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QNAP setup guides for first time users...

1,414 573 February 6, 2018 at 08:51 AM
Hello,

I bought QNAP TS-251 upgraded to 16GB RAM and 2 8TB WD Red drives (from Bestbuy easystore) this holiday.
This is Home use only mostly for Data/Photos/Videos Backup.

First time trying to setup QNAP, during Setup I Choose RAID1
Now after setup is all complete, and firmwares got updated, When i login to QTS it pops a message like Create Snapshot but this doesn't work with my setup.

For New users what are best options to use during setup?
Is it possible to convert to other type after initial setup? and how?
What are Storage pools?

Also i mapped drive to \\QNAP_IP from my Desktop but when i tried to copy files, Speed is like <1mbps..
This seems dead slow.. Any configuration i am missing?
I have TP-Link OnHub AC1900 router.

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#2
You are limited in your raid sets because of only having two drives and it being a 2 bay unit. Not sure if you can connect another drive via USB and have it become part of your pool. Raid 1 is mirroring so it prevents against data loss if one drive fails.

As far as your speed is your desktop wired or wireless? If wired is both the NAS and Computer connected to the same router alone (No switch in the middle)? Transfer speeds will be much slower on small files because of the overhead associated with them but there might be more going on.
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#3
Its Wireless from Desktop. No Switch yet, but plan to have one due to OnHub Router.
TS-251 has 2 ethernet ports, So if i use 2 Ethernet connection from router, this will get any improvements?

When i initialised, I choose Static for Volume.. Since it said best Performance without advance feature.
Is that ok? or Should i switch to Thick or Thin?
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#4
Quote from sakdeals
:
Its Wireless from Desktop. No Switch yet, but plan to have one due to OnHub Router.
TS-251 has 2 ethernet ports, So if i use 2 Ethernet connection from router, this will get any improvements?

When i initialised, I choose Static for Volume.. Since it said best Performance without advance feature.
Is that ok? or Should i switch to Thick or Thin?
Wireless is your problem. Even if you have Wireless AC, wired Ethernet will be faster , more stable, and more reliable. I doubt your router has the ability to team the connection anyways. Wire the computer your trying to move files from/to and you will have better performance. What wireless card do you have in your desktop?

For your application I don't think how you provision the single volume matters. Thin provisioning offers more flexibility if you have more then one volume as you can expand and contract on the fly. Its a very minimal impact either way. Wireless is your major peformance impact.
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#5
Quote from sakdeals
:
Its Wireless from Desktop. No Switch yet, but plan to have one due to OnHub Router.
TS-251 has 2 ethernet ports, So if i use 2 Ethernet connection from router, this will get any improvements?

When i initialised, I choose Static for Volume.. Since it said best Performance without advance feature.
Is that ok? or Should i switch to Thick or Thin?
Plug the NAS into 1 port and your desktop into the other port.
As LR said, your hardware probably won't support running 2 cables from the router to the Desktop...and it might actually confuse it and neither of them would work...or slow it way down. (Can you physically plug them in? Sure, but it's the configuration and hardware support of teaming that is the issue)

Thick or Thin provisioning is something you do on LARGE storage arrays...talking PB's or hundreds of TB's in size.

Thick is simply saying you want a partition/etc to be X size. So that's what is carved out and reserved just for it.

Thin is saying you want up to X size, but let's start with .000X size 1st. As that reaches 100% of .000X, it will then allow it to expand...this happens again and again until it reaches that X size. At that point it's FULL.

Both methodologies have their place, but both have better use cases. Thick is better for Databases. Thin is fine for file servers that need to grow over time, but the performance overhead of growing the size KILLS database performance.

~~~~~~~~~~~
To keep it simple in a home application just provision them Thick and forget about them.
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