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Dr. Panda's Swimming Pool (Android or iOS) EXPIRED

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Splash and play with five cute baby animals in Dr. Panda’s Swimming Pool! There are three big pools to dive into and five animals to take care of. Play dress up in the locker room, have a snack by the poolside, take a trip down a water slide or dive off the side off a pirate ship in search of hidden treasure!

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Edited May 23, 2018 at 03:44 PM by
Both the App store and Google Play have Dr. Panda's Swimming Pool for free.

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Thanks, OP. (This isn't directed at you personally, but) free, quality, (seemingly) kid-friendly apps are great, but this app's permissions shouldn't require that you allow access to the photos and videos, especially when this is an app likely to be installed on a child's device.

This app also gets the device's phone number and the phone numbers to which the device connects. Again, collecting the user's call logs is completely unnecessary for the functionality of the app and especially concerning for an app that is far more likely to be installed on a child's device than most.

Permissions like these are going to be there next "data breach" (that isn't really a data breach because people handed over the files/info when they gave the devs permission to access this info unnecessarily) that people flip out over. It's well known that pedos comb Facebook for pics/vids of kids (which many parents freely, publicly post), but can you imagine what they get by accessing the pics people *don't* upload? Even when devs don't do this for pedo reasons, it's still a privacy violation, especially for children.

If an app does not require a specific permission as part of it's functionality, then ask yourself (and the devs) "why are they asking for it?". Some devs will say "oh, we ask for it, but we don't use it.". Riiight, then there's no reason to ask for it if that's true - remove it.

Anyway, if you don't pay attention to such things, it's worth it to dig into the app settings (they're listed on 2 different pages in settings in Android 6) and see exactly what you've allowed each app permission to access. It can be scary to see. I recommend disabling as many permissions as possible for games and "fun" apps, only re-enabling permissions as required. The same applies to other apps, with more caution. Disabling everything you have the option to disable up-front - and only enabling what's absolutely necessary - further protects your privacy. /soapbox
43 Helpful?
I'm a little iffy on that Pandas doctoral certifications.
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#3
Thanks OP. My kids love Dr. Panda!
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Our community has rated this post as helpful. If you agree, why not rep ellemdee?
#4
Thanks, OP. (This isn't directed at you personally, but) free, quality, (seemingly) kid-friendly apps are great, but this app's permissions shouldn't require that you allow access to the photos and videos, especially when this is an app likely to be installed on a child's device.

This app also gets the device's phone number and the phone numbers to which the device connects. Again, collecting the user's call logs is completely unnecessary for the functionality of the app and especially concerning for an app that is far more likely to be installed on a child's device than most.

Permissions like these are going to be there next "data breach" (that isn't really a data breach because people handed over the files/info when they gave the devs permission to access this info unnecessarily) that people flip out over. It's well known that pedos comb Facebook for pics/vids of kids (which many parents freely, publicly post), but can you imagine what they get by accessing the pics people *don't* upload? Even when devs don't do this for pedo reasons, it's still a privacy violation, especially for children.

If an app does not require a specific permission as part of it's functionality, then ask yourself (and the devs) "why are they asking for it?". Some devs will say "oh, we ask for it, but we don't use it.". Riiight, then there's no reason to ask for it if that's true - remove it.

Anyway, if you don't pay attention to such things, it's worth it to dig into the app settings (they're listed on 2 different pages in settings in Android 6) and see exactly what you've allowed each app permission to access. It can be scary to see. I recommend disabling as many permissions as possible for games and "fun" apps, only re-enabling permissions as required. The same applies to other apps, with more caution. Disabling everything you have the option to disable up-front - and only enabling what's absolutely necessary - further protects your privacy. /soapbox
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Our community has rated this post as helpful. If you agree, why not rep rjdyerz?
#5
I'm a little iffy on that Pandas doctoral certifications.
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#6
Wow look, front page material here, amazing
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#7
This "game?" Is really crappy.
Its more of a grab baby animal and move them around thing. there's no actual game
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Last edited by crusian May 19, 2018 at 08:24 AM.
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#8
Quote from ellemdee
:
Thanks, OP. (This isn't directed at you personally, but) free, quality, (seemingly) kid-friendly apps are great, but this app's permissions shouldn't require that you allow access to the photos and videos, especially when this is an app likely to be installed on a child's device.

This app also gets the device's phone number and the phone numbers to which the device connects. Again, collecting the user's call logs is completely unnecessary for the functionality of the app and especially concerning for an app that is far more likely to be installed on a child's device than most.

Permissions like these are going to be there next "data breach" (that isn't really a data breach because people handed over the files/info when they gave the devs permission to access this info unnecessarily) that people flip out over. It's well known that pedos comb Facebook for pics/vids of kids (which many parents freely, publicly post), but can you imagine what they get by accessing the pics people *don't* upload? Even when devs don't do this for pedo reasons, it's still a privacy violation, especially for children.

If an app does not require a specific permission as part of it's functionality, then ask yourself (and the devs) "why are they asking for it?". Some devs will say "oh, we ask for it, but we don't use it.". Riiight, then there's no reason to ask for it if that's true - remove it.

Anyway, if you don't pay attention to such things, it's worth it to dig into the app settings (they're listed on 2 different pages in settings in Android 6) and see exactly what you've allowed each app permission to access. It can be scary to see. I recommend disabling as many permissions as possible for games and "fun" apps, only re-enabling permissions as required. The same applies to other apps, with more caution. Disabling everything you have the option to disable up-front - and only enabling what's absolutely necessary - further protects your privacy. /soapbox
Lol stop freaking me out. I guess my data is constantly being used for nefarious means. I guess I will start taking gross pics to show them who is boss.
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#9
Quote from ellemdee
:
Thanks, OP. (This isn't directed at you personally, but) free, quality, (seemingly) kid-friendly apps are great, but this app's permissions shouldn't require that you allow access to the photos and videos, especially when this is an app likely to be installed on a child's device.

This app also gets the device's phone number and the phone numbers to which the device connects. Again, collecting the user's call logs is completely unnecessary for the functionality of the app and especially concerning for an app that is far more likely to be installed on a child's device than most.

Permissions like these are going to be there next "data breach" (that isn't really a data breach because people handed over the files/info when they gave the devs permission to access this info unnecessarily) that people flip out over. It's well known that pedos comb Facebook for pics/vids of kids (which many parents freely, publicly post), but can you imagine what they get by accessing the pics people *don't* upload? Even when devs don't do this for pedo reasons, it's still a privacy violation, especially for children.

If an app does not require a specific permission as part of it's functionality, then ask yourself (and the devs) "why are they asking for it?". Some devs will say "oh, we ask for it, but we don't use it.". Riiight, then there's no reason to ask for it if that's true - remove it.

Anyway, if you don't pay attention to such things, it's worth it to dig into the app settings (they're listed on 2 different pages in settings in Android 6) and see exactly what you've allowed each app permission to access. It can be scary to see. I recommend disabling as many permissions as possible for games and "fun" apps, only re-enabling permissions as required. The same applies to other apps, with more caution. Disabling everything you have the option to disable up-front - and only enabling what's absolutely necessary - further protects your privacy. /soapbox
but most if not all apps ask for this permission. the only other way around it is to not to use and download apps.
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#10
Quote from bobbylight
:
Lol stop freaking me out. I guess my data is constantly being used for nefarious means. I guess I will start taking gross pics to show them who is boss.
It's good to be able to make informed decisions. Smilie

Have fun documenting your multi-Couric achievements. laugh out loud
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#11
Quote from mr_burnzz
:
but most if not all apps ask for this permission. the only other way around it is to not to use and download apps.
All, or even most, apps don't ask for this. Some do, but the only apps which should be asking for specific call information are apps whose functionality involves actual phone calls. If an app asks to access your photos and videos, its functionality should require those things (photo editing or collage apps, for example). Most people wouldn't give a strange mail carrier a spontaneous tour of their house (something they don't need to do their job), even if 'most people or everyone else' was doing it, but gladly hand over unfettered access to photos & videos of their children and themselves in exchange for a fart app.

I have lots of apps installed and don't allow access that isn't required for that app's functionality in order to minimize risk. Keeping in mind that devs could store your info and copies of your pics/video anywhere in the world if they so desire and using common sense when choosing what to install and allow is a good practice, especially considering that there are still lots of baddies floating around in the app store.
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#12
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Last edited by drilambo May 19, 2018 at 10:52 AM.
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#13
Quote from ellemdee
:
Thanks, OP. (This isn't directed at you personally, but) free, quality, (seemingly) kid-friendly apps are great, but this app's permissions shouldn't require that you allow access to the photos and videos, especially when this is an app likely to be installed on a child's device.

This app also gets the device's phone number and the phone numbers to which the device connects. Again, collecting the user's call logs is completely unnecessary for the functionality of the app and especially concerning for an app that is far more likely to be installed on a child's device than most.

Permissions like these are going to be there next "data breach" (that isn't really a data breach because people handed over the files/info when they gave the devs permission to access this info unnecessarily) that people flip out over. It's well known that pedos comb Facebook for pics/vids of kids (which many parents freely, publicly post), but can you imagine what they get by accessing the pics people *don't* upload? Even when devs don't do this for pedo reasons, it's still a privacy violation, especially for children.

If an app does not require a specific permission as part of it's functionality, then ask yourself (and the devs) "why are they asking for it?". Some devs will say "oh, we ask for it, but we don't use it.". Riiight, then there's no reason to ask for it if that's true - remove it.

Anyway, if you don't pay attention to such things, it's worth it to dig into the app settings (they're listed on 2 different pages in settings in Android 6) and see exactly what you've allowed each app permission to access. It can be scary to see. I recommend disabling as many permissions as possible for games and "fun" apps, only re-enabling permissions as required. The same applies to other apps, with more caution. Disabling everything you have the option to disable up-front - and only enabling what's absolutely necessary - further protects your privacy. /soapbox
I jist hit Deny for those permissions, app works fine :-)
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#14
I'm 49 years old and I just spent the last ten minutes bathing farm animals, drying them off and returning them to their parents. Thanks Op!
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#15
Quote from ellemdee
:
Thanks, OP. (This isn't directed at you personally, but) free, quality, (seemingly) kid-friendly apps are great, but this app's permissions shouldn't require that you allow access to the photos and videos, especially when this is an app likely to be installed on a child's device.

This app also gets the device's phone number and the phone numbers to which the device connects. Again, collecting the user's call logs is completely unnecessary for the functionality of the app and especially concerning for an app that is far more likely to be installed on a child's device than most.

Permissions like these are going to be there next "data breach" (that isn't really a data breach because people handed over the files/info when they gave the devs permission to access this info unnecessarily) that people flip out over. It's well known that pedos comb Facebook for pics/vids of kids (which many parents freely, publicly post), but can you imagine what they get by accessing the pics people *don't* upload? Even when devs don't do this for pedo reasons, it's still a privacy violation, especially for children.

If an app does not require a specific permission as part of it's functionality, then ask yourself (and the devs) "why are they asking for it?". Some devs will say "oh, we ask for it, but we don't use it.". Riiight, then there's no reason to ask for it if that's true - remove it.

Anyway, if you don't pay attention to such things, it's worth it to dig into the app settings (they're listed on 2 different pages in settings in Android 6) and see exactly what you've allowed each app permission to access. It can be scary to see. I recommend disabling as many permissions as possible for games and "fun" apps, only re-enabling permissions as required. The same applies to other apps, with more caution. Disabling everything you have the option to disable up-front - and only enabling what's absolutely necessary - further protects your privacy. /soapbox
I always install these kind of apps into a spare phone with no personal info at all.
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