Forum Thread

dynamic and static ip, setup question

492 54 January 19, 2018 at 10:21 AM
Hi all, I have several printers in the workplace that I like to assign static ip addresses so I can manage them remotely. We also have about 50 laptops that come in and go out of our office.

This sometimes becomes an issue because sometimes our printers get turned off (due to a temp. room setup) and a laptop gets assigned the static ip the printer is given. Once both are active at the same time, obviously there will be an ip conflict and the printer won't work.

How do I make sure this doesn't happen with our DHCP server's settings?

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#2
Do you have a windows domain?
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#3
You need to either use DHCP reservations or give the printers IPs outside of your DHCP scope. How you set those up is going to entirely depend on what you're using to provide DHCP services on your network.
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#4
Why are you assigning static IPs that are within the pool handed out by your router? Naughty naughty.
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#5
You do not seem to have a solid understanding how to use DHCP.
Look at this: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/...25(v=ws.11)

Your Printers should have either static IPs or reservations in DHCP.
The laptops should also have short DHCP leases to avoid running out of IPs depending on how you have things set up. You can also do reservations for them and that could help your DNS name resolution if systems have an old cache.

I like to use DHCP for everything with reservations as it makes changing things much easier. Where I work I have about 150 desktops and 30 servers that I need to change the IP due to a complete domain changeover.

They decided to use static IPs when they first set up the systems. I will need to go in, setup DHCP then push a registry change to set the systems to use DHCP.
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#6
Quote from komondor
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You do not seem to have a solid understanding how to use DHCP.
Look at this: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/...25(v=ws.11)

Your Printers should have either static IPs or reservations in DHCP.
The laptops should also have short DHCP leases to avoid running out of IPs depending on how you have things set up. You can also do reservations for them and that could help your DNS name resolution if systems have an old cache.

I like to use DHCP for everything with reservations as it makes changing things much easier. Where I work I have about 150 desktops and 30 servers that I need to change the IP due to a complete domain changeover.

They decided to use static IPs when they first set up the systems. I will need to go in, setup DHCP then push a registry change to set the systems to use DHCP.

You are using DHCP for servers? I just can't imagine that for either web or database servers to say nothing of potential DNS issues related to everything from job streams to ftps, etc. Even with reservations,what happens when some app owner wants to setup a second\new test server and start testing things out by switching dns's or ips around?
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Last edited by YanksIn2009 January 20, 2018 at 05:41 PM.
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#7
I am talking infrastructure not the test lab that is totally different we keep a spreadsheet, and people are assigned a range of IPs to use for test systems. I just had to inventory our lab, 150 Windows systems. Literally took me all day working from home to avoid interruptions.

In my environment if anyone changes an IP on the infrastructure or production servers they could easily find themselves taking some unpaid vacation. Very few people can even log on to the servers.
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#8
Thanks. I set up the reservations for the static ips
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#9
Quote from br1ckhouse
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Thanks. I set up the reservations for the static ips
Reservations and static IPs are different things. DHCP reservation allows you to always assign the same IP address to a device based on it's MAC address. The devices would be set to use DHCP but would always get the same IP.

A static IP is simply an IP address that's manually assigned on the device. I like to change the range on the DHCP server so there's a block of addresses the DHCP server can't use.
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#10
I've always gone with the rule that if a device "Serves" something, then it gets a Static IP.
Printers + Servers would then get an Static IP.

Any laptop or desktop would simply get a Dynamic IP.

(Assuming a Class C addressing space)
As to the DHCP Scope mentioned above, consider this. (Example 192.168.1.1 ~ 192.168.1.254)
Make your DHCP Range for Dynamic IP's 192.168.1.100 ~ 192.168.1.199
Put your Servers with fixed IP's in the 192.168.1.10 though 192.168.1.50 range
Put your Printers with fixed IP's in the 192.168.1.200 though 192.168.1.225 range

So that puts your servers in the 10-50 range, users in the 100-199 range and printers in the 200-225 range.
This allows for
40 Servers (Fixed)
100 Users (Dynamic)
25 Printers (Fixed)

and it still gives you room if you had to expand any of the ranges.
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#11
Quote from NYExcuse
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You need to either use DHCP reservations or give the printers IPs outside of your DHCP scope. How you set those up is going to entirely depend on what you're using to provide DHCP services on your network.

Bingo. Even most consumer routers allow you to set a DHCP range. Then, just make sure the static IP's are "outside" that range and you'll never have a conflict.
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