Forum Thread

No Signal from Outdoor Antenna but works Indoors

274 124 March 9, 2018 at 08:05 PM
So, here is my story about the monoprice outdoor antenna I purchased from a hot deal.

The antenna works indoors, meaning that when I scan for channels via the TV it pulls up 20+ channels.

Then I hooked it up to the outdoor box (there is a free cable) and the scan pulled up 0 channels.

Now, the indoor and outdoor location of the antenna is exactly the same just separated by the home wall/window.

So, I then purchased a jonard continuity tester to check the connection from outside to the inside jack and confirmed it was good.

Can someone please verify what I am doing wrong? I can't understand why the same antenna/cable combo works indoors but not outdoors (in pretty much the same location).

My last step is to open up the window and pass the cable from the antenna outside into the interior jack to confirm if it works or not. But it still won't solve my problem as to why there is no signal when connected to a seemingly good outdoor connection.

DS

DS

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#2
Sounds like you're trying to connect an antenna to a cable tv line that may have some type of active service from the cable company (cable internet for example). This is a very bad idea, it could mess with your internet and make your cable company angry.

You could also be connecting it to the wrong part of a splitter.

If you want to use some of your coax wiring for an antenna and some for cable you need to separate the two.

A few pictures might help.
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#3
Quote from jkee
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Sounds like you're trying to connect an antenna to a cable tv line that may have some type of active service from the cable company (cable internet for example). This is a very bad idea, it could mess with your internet and make your cable company angry.

You could also be connecting it to the wrong part of a splitter.

If you want to use some of your coax wiring for an antenna and some for cable you need to separate the two.

A few pictures might help.
Thanks for your reply! I do not have cable service plus internet is on Fiber which is a separate box. I have added 2 pics. You can see the splitters are empty. The outdoor antenna is connected to a cable which in turn connects to the indoor jack (verified this with the continuity tester).

I even did a test to confirm the interior jack is good.

DS
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#4
run new wire to it
search for channels again when you put it outside
move the anthennas as trees will block signal
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Quote from DealSpice
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Thanks for your reply! I do not have cable service plus internet is on Fiber which is a separate box. I have added 2 pics. You can see the splitters are empty. The outdoor antenna is connected to a cable which in turn connects to the indoor jack (verified this with the continuity tester).

I even did a test to confirm the interior jack is good.

DS
Those aren't splitters, those are grounding blocks. Fiber sometimes uses Coax to enter the building.

One thing I noticed was the sharpie that says "On Q" (if I read that correctly). This makes me wonder if you have a structured wiring cabinet somewhere inside the house, but it could have meant something else to whoever wrote it.

How many cable jacks do you have inside the house? How many of those jacks are you hoping to distribute the antenna signal to?
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#6
Quote from phillint
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run new wire to it
search for channels again when you put it outside
move the anthennas as trees will block signal
I tried new wire as well. Note that the indoor to outdoor location is just a couple of feet. But connecting it to the outside wire gets 0 channels while connecting it to the tv gets 20+ channels (again, location is nearly the same).
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Quote from jkee
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Those aren't splitters, those are grounding blocks. Fiber sometimes uses Coax to enter the building.

One thing I noticed was the sharpie that says "On Q" (if I read that correctly). This makes me wonder if you have a structured wiring cabinet somewhere inside the house, but it could have meant something else to whoever wrote it.

How many cable jacks do you have inside the house? How many of those jacks are you hoping to distribute the antenna signal to?
Those are grounding blocks, even with the coax connectors? At least in my home, Fiber uses the phone wiring. And there is a structured wiring cabinet in one of the closets. Fiber has the connection from here to the router. I do see the On Q lettering, not sure what it meant.

2 jacks on the ground floor and 5 on the top floor. Why does the continuity test confirm the cable is good (used the jonard PT-300 tool to test)? This is the test I did, fwd to 1:15:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yeluFiZTvUg


DS
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#8
Antennas have two sides. Point both sides, scan.
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#9
What antenna specifically are you using?

More pictures might help, how about some pictures of each part of the working and non-working setup.
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#10
Quote from jkee
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What antenna specifically are you using?

More pictures might help, how about some pictures of each part of the working and non-working setup.
This is the one:

https://www.monoprice.com/product?p_id=24172

DS
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Quote from DealSpice
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This is the one:

https://www.monoprice.com/product?p_id=24172

DS
Plug your address in here: http://www.tvfool.com/index.php?o...&Itemid=29
to see how you should aim the antenna.
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#12
Another thing to note is to take a look inside and see if you have splitters. You probably do as it's very common for a house to have more then one cable jack and the cable company leaves them behind typically. Every time you go through a splitter you loose signal, depending on the splitter you might loose more. For instance a 1 to 4 would loose more then a 1 to 2. Also the loss is not always even. Without an amp your OTA antenna signals are probably too weak to split. I would recommend setting it up direct to the TV your testing on first and then you can figure out amp and splitting if needed.
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Quote from LiquidRetro
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Another thing to note is to take a look inside and see if you have splitters. You probably do as it's very common for a house to have more then one cable jack and the cable company leaves them behind typically. Every time you go through a splitter you loose signal, depending on the splitter you might loose more. For instance a 1 to 4 would loose more then a 1 to 2. Also the loss is not always even. Without an amp your OTA antenna signals are probably too weak to split. I would recommend setting it up direct to the TV your testing on first and then you can figure out amp and splitting if needed.
It seems very likely that there are splitters in the On Q cabinet, they can also just be burried in the wall.

If the OP used their test tool correctly, in theory they should be able to tell if there's a splitter.
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#14
Put tv outside, connect the antenna, test.
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#15
You may need a signal booster/powered antenna. The antenna will need power in order to backfeed your entire coaxial network. Each splitter will drop the signal by about half..
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