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The Science of Interstellar (Kindle eBook) $2.99

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Yet in The Science of Interstellar, Kip Thorne, the Nobel prize-winning physicist who assisted Nolan on the scientific aspects of Interstellar, shows us that the movie's jaw-dropping events and stunning, never-before-attempted visuals are grounded in real science. Thorne shares his experiences working as the science adviser on the film and then moves on to the science itself. In chapters on wormholes, black holes, interstellar travel, and much more, Thorne's scientific insights—many of them triggered during the actual scripting and shooting of Interstellar—describe the physical laws that govern our universe and the truly astounding phenomena that those laws make possible.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NUB4EVC/
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Created 07-11-2018 at 04:18 PM by gintonic
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Joined Apr 2006
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great movie Smilie ...and great author, of course Smilie
this country could use more science...starting from the top, of course
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As somebody who cut his SF teeth on Larry Niven's Tales of Known Space stories (both the collection and the universe including classic like Ringworld) I found the Interstellar black hole shenanigans a bit irritating, as though they were invoking the terms magic and prophecy in a fantasy movie. I would guess it's more the director's and script writer's fault, but it really bites to watch a supposedly "good" SF move that gets so much wrong.

The radiation from matter falling into the black hole would have fried anything close by with high energy radiation, or if all the matter except rocky planets has fallen into it/been swept clean so you don't have high energy radiation, then it's dark and they are not habitable anyway. You are not going to get the more gentle radiation necessary for life like you do around a G-Class Sun like ours - black holes by their very physics are going to generate high energy radiation if they have anything at all in the accretion disc (the crap on it's way to falling into the black hole). The planets would have been tidal locked (killing one plot line), with pretty much all atmosphere and most gasses stripped away by the high radiation (killing the entire point of going there). This doesn't even touch the issues of the amount of fuel and transit times between planets in different orbits around the black hole. One term for it is a "steep gravity well", which pretty much sums up the problem unless everything is pretty much the same distance and on the same plane from the black hole.

This doesn't even touch the issue of the genetics of hybrid corn being the toughest and last surviving plant on earth. Even if you just limit yourself to edible crops, corn is not a particularly hardy plant (hint - look up Okra and Collard Greens just for starters). Then you get into the time travel and causality issues more like a weak copy of 2001, though that may actually be the best science of the three main themes mentioned here.

I enjoy a good SF movie. This is a Hollywood Blockbuster with the trappings of Science, but just because you slap the label on it doesn't make it so, that's branding... Nono
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Last edited by Mr. Harley July 11, 2018 at 09:52 PM. Reason: accidently posted while editing
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Quote from Mr. Harley
:
As somebody who cut his SF teeth on Larry Niven's Tales of Known Space stories (both the collection and the universe including classic like Ringworld) I found the Interstellar black hole shenanigans a bit irritating, as though they were invoking the terms magic and prophecy in a fantasy movie. I would guess it's more the director's and script writer's fault, but it really bites to watch a supposedly "good" SF move that gets so much wrong.

The radiation from matter falling into the black hole would have fried anything close by with high energy radiation, or if all the matter except rocky planets has fallen into it/been swept clean so you don't have high energy radiation, then it's dark and they are not habitable anyway. You are not going to get the more gentle radiation necessary for life like you do around a G-Class Sun like ours - black holes by their very physics are going to generate high energy radiation if they have anything at all in the accretion disc (the crap on it's way to falling into the black hole). The planets would have been tidal locked (killing one plot line), with pretty much all atmosphere and most gasses stripped away by the high radiation (killing the entire point of going there). This doesn't even touch the issues of the amount of fuel and transit times between planets in different orbits around the black hole. One term for it is a "steep gravity well", which pretty much sums up the problem unless everything is pretty much the same distance and on the same plane from the black hole.

This doesn't even touch the issue of the genetics of hybrid corn being the toughest and last surviving plant on earth. Even if you just limit yourself to edible crops, corn is not a particularly hardy plant (hint - look up Okra and Collard Greens just for starters). Then you get into the time travel and causality issues more like a weak copy of 2001, though that may actually be the best science of the three main themes mentioned here.

I enjoy a good SF movie. This is a Hollywood Blockbuster with the trappings of Science, but just because you slap the label on it doesn't make it so, that's branding... https://static.slickdealscdn.com/ima...lies2/nono.gif
it's a MOVIE. you are too strict on the "science" part in the MOVIE. people like to see super hero catches bullets with their bare hand, same goes here.
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Quote from BondT
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it's a MOVIE. you are too strict on the "science" part in the MOVIE. people like to see super hero catches bullets with their bare hand, same goes here.
That's a super-hero movie, and when I watch one I evaluate by the genre. A horror movie, the same way. Star Wars was space opera, and was a seminal move for that genre. In fact in the 4th movie - episode 1 - when Lucas tried to make it more "science fictiony" with midichlorians, fans revolted and IMHO I agreed.

Interstellar was billed as an SF Movie, and that invites looking at the science part of it. While I don't want to return to the 1950-70 era roughly, when scientists became authority figures and essentially told us not to worry our ignorant (or pretty) little heads about while large corporations capitalized on this to convince people that lead in paint, cigarettes, or industrial pollutants were safe or even yummy, I also do not want us to instead continue the trend of science is simply opinion, whether it's global warming or the efficacy of vaccines. Since I think both Anne Hathaway and Jessica Chastain are good actresses and yummy, I was willing to give the movie the benefit of the doubt. Big mistake. If you want to see even more flaws, go to "Everything Wrong with Interstellar, Featuring Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson". This includes all kinds of plot holes, and I've just wrote about two science issues that create plot holes big enough to hide a black hole in (plus just rewatching the video, I went online and checked - the maximum time dilation is roughly 10:1, not the 60,000:1 of the movie).
https://www.quora.com/Could-someo...terstellar
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSuFlNGj5rI
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