Amazon Prime Day Check out the best Prime Day deals now! See Deals
Forum Thread
Amazon Discounts, Deals and Coupon Codes

Seeking Advice - New Home construction Network

4 10 May 15, 2018 at 10:35 AM Get Amazon Coupons
Hi All,

I am building a new home and looking for input on my Network. I have (22) runs of CAT6 ethernet to TV/Computer/other. I have (8) runs of CAT6 ethernet for PoE security cameras. Everything goes to a central location to a walk-in closet upstairs. 30 runs of CAT6 total.

My 22 runs of CAT6 will go through a switch, while the (8) runs of CAT6 for PoE cameras will go directly to the camera system NVR.

I need to order all hardware (modem, router, switch, patch panel, RJ45 connectors) and racks to mount everything. I'm looking for recommendations on what I have planned. I'm attaching a rough conceptual sketch.

Here are links
Modem: Net Gear CM500
https://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-CM...B00R92CEVU

Router: Net Gear R7000P
https://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-Ni...B01NA80JML

Rack: 11.5" deep, expandable height
https://www.amazon.com/of/dp/B018...=UTF8&th=1

Surge Protector/ Power strip:
https://www.amazon.com/long-power...xt?ie=UTF8

Patch Panel:
https://www.amazon.com/patch-pane...xt?ie=UTF8

24 port switch: For TV/Comupter/etc CAT6 feeds
https://www.amazon.com/gigabit-Et...xt?ie=UTF8

Camera feeds will go directly to NVR on security camera. Do the camera feeds need to go through a switch?

Rack shelves for unrackable hardware:
https://www.amazon.com/gigabit-Et...xt?ie=UTF8

Co-ax signal splitter: I do have 5 runs of Coax going to TV locations that the builder ran.
https://www.amazon.com/8-port-amp...xt?ie=UTF8

Am I missing any major components? Thanks for any input.

Most everything behind the walls has been installed. Sprayfoam installation will be next week. I am aiming to have all this figured out soon.
Thanks all.
Don't have Amazon Prime? Students can get a free 6-Month Amazon Prime trial with free 2-day shipping, unlimited video streaming & more. If you're not a student, there's also a free 1-Month Amazon Prime trial available.

16 Comments

1 2

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jul 2003
L10: Grand Master
34,224 Posts
6,108 Reputation
#2
Quote from deal_meister
:
Hi All,

I am building a new home and looking for input on my Network. I have (22) runs of CAT6 ethernet to TV/Computer/other. I have (8) runs of CAT6 ethernet for PoE security cameras. Everything goes to a central location to a walk-in closet upstairs. 30 runs of CAT6 total.

My 22 runs of CAT6 will go through a switch, while the (8) runs of CAT6 for PoE cameras will go directly to the camera system NVR.

I need to order all hardware (modem, router, switch, patch panel, RJ45 connectors) and racks to mount everything. I'm looking for recommendations on what I have planned. I'm attaching a rough conceptual sketch.

Here are links
Modem: Net Gear CM500
https://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-CM...B00R92CEVU

Router: Net Gear R7000P
https://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-Ni...B01NA80JML

Rack: 11.5" deep, expandable height
https://www.amazon.com/of/dp/B018...=UTF8&th=1

Surge Protector/ Power strip:
https://www.amazon.com/long-power...xt?ie=UTF8

Patch Panel:
https://www.amazon.com/patch-pane...xt?ie=UTF8

24 port switch: For TV/Comupter/etc CAT6 feeds
https://www.amazon.com/gigabit-Et...xt?ie=UTF8

Camera feeds will go directly to NVR on security camera. Do the camera feeds need to go through a switch?

Rack shelves for unrackable hardware:
https://www.amazon.com/gigabit-Et...xt?ie=UTF8

Co-ax signal splitter: I do have 5 runs of Coax going to TV locations that the builder ran.
https://www.amazon.com/8-port-amp...xt?ie=UTF8

Am I missing any major components? Thanks for any input.

Most everything behind the walls has been installed. Sprayfoam installation will be next week. I am aiming to have all this figured out soon.
Thanks all.
I quickly checked your list...the item that I see a potential problem with is the 24 port panel

It has Krone connectors on the back of the IDIC clips...this is custom to Krone...
I'd go with a panel that uses standard 110 IDIC clips aka C-4 clips for the cables to terminate on. Not that Krone Connectors are bad, but they are custom and need a Krone Punch tool just to terminate the cables on to it.

The jacks you'll get are most likely going to be 110 style, so you'd need 2 tools to terminate the cables, 1 at the panel and the other at the jack.

Look at Leviton panels. They are one of the 3 or 4 industry leaders in Telecom and typically you can get their jacks at Home Depot, etc...

Also you can mix brands of Panels and Jacks since you are not putting in a certified structured cabling system that would be have an End to End warranty by the manufacture as you are not a certified installer. (Panel can be brand x vs. Jack could be Brand Y...but you'd use all the same Jacks as they need to fit the faceplates)
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
worshipTHANK YOU to those whom have fought and are fighting for our FREEDOMworship

Please Support Autism Awareness [autismspeaks.org]
Yahoo!Yahoo! 7/11/2009
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Feb 2004
L10: Grand Master
6,962 Posts
972 Reputation
#3
Quote from deal_meister
:
Hi All,

I am building a new home and looking for input on my Network. I have (22) runs of CAT6 ethernet to TV/Computer/other. I have (8) runs of CAT6 ethernet for PoE security cameras. Everything goes to a central location to a walk-in closet upstairs. 30 runs of CAT6 total.

My 22 runs of CAT6 will go through a switch, while the (8) runs of CAT6 for PoE cameras will go directly to the camera system NVR.

I need to order all hardware (modem, router, switch, patch panel, RJ45 connectors) and racks to mount everything. I'm looking for recommendations on what I have planned. I'm attaching a rough conceptual sketch.

Here are links
Modem: Net Gear CM500
https://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-CM...B00R92CEVU

Router: Net Gear R7000P
https://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-Ni...B01NA80JML

Rack: 11.5" deep, expandable height
https://www.amazon.com/of/dp/B018...=UTF8&th=1

Surge Protector/ Power strip:
https://www.amazon.com/long-power...xt?ie=UTF8

Patch Panel:
https://www.amazon.com/patch-pane...xt?ie=UTF8

24 port switch: For TV/Comupter/etc CAT6 feeds
https://www.amazon.com/gigabit-Et...xt?ie=UTF8

Camera feeds will go directly to NVR on security camera. Do the camera feeds need to go through a switch?

Rack shelves for unrackable hardware:
https://www.amazon.com/gigabit-Et...xt?ie=UTF8

Co-ax signal splitter: I do have 5 runs of Coax going to TV locations that the builder ran.
https://www.amazon.com/8-port-amp...xt?ie=UTF8

Am I missing any major components? Thanks for any input.

Most everything behind the walls has been installed. Sprayfoam installation will be next week. I am aiming to have all this figured out soon.
Thanks all.
Your patch panel is cat 5/5e, not cat 6. Probably doesn't matter much for the home user, but if you're putting in cat 6 wiring, you may want to get cat 6 everything.

Your schematic looks good, it's got all the pieces you need.

Have you considered the possible need for access points? Would those go on one of the 22 ports off the switch, or are all those spoken for? If they're all spoken for, run a few more drops and get a bigger patch panel and switch.

Did you run the cables in conduit? If so, I'd look at a 48-port patch panel rather than 24, just for a little future-proofing. Easy enough to switch out a switch for a bigger one, but switching out a patch panel would be a PITA. If you didn't run conduit, it's not likely you'll add any new drops, so the 24-port is fine.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Marshall: Have the rest of you guys figured out by now that mmathis is the smartest guy on SlickDeals?
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Oct 2007
Get over it
5,277 Posts
2,241 Reputation
#4
I agree with DC about using Leviton or similar, non-proprietary parts. I also agree with mmathis about the Cat6 patch panel. Functionally, there's no real difference between the 2... except that the spacing on the Cat6 is a little larger to accommodate the larger diameter Cat6 wire. So you can get wires that "look" like their punched down good, but not actually making a good connection. Plus, it's only a few bucks more for the Cat6... not worth the headache of troubleshooting intermittent issues later on down the road, after enough expansion/retraction happens.

And just curious, was there a reason you opted to go with a wall mount rack instead of an On-Q style recessed box to house everything?... like this
https://www.amazon.com/Leviton-47...RGK0VTSC6N

Even though everything is in a closet, that rack is still going to take up a lot of space. The recessed OnQ style setup only occupies the unused space in between wall studs, and come in sizes up to 42", which should be plenty to house all your wiring and components. Or, some people opt for side by side units. That's just personal preference... but sky's the limit, and you're not wasting usable interior space. You can opt to buy the various snap in modules for patch panels, coax, shelf/brackets, etc.... but you're not limited to those. I've seen many people use everything from L brackets, to double sided tape, to zip ties to secure their modems, switches, etc.

If cooling is a concern, they make louvered covers. Or, you easily mod the regular cover to have a couple computer case fans (intake at bottom, exhaust at top) on the inside of the door, like this [caworldwifi.com]. Then just slap a dust cover on the front side of the panel to make it look nice, and keep dust out. You will need to run power to the bottom of the panel though...but that should be easy to do since you haven't drywalled yet.

Here's some pics to give an idea of how much stuff you can stuff in these "little" boxes...
https://www.google.com/search?biw...CltyD8M5Ds
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Last edited by AngryPirate May 15, 2018 at 04:28 PM.
Nearly every problem and atrocity in the world boils down to someone's pursuit of imaginary things (religion, borders, money). Do away with these and humanity might have a chance.
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Aug 2005
L10: Grand Master
14,113 Posts
5,223 Reputation
#5
Quote from AngryPirate
:
I agree with DC about using Leviton or similar, non-proprietary parts. I also agree with mmathis about the Cat6 patch panel. Functionally, there's no real difference between the 2... except that the spacing on the Cat6 is a little larger to accommodate the larger diameter Cat6 wire. So you can get wires that "look" like their punched down good, but not actually making a good connection. Plus, it's only a few bucks more for the Cat6... not worth the headache of troubleshooting intermittent issues later on down the road, after enough expansion/retraction happens.

And just curious, was there a reason you opted to go with a wall mount rack instead of an On-Q style recessed box to house everything?... like this
https://www.amazon.com/Leviton-47...RGK0VTSC6N

Even though everything is in a closet, that rack is still going to take up a lot of space. The recessed OnQ style setup only occupies the unused space in between wall studs, and come in sizes up to 42", which should be plenty to house all your wiring and components. Or, some people opt for side by side units. That's just personal preference... but sky's the limit, and you're not wasting usable interior space. You can opt to buy the various snap in modules for patch panels, coax, shelf/brackets, etc.... but you're not limited to those. I've seen many people use everything from L brackets, to double sided tape, to zip ties to secure their modems, switches, etc.

If cooling is a concern, they make louvered covers. Or, you easily mod the regular cover to have a couple computer case fans (intake at bottom, exhaust at top) on the inside of the door, like this [caworldwifi.com]. Then just slap a dust cover on the front side of the panel to make it look nice, and keep dust out. You will need to run power to the bottom of the panel though...but that should be easy to do since you haven't drywalled yet.

Here's some pics to give an idea of how much stuff you can stuff in these "little" boxes...
https://www.google.com/search?biw...CltyD8M5Ds
If space isn't a concern, I would go with a rack it's just more flexible then the little closets. More space to put other stuff. I have a NAS in mine, UPS mounted under.

Here are some pictures of what I did when I retrofitted. https://imgur.com/a/kS9xm

Since then I have added a rack mount 48 port switch I bought on a deal,
Have a new router
Have fiber service coming in to the conduit.

Things to do
-Add an AC powered case fan probably

Things I recommend
-If you can centrally locate it thats great, especially if it's a conditioned space. Attics and garage are to be avoided if possible.
-Where you can run conduit it's cheap and make life easier. I ran conduit from outside the home to the rack. This made fiber install a breeze and the installers were super happy.
-Color code jacks where you can. I put up places to add security cameras later and AP's if I wanted. These got different color and numbering so they stand out.
-It's worth the time and money to plan this right at first.
-Monoprice wire, keystones and key plates work great.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Vague questions receive vague answers . . . . . .
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jun 2005
Let Sleeping Dogs Lie
6,362 Posts
2,503 Reputation
#6
I would also put some tubing with pull strings in too with foam you will not be able to fish anything

https://www.cabletiesandmore.com/...reLoom.php

You might want/need fiber at some point.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jul 2004
top secret
2,934 Posts
494 Reputation
#7
You are very fortunate to have been able to do so much during construction.

As an example of the other side of the coin - my daughter and her husband are about to close on their new home and it has been a much different experience.
Even 'though the electrical contractor offers home audio, security systems, and network cabling to his own customers the builder would not permit any of that as an option on the price of the home or as a private arrangement with the contractor who was there anyway doing all the normal wiring. Why they were willing to leave money on the table is beyond me but there was no changing their mind.
In the end, and we had to fight hard for this, the only concession we could get from the builder was to allow the installation of 2 PVC conduits. Between us and the electrician we have very careful measurements of where these conduits pass through each room and will have to open walls and cut into the conduits after they move in. The fire code required that the conduits be capped at each end and not be pierced anywhere along the length.
So... we have our work cut out for us after the closing! In addition to all the usual stuff - painting the garage floor, putting up a mailbox, trashing all the brand new switches to install smart ones... we get to run a bunch of Cat6. Yay!
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
There is no reason for any individual to have a computer in their home. Ken Olson, President & Founder, Digital Equipment Corp., 1977
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Aug 2005
L9: Master
4,757 Posts
2,066 Reputation
Pro
#8
Unless you have no alternative other than mounting in a rack (e.g., data center cage), then I prefer to terminate wiring to a patch panel mounted on the wall and then run patch cables to the rack from there vs having the panel in the rack. Easier install. Gives you easier access and more flexibility for moves/adds/changes. Saves a few U in the rack. It's a pain having to pull out a rack mounted patch panel to punch down a new cable or fix some problem. That would apply to your cams as well. That way you have all of your "premise wiring" independent of your hardware and can patch over however you want from there. When you move, you can just pull your gear and leave a panel vs a mess of unterminated cables.
Reply Helpful Comment? 1 0

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jul 2003
L10: Grand Master
34,224 Posts
6,108 Reputation
#9
Quote from Mike A.
:
Unless you have no alternative other than mounting in a rack (e.g., data center cage), then I prefer to terminate wiring to a patch panel mounted on the wall and then run patch cables to the rack from there vs having the panel in the rack. Easier install. Gives you easier access and more flexibility for moves/adds/changes. Saves a few U in the rack. It's a pain having to pull out a rack mounted patch panel to punch down a new cable or fix some problem. That would apply to your cams as well. That way you have all of your "premise wiring" independent of your hardware and can patch over however you want from there. When you move, you can just pull your gear and leave a panel vs a mess of unterminated cables.
* There are patch panel frames that accept jacks instead of having the "jack" built in to the frame.
So if one does prefer a rack mounted panel, but knows they will be adding on in the future, this can be a good solution.
This will allow for Coax or other non 4-pair UTP cables to also be terminated 'onto' the rack.

It all comes back to what your needs are.

I just had to relocate a router and AP to the 1st floor for a customer this week. They had plenty of cabling, too bad that the Cable TV ran over the Cat 6 cable and not all the coax that was run to all the rooms. I got lucky in that the Voice cable was able to connect the AP up. Not Ideal, but it does work and it's just 1 person living in the house, so not a lot of bandwidth required out of the AP.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Oct 2007
Get over it
5,277 Posts
2,241 Reputation
#10
Quote from LiquidRetro
:
If space isn't a concern, I would go with a rack it's just more flexible then the little closets. More space to put other stuff. I have a NAS in mine, UPS mounted under.

Here are some pictures of what I did when I retrofitted. https://imgur.com/a/kS9xm

Since then I have added a rack mount 48 port switch I bought on a deal,
Have a new router
Have fiber service coming in to the conduit.

Things to do
-Add an AC powered case fan probably

Things I recommend
-If you can centrally locate it thats great, especially if it's a conditioned space. Attics and garage are to be avoided if possible.
-Where you can run conduit it's cheap and make life easier. I ran conduit from outside the home to the rack. This made fiber install a breeze and the installers were super happy.
-Color code jacks where you can. I put up places to add security cameras later and AP's if I wanted. These got different color and numbering so they stand out.
-It's worth the time and money to plan this right at first.
-Monoprice wire, keystones and key plates work great.
First... GREAT looking install!! I see so many people just throw the low voltage wires over trusses and leave them loose, only to be stepped on and ruined later on down the road. When it only takes an extra hour or so to keep them up high and out of harm's way.

As for the rack vs cage thing... it's obviously personal preference. I just prefer the clean look of the hidden OnQ type setups, and being able to keep closet/wall space freed up for other things like shelving, storage, etc. Because we all know that storage space becomes valuable after a few years of accumulating items (especially being here on SD Smilie ) And in my experience, it's very rare that one has to go inside the panel/cage anyway, once everything is initially setup. Maybe the occasional modem/router rebooting or similar. Other than that though, I like the outta sight, outta mind, rather than having to look at a big ugly cage in my closet... just my preference.
Reply Helpful Comment? 1 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Aug 2005
L9: Master
4,757 Posts
2,066 Reputation
Pro
#11
Quote from DC
:
* There are patch panel frames that accept jacks instead of having the "jack" built in to the frame.
So if one does prefer a rack mounted panel, but knows they will be adding on in the future, this can be a good solution.
This will allow for Coax or other non 4-pair UTP cables to also be terminated 'onto' the rack.

It all comes back to what your needs are.

Yeah, that can make it a little easier with a smaller panel either way. There also are panels with swappable modules for blocks of ports for different types of media.

Once you get to a bunch of ports it's not the termination itself that's the trouble, it's mostly managing all of the wiring behind it. 24 - 48 cables is a wad of wire going into a rack along with everything else and it's a mess trying to snake things through or move anything. Coax in there even worse. If it's a big stand up rack with good cable management that you can just walk around to the back of and do what you need to do with plenty of room to work then not as bad. But that's usually not the case in a home install. Generally better to keep all of that separate if you can and just patch over. But like you say depends on what you want/need.
Reply Helpful Comment? 1 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Mar 2015
New User
4 Posts
10 Reputation
Original Poster
#12
Thank you all for the comments and discussion.

I debated whether to do a flush-mount enclosure vs. rack. I have the room for a rack and would prefer a rack after all the research that I have done.

I did not install conduit. Yes, I know I'm screwed when fiber optic comes. I will have to take my chances with CAT6.

I ordered the rack that I linked in my original post. Regarding the patch panel, Thanks for the tip to get standard 110 IDIC clips, rather than Krone. I ordered this patch panel:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product...UTF8&psc=1

Are there any recommendations for a punch tool or tools? Thanks.

I may mount the patch panel on the side of the rack, like suggested above. I'll have to see how everything lays out when I have it in front of me.

I also got this rack mounted power strip. Probably overkill, but won't have to worry about outlets.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product...UTF8&psc=1

Any recommendations for a nice crimping tool, clips, wall plates and jacks? I believe my contractor may have some of these, but I may end up doing some of the terminations.

I'm attaching a couple of photos of the wiring as it sits now. Please go easy on me. The coax runs were done by the contractor before we talked about doing the rack. The CAT6 is supported in the attic occasionally. We'll see how this turns out. I will try to post updates when the rack arrives. Thanks all.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Feb 2004
L10: Grand Master
6,962 Posts
972 Reputation
#13
Quote from deal_meister
:
Thank you all for the comments and discussion.

I debated whether to do a flush-mount enclosure vs. rack. I have the room for a rack and would prefer a rack after all the research that I have done.

I did not install conduit. Yes, I know I'm screwed when fiber optic comes. I will have to take my chances with CAT6.

I ordered the rack that I linked in my original post. Regarding the patch panel, Thanks for the tip to get standard 110 IDIC clips, rather than Krone. I ordered this patch panel:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product...UTF8&psc=1

Are there any recommendations for a punch tool or tools? Thanks.

I may mount the patch panel on the side of the rack, like suggested above. I'll have to see how everything lays out when I have it in front of me.

I also got this rack mounted power strip. Probably overkill, but won't have to worry about outlets.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product...UTF8&psc=1

Any recommendations for a nice crimping tool, clips, wall plates and jacks? I believe my contractor may have some of these, but I may end up doing some of the terminations.

I'm attaching a couple of photos of the wiring as it sits now. Please go easy on me. The coax runs were done by the contractor before we talked about doing the rack. The CAT6 is supported in the attic occasionally. We'll see how this turns out. I will try to post updates when the rack arrives. Thanks all.
I used the cheap punch-down tool that came with my monoprice patch panel, so any tool will suffice for the home user. If you were doing this professionally, you'd want something better, but it's likely not worth spending a whole lot.

You shouldn't need any crimp tools. Punch down your in-wall wires on both ends (patch panel on one, wall jack on the other) and just buy the short patch cables. Crimping is much more difficult than punching down (for beginners at least), so just save yourself the headache and buy your cables. Monoprice is frequently recommended here for patch cables, as well as keystone jacks and wall plates. Your local orange or blue big-box store will have some (more expensive) jacks and wall plates as well; you might also try a local electrical supply shop.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Aug 2005
L10: Grand Master
14,113 Posts
5,223 Reputation
#14
Quote from deal_meister
:
Thank you all for the comments and discussion.

I debated whether to do a flush-mount enclosure vs. rack. I have the room for a rack and would prefer a rack after all the research that I have done.

I did not install conduit. Yes, I know I'm screwed when fiber optic comes. I will have to take my chances with CAT6.

I ordered the rack that I linked in my original post. Regarding the patch panel, Thanks for the tip to get standard 110 IDIC clips, rather than Krone. I ordered this patch panel:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product...UTF8&psc=1

Are there any recommendations for a punch tool or tools? Thanks.

I may mount the patch panel on the side of the rack, like suggested above. I'll have to see how everything lays out when I have it in front of me.

I also got this rack mounted power strip. Probably overkill, but won't have to worry about outlets.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product...UTF8&psc=1

Any recommendations for a nice crimping tool, clips, wall plates and jacks? I believe my contractor may have some of these, but I may end up doing some of the terminations.

I'm attaching a couple of photos of the wiring as it sits now. Please go easy on me. The coax runs were done by the contractor before we talked about doing the rack. The CAT6 is supported in the attic occasionally. We'll see how this turns out. I will try to post updates when the rack arrives. Thanks all.
I bought a Fluke punchdown tool when I did mine because I could use it for work too sometimes. It's nice but nothing crazy. Kline makes a decent one too. It looks like monoprice has one with good reviews too. I would do your own termination. Contractors tend to overcharge or not do the best job if it's not something they do every day. Buy a few extra jacks, watch a few videos on youtube and you can do it.

PDU is overkill. Usually they plug into two different power sources. I would look for one with surge protection. Personally I use a UPS instead as I would prefer to keep my network running for a little while for brief power outages etc. I wall mounted mine to keep it out of the way.

You won't need a crimping tool, use keystones on both ends into wall plates and buy patch cables. I have had good luck with monoprice keystones myself and I bought wall plates from them too so fit was good.

Your wiring looks good but why is it not inside the wall? Is that going to be an unfinished closet or something? If so suspend it from the ceiling and make it nice so it's not in the middle of the room and to take stress off the cables/connectors.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jul 2003
L10: Grand Master
34,224 Posts
6,108 Reputation
#15
+1 You don't need a Crimping tool.
Use Jacks at both ends and buy patch cords.



I would consider the following tools:

*Getting your tools from Monoprice (or similar retailer) is like getting your yard/wood working tools from Harbor Freight and/or the dollar store. Yeah they will work, but their lifespan is limited and may not do as good as job as getting the real deal. With that said, it's not like an average homeowner is going to get a 5,000 dollar cable tester to check their own work, etc... Back in the day the OTDR (Fiber Tester) was like ~$30,000 or so that we used to test fiber. Tech does get better and cheaper, but the ROI can be limited.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Last edited by DC May 22, 2018 at 07:31 AM.
Page 1 of 2
1 2
Join the Conversation
Add a Comment
 
Copyright 1999 - 2018. Slickdeals, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Copyright / Infringement Policy  •  Privacy Policy  •  Terms of Service  •  Acceptable Use Policy (Rules)  •  Interest-Based Ads
Link Copied to Clipboard