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Target.com: Miracle-Gro 1001233 All Purpose Plant Food - 5 Pound - $8.89 Free In-Store pickup

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Available on Target's website right now with free in-store pickup:

https://www.target.com/p/miracle-...lsrc=aw.ds

Previously listed available on Amazon as well, but out of stock on Amazon now.
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Our community has rated this post as helpful. If you agree, why not rep Mr. Harley?
#2
Miracle-Gro branded water soluble fertilizer is horribly overpriced. If you have any farm supply stores you should be able to get a much better price for a water soluble fertilizer, and I suspect you can also find a better buy at hydroponics or stores that supply cannabis growing. You'll want a 20-25 pound bag of 20-20-20. I haven't used this for over 10 years as I compost up to 50 cubic feet a year, so I am not up on prices but when I last purchased some it was under $20 for 25 pounds, which is 5 times as much as the OP. Just remember it must be kept totally dry. A humid basement is not a good idea, though a good watertight deck box has worked for me.

FYI the OP is nitrogen heavy, and given the mix it should be good for flowers, alright for lawns and leafy crops, but not recommended for any other kind of vegetable. You'll typically want a more balanced 20-20-20 for those.
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Last edited by Mr. Harley March 11, 2018 at 09:32 PM. Reason: italics added to clarify I am comparing water soluble to water soluble fertilizers
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#3
dead anyways and props for the above post.
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#4
Quote from Mr. Harley
:
Miracle-Gro branded water soluble fertilizer is horribly overpriced. If you have any farm supply stores you should be able to get a much better price, and I suspect you can also find a better buy at hydroponics or stores that supply cannabis growing. You'll want a 20-25 pound bag of 20-20-20. I haven't used this for over 10 years as I compost up to 50 cubic feet a year, so I am not up on prices but when I last purchased some it was under $20 for 25 pounds, which is 5 times as much as the OP. Just remember it must be kept totally dry. A humid basement is not a good idea, though a good watertight deck box has worked for me.

FYI the OP is nitrogen heavy, and given the mix it should be good for flowers, alright for lawns and leafy crops, but not recommended for any other kind of vegetable. You'll typically want a more balanced 20-20-20 for those.
Totally wrong. No plant needs as much phosphorus as they do Nitrogen or Potassium. Actually many states are outlawing phosphorous in certain fertilizers because of its inability to break down in the soil and because it causes excessive growth of algae in waterways rivers and lakes. So a 20-20-20 mix or 1-1-1 ratio needs to be avoided. As far as MG product, not all NPK are created equal and many cheaper ones like those from ag supply stores have a lot of water-insoluble fertilizers just to make the NPK numbers look good. Miracle-Gro is a very high-end fertilizer, I have a Horticulture degree and worked in the field for years and highly trust their product commercially and especially for homeowners.

On that note, the price listed is right along with what the big box stores currently sell the 5 lb. bag of water soluble fertilizer.
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#5
Sold out
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Dead,
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#7
Target still has it.
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Thank you, Original Post updated to reflect only available at Target now.
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#9
Quote from garej704
:
Totally wrong. No plant needs as much phosphorus as they do Nitrogen or Potassium. Actually many states are outlawing phosphorous in certain fertilizers because of its inability to break down in the soil and because it causes excessive growth of algae in waterways rivers and lakes. So a 20-20-20 mix or 1-1-1 ratio needs to be avoided. As far as MG product, not all NPK are created equal and many cheaper ones like those from ag supply stores have a lot of water-insoluble fertilizers just to make the NPK numbers look good. Miracle-Gro is a very high-end fertilizer, I have a Horticulture degree and worked in the field for years and highly trust their product commercially and especially for homeowners.

On that note, the price listed is right along with what the big box stores currently sell the 5 lb. bag of water soluble fertilizer.
Since I had edited my original post and didn't realize I had deleted that, and just to make it explicit - I was comparing water soluble fertilizers. Comparing regular broadcast fertilizer to water soluble would be inane, and I've gone back an corrected that so thanks (and noted the correction in italics and remarks). You make one very good point, and then get caught where your second statement makes the first suspect.

If the phosphorus isn't water soluble, then it's not going to create an algae bloom very easily, is it? If it does, then it can make a noticeable difference for plants. So which is it? Phosphorus has been added to fertilizer for centuries often at great expense. Especially after intense farming, phosphorus can easily be depleted, and routinely makes a substantial difference.

While I didn't go the horticulture route, just having had general botany courses for dual biology and chemistry degrees, I also took both organic and physical chemistry. I'll argue that soil amendments of any type are will typically become bio-available given the right conditions, it's simply a matter of the soil chemistry and the actual plants you are growing. A good example is compost and acid soil with raised bed gardening, and leaching issues from the wood products you used to make the raised bed. A pressure treated timber that could be perfectly fine for a deck while leaching toxic chemicals very quickly with a moist, highly organic acid soil as is typical for raised beds.

BTW I am very aware of the problems caused by phosphorus runoff, though I didn't know certain states are limiting it depending on the application. Controlling non-point sources of water pollution sucks. It will not effect me because, as I noted, I create largish quantities of compost, but it is useful to know. I was going to suggest soil testing in my first post, as that is what you really need to know for the proper application of soil amendments, but I thought about it and realized people getting Miracle Grow typically are NOT the people planning to go to their county Agricultural Extension Agent. You do realize that a fertilizer high in water soluble nitrogen (like Miracle-Gro) is more likely to cause runoff issues and algal blooms when used by the typical consumer than a more typical fertilizer product, don't you?

The claim an ag supply store fertilizer being less reliable than a mass market consumer fertilizer is simply mind boggling. Modern farmers are hyper-aware of the value of what they spreading, and will test, test, and then test again to make sure of what they have. If a fertilizer does not create the promised results, they will quickly change to another one. A farmer who doesn't do this is called - "bankrupt." FYI and I've actually posted on this, my uncle has grown seed crops for a large ag conglomerate, and we visited him every summer during my childhood and teen years. I've seen a medium scale highly successful operation.

Depending on what happens with my spine (I have early onset spinal degeneration everywhere below L1), I am right on the cusp of qualifying as an organic small farm. In fact I am having to shop for insurance this year for exactly that reason, to protect myself for product liability. My two children put in a LOT of work helping out. I have put in 160 feet of terraced rain gardens 10-12 feet wide utilizing grants, as well as numerous beds and other areas of berries. As I noted, I am well aware of the runoff issues.

Currently I have over 20 mature blueberry bushes, plus another 32 - 2 year old plants I put in last year. I have over 120 row feet of blackberries (Arkansas Univ. cultivars), and 160+ feet of elderberries I am doing a test plot on for our area (North Central Kentucky). I am also experimenting with both Highbush Cranberry as well as Viburnum nudum cultivars, and am trying gooseberries and ligonberries. We also have a naturalized plot of Mulberries, both white and red, and I have one that is mostly red (I am assuming it has white mulberry genes as pure examples are increasingly rare this far south) that I would like to get out there due to the excellent taste.

None of this includes my vegetable and flower gardens, the latter of which are thankfully low maintenance. While I would say you have better experience with the consumer market, and probably the landscaping market, I do know what I'm talking about for serious gardening and small fruit production. The high level of nitrogen in Miracle-Gro is more than most people need for the majority of vegetables out there. The ratios are different than what is recommended for most gardening, though as I noted that the OP would probably be good for leafy vegetable crops. I would have guessed also for Cannabis, but since I'm not sure how much they stress the flowering portions vs. leaves, I didn't want to give bad advice. For house and landscape plants this is a perfectly good product but overpriced except on a small scale.

It would definitely green up a lawn, but the typical lawn product stresses nitrogen even more. If you are growing a lawn, you'd do better to forgo the herbicides and add inoculated white clover as a natural nitrogen fixer. In fact it used to be considered as part of a healthy lawn, before herbicides become so prevalent and the Ag Chemical companies pushed them. That is an even better way to prevent run-off issues. Big Grin
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Same price on Amazon. I bought one yesterday. Sorry, apparently it sold out after I bought
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Last edited by tripham989 March 12, 2018 at 01:40 AM.
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Thank you
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Quote from Mr. Harley
:
Since I had edited my original post and didn't realize I had deleted that, and just to make it explicit - I was comparing water soluble fertilizers. Comparing regular broadcast fertilizer to water soluble would be inane, and I've gone back an corrected that so thanks (and noted the correction in italics and remarks). You make one very good point, and then get caught where your second statement makes the first suspect.

If the phosphorus isn't water soluble, then it's not going to create an algae bloom very easily, is it? If it does, then it can make a noticeable difference for plants. So which is it? Phosphorus has been added to fertilizer for centuries often at great expense. Especially after intense farming, phosphorus can easily be depleted, and routinely makes a substantial difference.

While I didn't go the horticulture route, just having had general botany courses for dual biology and chemistry degrees, I also took both organic and physical chemistry. I'll argue that soil amendments of any type are will typically become bio-available given the right conditions, it's simply a matter of the soil chemistry and the actual plants you are growing. A good example is compost and acid soil with raised bed gardening, and leaching issues from the wood products you used to make the raised bed. A pressure treated timber that could be perfectly fine for a deck while leaching toxic chemicals very quickly with a moist, highly organic acid soil as is typical for raised beds.

BTW I am very aware of the problems caused by phosphorus runoff, though I didn't know certain states are limiting it depending on the application. Controlling non-point sources of water pollution sucks. It will not effect me because, as I noted, I create largish quantities of compost, but it is useful to know. I was going to suggest soil testing in my first post, as that is what you really need to know for the proper application of soil amendments, but I thought about it and realized people getting Miracle Grow typically are NOT the people planning to go to their county Agricultural Extension Agent. You do realize that a fertilizer high in water soluble nitrogen (like Miracle-Gro) is more likely to cause runoff issues and algal blooms when used by the typical consumer than a more typical fertilizer product, don't you?

The claim an ag supply store fertilizer being less reliable than a mass market consumer fertilizer is simply mind boggling. Modern farmers are hyper-aware of the value of what they spreading, and will test, test, and then test again to make sure of what they have. If a fertilizer does not create the promised results, they will quickly change to another one. A farmer who doesn't do this is called - "bankrupt." FYI and I've actually posted on this, my uncle has grown seed crops for a large ag conglomerate, and we visited him every summer during my childhood and teen years. I've seen a medium scale highly successful operation.

Depending on what happens with my spine (I have early onset spinal degeneration everywhere below L1), I am right on the cusp of qualifying as an organic small farm. In fact I am having to shop for insurance this year for exactly that reason, to protect myself for product liability. My two children put in a LOT of work helping out. I have put in 160 feet of terraced rain gardens 10-12 feet wide utilizing grants, as well as numerous beds and other areas of berries. As I noted, I am well aware of the runoff issues.

Currently I have over 20 mature blueberry bushes, plus another 32 - 2 year old plants I put in last year. I have over 120 row feet of blackberries (Arkansas Univ. cultivars), and 160+ feet of elderberries I am doing a test plot on for our area (North Central Kentucky). I am also experimenting with both Highbush Cranberry as well as Viburnum nudum cultivars, and am trying gooseberries and ligonberries. We also have a naturalized plot of Mulberries, both white and red, and I have one that is mostly red (I am assuming it has white mulberry genes as pure examples are increasingly rare this far south) that I would like to get out there due to the excellent taste.

None of this includes my vegetable and flower gardens, the latter of which are thankfully low maintenance. While I would say you have better experience with the consumer market, and probably the landscaping market, I do know what I'm talking about for serious gardening and small fruit production. The high level of nitrogen in Miracle-Gro is more than most people need for the majority of vegetables out there. The ratios are different than what is recommended for most gardening, though as I noted that the OP would probably be good for leafy vegetable crops. I would have guessed also for Cannabis, but since I'm not sure how much they stress the flowering portions vs. leaves, I didn't want to give bad advice. For house and landscape plants this is a perfectly good product but overpriced except on a small scale.

It would definitely green up a lawn, but the typical lawn product stresses nitrogen even more. If you are growing a lawn, you'd do better to forgo the herbicides and add inoculated white clover as a natural nitrogen fixer. In fact it used to be considered as part of a healthy lawn, before herbicides become so prevalent and the Ag Chemical companies pushed them. That is an even better way to prevent run-off issues. Big Grin
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