common now because of the use of higher and higher capacity drives, which results in longer and longer rebuild times - more stress on the array. Another reason I'm not too keen on using the 8TB WD red label drives that people have been breaking out of the BB deal. I rather have ten or so 2TB/3TB than four or six 8TB drives.

If you're only going to use a single drive, it's either got to be backed up frequently to the cloud or some other redundant storage, or you pretty much have to be willing to let all that data go down the tubes. Even the highest rated drives have a failure rate, and I'm not willing to roll the dice be it 1 out of 100 or 1 out of 10. The alternative is to be willing to fork out about 1k-2k per drive to let someone like DriveSavers recover the data.
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#11
Man these things scare me. My HDD is 1TB and about 8 years old, when I built the new computer about 4 years ago I just transferred the HDD from the previous computer to it. 8 years and it's worked flawlessly. Now I'm looking for a replacement for my old buddy, but every SD alert thread I get is full of "don't buy X brand, they suck!". The "Toshiba P300 3TB PC Desktop Hard Drive 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5 Inch Internal Hard Drive Retail Packaging HDWD130XZSTA" is $74 (no promo code that I know of but only $4 diff), which one is more reliable/better purchase?
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Last edited by wolfing December 13, 2017 at 12:54 PM.
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#12
Quote from wolfing
:
Man these things scare me. My HDD is 1TB and about 8 years old, when I built the new computer about 4 years ago I just transferred the HDD from the previous computer to it. 8 years and it's worked flawlessly. Now I'm looking for a replacement for my old buddy, but every SD alert thread I get is full of "don't buy X brand, they suck!". The "Toshiba P300 3TB PC Desktop Hard Drive 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5 Inch Internal Hard Drive Retail Packaging HDWD130XZSTA" is $74 (no promo code that I know of but only $4 diff), which one is more reliable/better purchase?
There's no way to know for certainty. By the time the real studies get published like those from Backblaze, the model is already out of production, just like car recalls or food recalls. Usually you know its bad AFTER you've own the car or eaten the food. :p

And so you're only going by previous reputation, which isn't necessarily in line with actual performance/reliability for this year's models. You can get one year without any problems from Ford or Honda, and the next year's models get mass recalls. It's cyclical.

I mean there was a time when Seagate's rep was stellar, back in the early days of the first Barracuda or some of those late SCSI models. WD was considered slightly underpar then. Now you can say everything is a wash. There's always at least going to be one person who has a lemon, and in today's world where everyone writes a review, there's always going to be an anecdotal story of failure for a specific model. Doesn't make it automatically a bad model. Even the WD red label drives that everyone is fawning over from WD. I had one fail within the first week of deployment.

The only safe thing you can do is backup, backup, backup. I consider the cost of double/triple parity or redundancy to be significantly cheaper than waiting and paying a hard drive recovery company between 1k-2k per drive (speaking from experience).
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Last edited by targeter15 December 13, 2017 at 03:29 PM.
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#13
Quote from targeter15
:
No it is not. Read the legal brief.

And it is extremely specific. If you read the original Backblaze study, Seagate's other drives were pretty much meh or at least in line with other drives. It was the ST3000DM001 specifically @ 3TB. The Barracuda XT @3TB wasn't an outlier. The class action brief only mentions the ST3000DM001 model (Seagate Barracuda 7200.14). These drives have gone out of production. There's really no way to know about hard drive failure pre-purchase. You can only go by trends, gut feeling, and your predilection for certain brand loyalty.

If you look at the studies by Rackspace, Backblaze, Google [googleusercontent.com], Puget, even Imgur, and others, hard drive failure rates vary and often correlated by model, batch, year. By the time they compile the statistics for drives, the drives are already out of production and mostly only relevant for the corporate IT deployment usage where there are still large supplies of spares on hand.

It's still a major bummer to have your drive die, no doubt. But one anecdotal customer experience does not a statistic make. If it did, every hard drive product line and model within those lines should be suspect. I've had WD red label NAS drives die within two months, and conversely budget drives last a while. The vice versa is also true.

If you look at Backblaze's study, the most interesting thing is that they are even using consumer drives, they aren't using the fancy NAS, data center ones. They are using the drives found in Best Buy computers, and shipped by Dell for personal PCs. Google's own data centers also use consumer level drives, they just have triple redundancy. Good model, bad model, always backup.

Think of bad drives kind of like bad cars. By the time the recall is out, the car is out of production already. Like the Ford Explorer a few years back. Horrible safety issues, but limited to a specific year. Does it make all Ford Explorers lemons? No. It's had its fair bit of issues as a model though. But even cars that generally rate high also experience recalls, like the recent Honda Civic recalls in the past few years. Does this mean that future Ford Explorers and Honda Civics are bad? No. The annoying thing for cars like hard drives is that the issues won't be apparently until after-the-fact, when the whole point was avoiding problems by buying a specific model and brand based soley on previous reputation and tangential reviews that evaluate a few days worth of performance and extrapolate long term reliability.
Oh no... I have the same model but 2TB although its still running strong and my main storage drive. Maybe I'm lucky?
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#14
Quote from targeter15
:
I don't trust any brand frankly, and I've long since moved away from RAID 5. Even, RAIDZ2/RAID6 isn't enough any more for me to feel safe. Frankly, double parity not enough anymore. I've moved to using RAIDZ3 arrays, because I want a minimum of triple parity.

Half the problem is that when one drive fails, the chances of another drive failing during rebuild isn't completely uncommon. It's happened once or twice to me. It's becoming more common now because of the use of higher and higher capacity drives, which results in longer and longer rebuild times - more stress on the array. Another reason I'm not too keen on using the 8TB WD red label drives that people have been breaking out of the BB deal. I rather have ten or so 2TB/3TB than four or six 8TB drives.

If you're only going to use a single drive, it's either got to be backed up frequently to the cloud or some other redundant storage, or you pretty much have to be willing to let all that data go down the tubes. Even the highest rated drives have a failure rate, and I'm not willing to roll the dice be it 1 out of 100 or 1 out of 10. The alternative is to be willing to fork out about 1k-2k per drive to let someone like DriveSavers recover the data.
After I get my RAID 5 back to normal, I'm going to pick up some more drives and switch over to RAID 10 to mitigate some of those long rebuild times and 2nd drive failure during rebuild.

But like you point out, those considerations are almost secondary to having a good, working backup. My backup storage unit is also running RAID 5, mainly for the extra capacity over something like RAID 10.
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#15
Quote from targeter15
:
There's no way to know for certainty. By the time the real studies get published like those from Backblaze, the model is already out of production, just like car recalls or food recalls. Usually you know its bad AFTER you've own the car or eaten the food. :p

And so you're only going by previous reputation, which isn't necessarily in line with actual performance/reliability for this year's models. You can get one year without any problems from Ford or Honda, and the next year's models get mass recalls. It's cyclical.

I mean there was a time when Seagate's rep was stellar, back in the early days of the first Barracuda or some of those late SCSI models. WD was considered slightly underpar then. Now you can say everything is a wash. There's always at least going to be one person who has a lemon, and in today's world where everyone writes a review, there's always going to be an anecdotal story of failure for a specific model. Doesn't make it automatically a bad model. Even the WD red label drives that everyone is fawning over from WD. I had one fail within the first week of deployment.

The only safe thing you can do is backup, backup, backup. I consider the cost of double/triple parity or redundancy to be significantly cheaper than waiting and paying a hard drive recovery company between 1k-2k per drive (speaking from experience).
I agree with you, should always keep a backup. But for an average computer user, STAY AWAY FROM SEAGATE 3TB DRIVES and buy the best HDD that you can afford.
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Last edited by neoweb December 13, 2017 at 11:01 PM.
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