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Celestron Telescope Sale + Extra 10% off: PowerSeeker 114AZ Telescope

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Created 07-06-2018 at 02:03 PM by iconian
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57 Comments

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I recommend starting with either a Newtonian Reflector or astro-binoculars, because you can view a lot of stuff with either one. The first one on the list (the Powerseeker) is a low-cost Newtonian that will get the job done, but read on before deciding...

Most people give up on astronomy fairly early, it ends up being about a week-long hobby. The reason is that they buy cheap telescopes that are nothing but frustrating, so they are underwhelmed by the experience.

I realize the Powerseeker is hard to resist for it's low price, but a much better choice is a Dobsonian (which is a type of Newtonian Reflector) such as Skywatcher 8" for $319.50. That's a great sale price, the Orion version of it is $380 for comparison.

Here's the Skywatcher 8":
https://www.focuscamera.com/celes...scope.html

There's also a 6" version of the Skywatcher, but the 8" gathers a lot more light and is worth the extra coin. I go to astronomy club get-togethers once in a while, and the Dobsonian's are the scopes that everyone gravitates to, amateur and pro alike. They can pull in incredible detail and very faint objects.
54 Helpful?
Nope.

They do make dobs that track but they cost more.

Dobs are best bang/buck as far as size... they're not always ideal to move around though....viewing position isn't always ideal either depending on height but you can work around that with your seating/step/whatever.

Telescopes are a tradeoff of a number of things- price, portability, ease of use, quality, and how much and in what detail they can see

If you don't plan to move it around much and are happy to learn to manually find stuff in the sky get the biggest dob you can afford (and some good lenses and such for it)

If you want best size while remaining very portable some kind of SCT is the way to go...they'll cost more though... (and you can get em anywhere from totally manual, all the way up to push a button and it'll calibrate itself and then find whatever object in the sky you tell it to on its own- again price dependent)....personally I like the Celestron Evolution series as a good bang/buck on size/portability/lazy-astronomer-tech but it's not super cheap


You should also have realistic expectations...large scopes will collect more light to let you see more....but if you live someplace with a lot of light pollution (which is where most people in the US live anymore) you're not going to be seeing tons of spectacular nebula and such... you're gonna basically be able to see the moon, a few planets (Jupiter and Saturn, and Mars especially when close, look good from anywhere... Venus is pretty featureless but also easy to see anywhere)... and... some stars/star clusters... and that's about it. Even the brightest deep sky objects like nebula/galaxies will be either invisible or a gray smudge in heavy light pollution.


Even if you live someplace dark, or within reasonable travel range of someplace dark, you can see a lot more.... but you're still not going to get hubble-quality views with your eye of most DSOs.... the spectacular detail and color in most astro shots comes from long exposures and/or stacking a lot of shots on top of each other.

this is a pretty good site for giving you some realistic expectations based on scope size and also a bit on light/dark skies

http://www.deepskywatch.com/Artic...scope.html
10 Helpful?
need adapters. Pretty steep learning curve for astrophotography. Dont expect to attach a camera and snap a recognizable photo of a planet on your first or even 20th try.
7 Helpful?

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#3
Thumbs up for telescope deals even if they aren't what I need. I have a celestron evolution 8 and love it.
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#4
Can I Mount a camera to take photos?
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#5
Quote from NormanE
:
Can I Mount a camera to take photos?

yep, but there could be some specific settings u gotta look at, maybe high iso or longer exposure, i dont know for sure
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#6
Quote from NormanE
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Can I Mount a camera to take photos?
need adapters. Pretty steep learning curve for astrophotography. Dont expect to attach a camera and snap a recognizable photo of a planet on your first or even 20th try.
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Quote from NormanE
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Can I Mount a camera to take photos?
Any decent dslr will do. You need an adapter for a few dollars. Some patients and some research. You can actually video tape something like Jupiter or the moon and then use a program like registax to create a pretty decent image. After that its lots and lots of trial and error for things like nebula and other galaxies.
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#8
Any model recommendation for beginners?
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#9
by the way, these mars opposition sales are somewhat misleading as mars is under a planet wide dust storm. While you will be able to see the planet, you will probably see no features of the planet.
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#10
Quote from LordAss
:
Any model recommendation for beginners?
Second this. Which one is a good option for a first telescope?
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#11
Quote from LordAss
:
Any model recommendation for beginners?
Quote from RamesesThe2nd
:
Second this. Which one is a good option for a first telescope?
I recommend starting with either a Newtonian Reflector or astro-binoculars, because you can view a lot of stuff with either one. The first one on the list (the Powerseeker) is a low-cost Newtonian that will get the job done, but read on before deciding...

Most people give up on astronomy fairly early, it ends up being about a week-long hobby. The reason is that they buy cheap telescopes that are nothing but frustrating, so they are underwhelmed by the experience.

I realize the Powerseeker is hard to resist for it's low price, but a much better choice is a Dobsonian (which is a type of Newtonian Reflector) such as Skywatcher 8" for $319.50. That's a great sale price, the Orion version of it is $380 for comparison.

Here's the Skywatcher 8":
https://www.focuscamera.com/celes...scope.html

There's also a 6" version of the Skywatcher, but the 8" gathers a lot more light and is worth the extra coin. I go to astronomy club get-togethers once in a while, and the Dobsonian's are the scopes that everyone gravitates to, amateur and pro alike. They can pull in incredible detail and very faint objects.
Reply Helpful Comment? 54 0
Last edited by LonelyHiker July 6, 2018 at 07:10 PM.
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#12
Quote from LonelyHiker
:
I recommend starting with either a Newtonian Reflector or astro-binoculars, because you can view a lot of stuff with either one. The first one on the list (the Powerseeker) is a low-cost Newtonian that will get the job done, but read on before deciding...

Most people give up on astronomy fairly early, it ends up being about a week-long hobby. The reason is that they buy cheap telescopes that are nothing but frustrating, so they are underwhelmed by the experience.

I realize the Powerseeker is hard to resist for it's low price, but a much better choice is a Dobsonian (which is a type of Newtonian Reflector) such as Skywatcher 8" for $319.50. That's a great sale price, the Orion version of it is $380 for comparison.

Here's the Skywatcher 8":
https://www.focuscamera.com/celes...scope.html

There's also a 6" version of the Skywatcher, but the 8" gathers a lot more light and is worth the extra coin. I go to astronomy club get-togethers once in a while, and the Dobsonian's are the scopes that everyone gravitates to, amateur and pro alike. They can pull in incredible detail and very faint objects.
Plz share link is those two recommend scope
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#13
Quote from LonelyHiker
:
I recommend starting with either a Newtonian Reflector or astro-binoculars, because you can view a lot of stuff with either one. The first one on the list (the Powerseeker) is a low-cost Newtonian that will get the job done, but read on before deciding...

Most people give up on astronomy fairly early, it ends up being about a week-long hobby. The reason is that they buy cheap telescopes that are nothing but frustrating, so they are underwhelmed by the experience.

I realize the Powerseeker is hard to resist for it's low price, but a much better choice is a Dobsonian (which is a type of Newtonian Reflector) such as Skywatcher 8" for $319.50. That's a great sale price, the Orion version of it is $380 for comparison.

Here's the Skywatcher 8":
https://www.focuscamera.com/celes...scope.html

There's also a 6" version of the Skywatcher, but the 8" gathers a lot more light and is worth the extra coin. I go to astronomy club get-togethers once in a while, and the Dobsonian's are the scopes that everyone gravitates to, amateur and pro alike. They can pull in incredible detail and very faint objects.
Does this track objects?
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#14
Quote from LordAss
:
Any model recommendation for beginners?
Quote from RamesesThe2nd
:
Second this. Which one is a good option for a first telescope?
Quote from LonelyHiker
:
I recommend starting with either a Newtonian Reflector or astro-binoculars, because you can view a lot of stuff with either one. The first one on the list (the Powerseeker) is a low-cost Newtonian that will get the job done, but read on before deciding...

Most people give up on astronomy fairly early, it ends up being about a week-long hobby. The reason is that they buy cheap telescopes that are nothing but frustrating, so they are underwhelmed by the experience.

I realize the Powerseeker is hard to resist for it's low price, but a much better choice is a Dobsonian (which is a type of Newtonian Reflector) such as Skywatcher 8" for $319.50. That's a great sale price, the Orion version of it is $380 for comparison.

Here's the Skywatcher 8":
https://www.focuscamera.com/celes...scope.html [focuscamera.com]

There's also a 6" version of the Skywatcher, but the 8" gathers a lot more light and is worth the extra coin. I go to astronomy club get-togethers once in a while, and the Dobsonian's are the scopes that everyone gravitates to, amateur and pro alike. They can pull in incredible detail and very faint objects.
Some libraries now have Telescope's you can check out.

Are you not a fan of the Celestron 21024 FirstScope Telescope https://www.amazon.com/Celestron-21024-FirstScope-Telescope/dp/B001UQ6E4Y [amazon.com]

Sure its very simple and small but its a a good price to see if you want to upgrade to something better later on or not.
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#15
I had the 114AZ Powerseeker at one time. Unusable telescope - it's very heavy on the side with the mirror because it's not hinged in the center. And that silver rod is super slippery - so with the weight issue I mentioned compounded with the slippery rod, it ALWAYS slides down on the mirror side (changing the angle) on its own no matter how much you tighten the rod. The updated version is the 114AZ EXPLORASCOPE - it's almost 1 ft. shorter, hinge is in the middle, and the rod is coated with matte paint to prevent the slip issue. The newer Explorascope has a lower aperture however, I believe F/9 instead of F/8 on the Powerseeker (so newer model lets in about 10% less light).
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