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Sigma 70-300mm f4-5.6 DG Macro Telephoto Zoom Lens for Canon, sony, pentax or nikon $129.99 fs @ adorama

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Created 02-09-2018 at 02:39 PM by Cookie21
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11 Comments

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#2
Tell me more about this lens please. I have a Nikon D5300 and I'm wondering if this is better than the Nikon 55-200mm f/4-5.6G ED VR II AF-S DX Nikkor Lens.

Has this lens been discontinued?
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Last edited by balloonshark February 9, 2018 at 02:57 PM.
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#3
[quote]
Quote from balloonshark
:
Tell me more about this lens please. I have a Nikon D5300 and I'm wondering if this is better than the Nikon 55-200mm f/4-5.6G ED VR II AF-S DX Nikkor Lens.

Has this lens been discontinued?
I don't have this specific lens, so no experience with it. Reviews on amazon appear to be quite good, and the price also looks good.
However this is a Sigma DG lens which means that it is a full frame lens. So for an Nikon APS-C camera like your D5300, there is a crop factor of 1.5. It will effectively be 105mm-450mm. Also there is no Image Stabilization on this, so at higher zoom, you will need to use a tripod.
In my not so expert opinion, unless you explicitly need a macro lens, your Nikon 55-200mm is a much better lens than this one simply because it gives you more usable range and has image stabilization.
I have a D7100 and I got a used AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G IF-ED [amazon.com] on Craigslist for around $220 and have been happy with it. That lens also is for full frame so effective range is 105-450, but it has VR and a fast focus, so I can take much sharper photos of wildlife at higher zooms.
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#4
Quote from antifozy
:
I don't have this specific lens, so no experience with it. Reviews on amazon appear to be quite good, and the price also looks good.
However this is a Sigma DG lens which means that it is a full frame lens. So for an Nikon APS-C camera like your D5300, there is a crop factor of 1.5. It will effectively be 105mm-450mm. Also there is no Image Stabilization on this, so at higher zoom, you will need to use a tripod.
In my not so expert opinion, unless you explicitly need a macro lens, your Nikon 55-200mm is a much better lens than this one simply because it gives you more usable range and has image stabilization.
I have a D7100 and I got a used AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G IF-ED [amazon.com] on Craigslist for around $220 and have been happy with it. That lens also is for full frame so effective range is 105-450, but it has VR and a fast focus, so I can take much sharper photos of wildlife at higher zooms.
Thank you for your input. This seems like a really good deal if you have a need or use for this lens. I like that it has a 450mm zoom with my camera body. Not having VR would make it finicky since I don't have stead hands. I guess I'll fight the urge to buy this time.
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#5
It's always bothered me how people throw out full frame equivalence numbers for people using APS-C sensors because they usually end up confusing newcomers who have never used 35mm film cameras. Too many times people are confused into thinking that they need to do math to find out how a full frame lens focal length would look compared to their APS-C lenses. THE FOCAL LENGTH DOES NOT CHANGE, REGARDLESS IF IT IS A FULL FRAME OR CROP LENS! It is a 70-300mm lens no matter what camera you put it on.

This 70-300mm lens will reach further than your 50-200 by about a third. If you imagine your 50-200 as a 1x to 4x zoom, this would be a 1.4x to 6x zoom.

Pentax has in body stabilization that negates lack of lens OIS / IS / VR but for Nikon and Canon I would expect a 50-200mm with VR, IS, etc. to give more usable images. In bright light you could zoom in without motion blur at slower shutter speeds, which would allow lower ISO and less image noise.

That being said, I have the Pentax version of this lens and it's quite usable due to Pentax in body image stabilization. This Sigma is slightly soft on the long end past 200mm. In good light I prefer to crop images from my Pentax 50-200mm which has better image quality, but in medium / low light at long range the Sigma wins since cropped 200mm images have too much noise.

I'm not a Nikon guy, but if I recall this lens is screw drive only, which makes it a manual focus lens on the d3xxx or d5xxx cameras, and auto focus on the d7000 and higher. (Maybe a nikon user can chime in to clear this up.)

If you are willing to buy used you can sometimes find this lens or the similar Tamron, Promaster, Quantaray lenses for even cheaper on a certain auction site. I bought mine used for $40 on e bay in great condition, just minor scuffs on the plastic.
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#6
Quote from TheOneAndOnlyJH
:
It's always bothered me how people throw out full frame equivalence numbers for people using APS-C sensors because they usually end up confusing newcomers who have never used 35mm film cameras. Too many times people are confused into thinking that they need to do math to find out how a full frame lens focal length would look compared to their APS-C lenses. THE FOCAL LENGTH DOES NOT CHANGE, REGARDLESS IF IT IS A FULL FRAME OR CROP LENS! It is a 70-300mm lens no matter what camera you put it on.

This 70-300mm lens will reach further than your 50-200 by about a third. If you imagine your 50-200 as a 1x to 4x zoom, this would be a 1.4x to 6x zoom.
You are right on the focal length of the lens is the same no matter what camera is is mounted to. The rest is incorrect. The apparent focal length on Nikon APS-C is 1.5x. 50mm is normal for FX and is 1x magnification no matter what camera. A crop sensor with a 50mm lens will produce a cropped image equivalent of a 75mm lens or a magnification of 1.5x. The difference between a FX lens and a DX lens is the size of the image illuminating the sensor. The FX sensor (35mm film equivalent) is 1.5x bigger in height and width than DX sensor. The image viewed with a 50mm lens looks normal on a APS-C sensor, but has been "cropped" for image content (no different than cropping and FX image in a photo editor). To get the same content as an FX lens on FX with a DX camera, you would need a lens with the focal length divided by 1.5. A 70-300mm zoom on FX is 1.4x to 6x magnification (divide by 50mm for FX normal). It would be 2.1x to 9x apparent magnification on DX (divide by 33.3mm for DX normal), which is multiplying it by the crop factor. Also, typically a DX lens will not illuminate the whole FX sensor area. The image will have dark corners. Zooms may reach the FX corners past the crop factor (after 105mm w/ 70mm base).
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Last edited by ahannan February 10, 2018 at 07:51 AM.
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#7
Quote from ahannan
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...To get the same content as an FX lens on FX with a DX camera, you would need a lens with the focal length divided by 1.5...
As true as this all is, it doesn't help someone with an APS-C camera who only knows what lenses look like on his camera. (Which is most beginners now... only a small few have had experience with film SLR's.) Since full frame lenses work on crop bodies this crop factor math just confuses more than anything. I know someone who bought a 50mm FX lens because he was told it had a wider field of view, but he was very disappointed when it showed the same view as his 50mm DX lens on his crop body.

Quote from ahannan
:
...Also, typically a DX lens will not illuminate the whole FX sensor area. The image will have dark corners. Zooms may reach the FX corners past the crop factor (after 105mm w/ 70mm base).
This would be worth explaining in a crop lens thread, especially if someone mentions having a full frame body, but it's not very relevant here. (Again, it just confuses new APS-C users.)
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Last edited by TheOneAndOnlyJH February 10, 2018 at 09:15 AM.
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#8
i am wondering how this will be an improvement over my cheapo canon 75-300mm... the focusing distance is 2 feet closer here, which sounds nice

i have one question, hopefully some kind soul can give me an answer

what exactly does the "macro" switch do? what change would occur when i activate that mode? i know the focal length would be limited to a specific range, but what difference would i get between shooting something at 300mm at something 3 feet away(which seems to be its minimum focusing distance), with and without macro mode?

thanks in advance
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Last edited by shounak89 February 10, 2018 at 11:59 PM.

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#9
Quote from shounak89
:
i am wondering how this will be an improvement over my cheapo canon 75-300mm... the focusing distance is 2 feet closer here, which sounds nice

i have one question, hopefully some kind soul can give me an answer

what exactly does the "macro" switch do? what change would occur when i activate that mode? i know the focal length would be limited to a specific range, but what difference would i get between shooting something at 300mm at something 3 feet away(which seems to be its minimum focusing distance), with and without macro mode?

thanks in advance
The macro switch just allows you to focus closer when zoomed beyond 200mm. The advantage of this closer minimum focus distance is the same object can be placed closer to the lens and take up more of the frame to make it bigger in the final picture.

To put it another way, in normal mode the minimum focus might be 5 feet, but in macro mode the minimum focus is 3 ft. Using the macro mode doesn't change the image in any way, it just allows you to focus closer. (I forget the actual minimum focus, but that's the idea.)

The switch on this lens is only mechanical and has no electronics. The only reason the switch is there is to limit the focus travel below 200mm to keep the internal lenses from hitting each other. (Some other macro lenses allow minimum focus throughout the zoom range.)
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Last edited by TheOneAndOnlyJH February 11, 2018 at 03:04 PM.
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#10
Quote from TheOneAndOnlyJH
:
The macro switch just allows you to focus closer when zoomed beyond 200mm. The advantage of this closer minimum focus distance is the same object can be placed closer to the lens and take up more of the frame to make it bigger in the final picture.

To put it another way, in normal mode the minimum focus might be 5 feet, but in macro mode the minimum focus is 3 ft. Using the macro mode doesn't change the image in any way, it just allows you to focus closer. (I forget the actual minimum focus, but that's the idea.)

The switch on this lens is only mechanical and has no electronics. The only reason the switch is there is to limit the focus travel below 200mm to keep the internal lenses from hitting each other. (Some other macro lenses allow minimum focus throughout the zoom range.)
yeah it must move the internals closer to reduce the minimum focusing distance, which means the minimum distance should normally be 5ft or something, so it's not worth it for me

thanks
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#11
Quote from shounak89
:
yeah it must move the internals closer to reduce the minimum focusing distance, which means the minimum distance should normally be 5ft or something, so it's not worth it for me

thanks
I just checked and it's 0.95m (3 ft) minimum for macro and 1.5m (5 ft) for normal. The macro range covers the whole range between 200mm-300mm though.
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#12
Quote from TheOneAndOnlyJH
:
I just checked and it's 0.95m (3 ft) minimum for macro and 1.5m (5 ft) for normal. The macro range covers the whole range between 200mm-300mm though.
thanks for the info
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