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DeerBlock Deer Netting and Fencing (Reusable Protection For Trees and Shrubs From Animals) 7 feet x 100 feet $15.67 FS w/ Prime @Amazon

$15.67
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https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00004RA0N/
  • Tough durable deer netting; Protects landscape and crops from deer and other animals
  • Economical, lightweight deer protection; Black UV-resistant deer netting
  • Reusable mesh deer fence; Stops deer and other animals from eating shrubs, berries, and vegetables
  • Easy to use roll of deer fence netting; Attaches easily to posts and trees
  • Do it yourself deer netting for protecting trees, shrubs, orchards and crops
  • Protects landscapes from deer
  • Stops animals from damaging garden areas
  • Easy to install, and reuse
  • UV- resistant
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Created 04-30-2018 at 08:36 PM by Fok
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4 Comments

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Heads up, and I learned this the hard way. This is more for rows of vegetables or maybe a low fruit like strawberries, though the red-tailed hawk that's moved into the area solved the rabbit problem which is often worse on these smaller plants.

Think about it. At 7' wide, that means after you anchor the bottom edges (you'll lose about a foot after doing both sides), and then you lose the distance across the top of the plant. By the time you are done, you'll be lucky to cover a plant 2 1/2 ft tall.

If you are growing bush fruits like blackberries and blueberries, you want the 13-14 foot wide stuff, and birds will be a bigger problem (though deer can devastate a thornless blackberry planting overnight). My biggest problem with raspberries is voles burrowing and eating the roots, and no fencing is going to solve that problem (just had a barred owl couple move in, so I'm hoping for some relief there).

Using the 14 foot wide stuff on our blueberries has probably more than tripled what my kids get. When we put it in last year, my daughter had a catbird stalking her and trying to swoop into the bushes to get fruit if she uncovered two or three bushes at a time. When she got wise to it the bird sat up on a post and scolded her for over an hour. We also had a robin sneak in under the edge and get tangled, and upon further reading I discovered they are major pests on small fruit plants.

I've not grown dwarfed fruit trees, so 14 foot wide may be wide enough for them, but for a standard fruit true you're very likely going to want 20 to 30 ft square nets. For cherries you definitely want to consider big nets. You must close the bottom off, as clever birds like bluejays will fly up under the netting up into the gap and just take a gouge out of the cherry, and then drop in to the ground.

You'll want to fence your trunks if your deer problem is severe enough they are stripping the bark and girdling the tree (killing it). Remember, they can stand up on their hind legs sometimes to browse low branches or get over your trunk protection. One person in our area who actually runs a small specialty farm with organic greens and specialty corn uses electric fence line at the top of a four foot mesh barrier. The mesh keeps out rabbits and keeps deer from sneaking under, and getting their snouts shocked seems to keep the deer from trying jump it. They may use a dual electric line on the top, it's been a few years since I visited them.

Deer eat my tomatoes (they also love morning glories). If I plant disease resistant cultivars of tomatoes to distract the deer, they leave the blueberries alone. They have learned to go to open style tomato cages I have and use them as guides where to munch. I once had a 10 minute monolog with a deer maybe a dozen feet away that came out of the woods at the edge of our plants when I was weeding, and while it stared at me I informed it in a gentle, cajoling voice that if I had my 9mm with me I would gladly shoot it and it could feed me since I've been feeding it. Big Grin
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Quote from Mr. Harley
:
Heads up, and I learned this the hard way. This is more for rows of vegetables or maybe a low fruit like strawberries, though the red-tailed hawk that's moved into the area solved the rabbit problem which is often worse on these smaller plants.

Think about it. At 7' wide, that means after you anchor the bottom edges (you'll lose about a foot after doing both sides), and then you lose the distance across the top of the plant. By the time you are done, you'll be lucky to cover a plant 2 1/2 ft tall.

If you are growing bush fruits like blackberries and blueberries, you want the 13-14 foot wide stuff, and birds will be a bigger problem (though deer can devastate a thornless blackberry planting overnight). My biggest problem with raspberries is voles burrowing and eating the roots, and no fencing is going to solve that problem (just had a barred owl couple move in, so I'm hoping for some relief there).

Using the 14 foot wide stuff on our blueberries has probably more than tripled what my kids get. When we put it in last year, my daughter had a catbird stalking her and trying to swoop into the bushes to get fruit if she uncovered two or three bushes at a time. When she got wise to it the bird sat up on a post and scolded her for over an hour. We also had a robin sneak in under the edge and get tangled, and upon further reading I discovered they are major pests on small fruit plants.

I've not grown dwarfed fruit trees, so 14 foot wide may be wide enough for them, but for a standard fruit true you're very likely going to want 20 to 30 ft square nets. For cherries you definitely want to consider big nets. You must close the bottom off, as clever birds like bluejays will fly up under the netting up into the gap and just take a gouge out of the cherry, and then drop in to the ground.

You'll want to fence your trunks if your deer problem is severe enough they are stripping the bark and girdling the tree (killing it). Remember, they can stand up on their hind legs sometimes to browse low branches or get over your trunk protection. One person in our area who actually runs a small specialty farm with organic greens and specialty corn uses electric fence line at the top of a four foot mesh barrier. The mesh keeps out rabbits and keeps deer from sneaking under, and getting their snouts shocked seems to keep the deer from trying jump it. They may use a dual electric line on the top, it's been a few years since I visited them.

Deer eat my tomatoes (they also love morning glories). If I plant disease resistant cultivars of tomatoes to distract the deer, they leave the blueberries alone. They have learned to go to open style tomato cages I have and use them as guides where to munch. I once had a 10 minute monolog with a deer maybe a dozen feet away that came out of the woods at the edge of our plants when I was weeding, and while it stared at me I informed it in a gentle, cajoling voice that if I had my 9mm with me I would gladly shoot it and it could feed me since I've been feeding it. Big Grin
What can I do about squirrels in our three 4x12ft raised beds? Considering netting over the entire garden area, enough to stand in.
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Quote from ezekiel3714
:
What can I do about squirrels in our three 4x12ft raised beds? Considering netting over the entire garden area, enough to stand in.
Squirrels and chipmunks can be really tough. Chipmunks thankfully only dig, and to keep them out of bulbs plant hardware cloth - galvanized steel, about 1/2" - on top of them. This will also help with squirrels if you have a digging problem. You can also make an arch of chicken wire or hardware cloth to keep squirrels off of your vegetables until they are large enough to at least survive some gnawing.

You can also set mouse traps (chipmunks) and should be able to use rat trips with squirrels though again you may want to check on the squirrel part, some places are a little strange about squirrels. You have to be careful, though, as some birds - like woodpeckers and tufted titmice - are attracted to some of the same foods and if you use a feeder can move vertically and activate the trap.

The best way to deal with squirrels (and raccoons) in my experience is pellet guns. BB guns might work with a squirrel, but remember you will only get to hurt them once, as they will learn. It's typically better to kill them. One problem then becomes sight lines, i.e. keep the pellets in your yard if you miss (and I have had them hear me and jump out of the way more than once). The other is your local game and varmint/nuisance animal laws.

In many states both squirrels and raccoons (and rabbits) have been hunted for meat and/or skins. There are often seasons and you require a hunting/trapping permit. Just look into your local laws, and/or don't be blatant about it. If none of these will work, you might try running some kind of combo metal fencing and electric fencing stretched over the top I'm guessing? Poison is generally a bad idea unless it is explicitly legal for a non-licensed applicator in your area, and even then make sure other animals you don't want to kill are not tempted by the bait. I used to use a pellet gun, but between the barred owl and red-tailed hawk they largely ceased being a problem. Smilie

Just did a quick search. I have over 150 feet of daffodils in my yard, replanted from an 20 year old overgrown bed when I moved here. I like them near wooded areas as they are poisonous and are pretty much left alone by everything. I just checked and supposedly squirrels don't like the odors of marigolds, allium, snow crocus, jonquils, and finally Crown Imperial (Kaiser's Crown) also repel them, though I've never heard of the last one. I am a little skeptical about these plants always working to drive away squirrels, but at least you'll have something survive hug
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is this something that you would like to do
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