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help me to decide

106 14 February 6, 2018 at 06:24 AM
ok, out of the loop for awhile. help me to decide what to get next.
I am in need of a new desktop/laptop

I want it to be able to handle the next gen of VR at the same time I want it to be able to handle SolidWorks/creo.(I know i know, yes I want the cake and eat it too) as far as I understand it the GPU good for rendering not so good for VR, the one good for VR don't benefit rendering much.
what I read so far the HTC Vive pro need 1080 to run it.
should i buy pre-built or DIY, i see them all over the map as far as price goes.($1200-1400) what's the a good price point for i7 7th/8th gen, 1080 8gb 16g ram, 128-256ssd with HDD for storage, what price is a must buy?
but i am worry, if I go gtx route the machine will end up not handling the SolidWorks well. i want the capability to play with next gen of VR, but the school still my main focus.

should I go for a desktop or laptop? GTX or quadro or fire pro. of course price is a big part it, still a college student.
any input will be greatly appreciated it.
thanks

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#2
For what your talking about doing I would definitely recommend a Desktop. It will be much cheaper and far more powerful. You also have the added benefit of being able to upgrade it easily as new GPU come out etc. If your capable and willing to support yourself I would build probably. You can probably get a cheaper laptop if you need to take around something with you from class to class and use the desktop for heavy lifting.

It used to be that Gaming GPU while not optimized did decently for 3D modeling especially the higher end ones. Workstation cards are typically terrible for gaming and much more expensive. You should be able to do research and find others accounts of doing what you want to do. It also is probably hard to find an Nvidia GTX 1080 for less then $1000 right now because of all the crypto mining. I think that's the card you mention even though the ram amounts are usually more then 8gb on it.

I would look around here for some build suggestions and put some stuff together on PC Parts Picker. You do need to decide on a budget you want to stay within. https://www.reddit.com/r/buildapc/
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#3
Echoing the previous post, a desktop is absolutely the way to go. As to video cards, if you want to run VR and SolidWorks, you will need the 1080. The workstation cards simply won't handle VR well at all; however the gaming cards will run SolidWorks, although not as quickly as a workstation card. Generally speaking you will get about 50% more performance in SolidWorks from a workstation card when compared to a similarly priced gaming card. While significant, the 1080 is so powerful that it is probably sufficient unless you are rendering very complex models. Keep in mind that SolidWorks does not officially support the 1080 or other gaming cards, so if you run into any glitches don't expect support to be of assistance- they will simply tell you your card is unsupported. Unless you have a particular brand affinity just look around for the best deal from a big name manufacturer for the PC. You might also find a decent deal on a workstation from Dell or HP with a low-end Quadro card installed, in which case you can simply add the 1080. Speaking from experience, the Quadro will happily co-exist with a GTX in a Dell workstation (assuming multiple x16 slots of course). Personally I purchased a Precision workstation with the CPU I wanted, then added an SSD, RAM, and a GTX 1080. I left the Quadro card to drive additional monitors and for any rare cases where I needed a certified and supported workstation card.
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#4
thanks for the replies.
i have a good lead to an i7 gen 7 and 1080 8g for under a grand, but it doesn't have more pci-e slot, i was thinking just go with this setup and if it's a big issue comes up, i will just switch the motherboard and add a Quadro card if they can be co-exists.
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#5
Quote from Clownnut
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thanks for the replies.
i have a good lead to an i7 gen 7 and 1080 8g for under a grand, but it doesn't have more pci-e slot, i was thinking just go with this setup and if it's a big issue comes up, i will just switch the motherboard and add a Quadro card if they can be co-exists.
What system? Most should have a couple of PCI-E slots. What's that card model number exactly? The Nvidia GTX 1080 is generally running $1000 right now new due to crypto. Anything on the used market has likely been mined with heavily.
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#6
not use, brand new. micro atx board and the gtx1080 is just generic.
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Quote from Clownnut
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not use, brand new. micro atx board and the gtx1080 is just generic.
I guess that's possible I was looking at the 1080 Ti that are around $1000 I guess. I would go with a larger motherboard myself to give you more PCI-E slots unless you had a size requirement.
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