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BUFFALO LS220D0202 2TB (2 x 1TB) LinkStation 220 RAID NAS Personal Cloud Storage and Media Server $159.99 AC + Free Shipping

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BUFFALO LS220D0202 2TB (2 x 1TB) LinkStation 220 RAID NAS Personal Cloud Storage and Media Server [newegg.com]
  • $159.99 After Promo Code: NEFPRWU40
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Joined Dec 2009
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#2
1 TB disks in a NAS? In 2018? What a waste.
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#3
Drives are small, true. But the price is similar to WD without any drives. Seems like a decent deal and you can upgrade the drives. And $35 more gets you twice the size drives.
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Last edited by KnightDiver January 12, 2018 at 09:20 AM.
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#4
maybe it's 2.5in drives instead of 3.5in?
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#5
Quote from teaberry
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maybe it's 2.5in drives instead of 3.5in?
nope, pictures and specs clearly show 3.5"
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#6
Can this handle Plex and transcoding 4K?
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#8
Quote from phillylex
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Can this handle Plex and transcoding 4K?
Really for the price?
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#9
Quote from phillylex
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Can this handle Plex and transcoding 4K?
Lol, no it's a 800mhz ARM cpu - it's not going to be your transcoder. It's going to be file storage and delivery.
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#10
I have one of these, little bit of a rocky setup but seems to be able to share pretty good across my network between operating systems - Though I kind of wished I could get extra protection with shutdowns from my UPS.
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HIDDEN amax 01-12-2018 at 01:55 PM
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#12
Quote from amax
:
RAID is dead. Last decade's news. Go SSD (obviously).
That doesn't even make any sense. What use scenario would an SSD replace a RAID array? Speed for a small amount of data? OK. Speed for a large amount of data - RAID or RAID-like wins. Availability - RAID or RAID-like wins. In a NAS, an SSD is usually used for cache acceleration or you can use an SSD RAID array for hot data combined with a traditional HDD RAID array for cold data. Some NAS boxes have separate dedicated 2.5" trays to load your SSDs [qnap.com]into for that purpose. If you're using RAID, you probably need the uptime or speed and are transferring a tremendous amount of data (e.g. raw 4k video), not really a good use case for an SSD.
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HIDDEN amax 01-12-2018 at 03:41 PM
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#14
Quote from amax
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Anyone being competent about storage does a backup to the cloud simultaneous with local storage. Redundancy in a RAID array is last-decade tech. And as for speed, no point in even bothering to argue there. All this in addition to the way that (ignoring boogeyman anecdotes), SSDs literally don't fail until they're due for replacement anyway.
RAID/RAID-like is availability, period. Speed comes with number of drives, configuration, and availability of a cache. SSD will always win in latency.

A 2TB enterprise SSD will cost you about $1k. You can get 12TB of redundant (fully mirrored) enterprise HDDs for the same cost.
Or, if you need the speed, a 500GB enterprise SSD with 8TB of (fully mirrored) enterprise HDDs. The SSD cache should give you a big boost in small write performance in terms of iops and latency but still give you 4x the storage capacity. We're still quite a ways off before SSDs replace "spinning rust" in terms of capacity per dollar.

Backup to "the cloud" is really just an offsite backup and is a good part of any storage strategy but not really relevant.

How would you plan on managing a lot of 4k video where storing a couple files could max out your SSD storage (use case is your working files are larger than any non-cost prohibitive single SSD)? How would you manage a business with 100 online users and, although more reliable than a HDD, your SSD dies? You can restore from the cloud but that will take at least 12 hours to swap out the SSD and redownload everything. You can restore from your local tape backup, but that's not a whole lot faster. Or maybe you have another SSD setup as the local daily backup. Great! You still lose data and have some downtime (i.e. 100 people can't do their jobs [Very expensive!]). A RAID/RAID-like setup will survive and let everyone continue to work while rebuilding.

Sure, there's a lot of issues with traditional RAID and traditional RAID levels are becoming less useful, but that's more to do with increasing storage capacity than anything. If you can't increase the reliability (NRE/URE rate), you're more likely to hit problems during rebuild, so you need to do things like have more parity/redundancy, schedule data scrubbing, etc.

That being said, if you're Average Joe just using your computer to play games and browse the internet and save cat videos, get an SSD. It will be great. Just don't forget the 3-2-1 rule for backups. 3 copies of any important data in 2 different formats (the cloud can count as one) with at least one offsite.

As an aside, anecdotally I'm at 2/4 SSD failures and 2/~30 HDD failures personally (none due to "infant mortality"). I know that doesn't say much other than SSDs can and do fail before the NAND wears out.
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#15
Quote from amax
:
Anyone being competent about storage does a backup to the cloud simultaneous with local storage. Redundancy in a RAID array is last-decade tech. And as for speed, no point in even bothering to argue there. All this in addition to the way that (ignoring boogeyman anecdotes), SSDs literally don't fail until they're due for replacement anyway.
Raid is in no way dead. SSD's are typically not used for storage devices for a reason. SSD's begin to fail immediately upon usage (storage capacity depreciates as usage increases, the more i/o, the faster it dies).

Not a bad little home NAS if you need onsite data storage with redundancy. Device has no encryption though (deal breaker for me).
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Last edited by juicemane_ January 12, 2018 at 05:45 PM.
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