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Router, Ethernet, Streaming Upgrade - Cutting the Cord!

1,487 2,365 July 12, 2018 at 11:57 AM Get Best Buy Coupons
I am planning to upgrade everything next week...

My current router is outdated (D‑Link RangeBooster G WBR‑2310). Any suggestions???

I will be updating my Ethernet Cables from Cat-5 to Cat-7 (I was thinking this one: https://www.monoprice.com/product?p_id=13660).

I will also be updating my streaming from LGTV built-in apps to the NVIDIA SHIELD - (This one: NVIDIA - SHIELD TV 16 GB Streaming Media Player with Controller https://www.bestbuy.com/site/nvid...Id=5709686)

We have several devices running:
2 - Smart TVs (Ethernet Connection)
4 - Tablets
1 - ps3 consoles
4 - Smart Phones
2 - Laptops
1 - Hive Hub/Smart Thermostat (Ethernet Connection)
1 - Office Computer (Ethernet Connection)
1 - Nvidia Shield, by next week (Ethernet Connection)

Streaming:
Netflix, Hulu, PLEX, Amazon Prime, Internet Provided Channels, Gaming, etc.

What should I be looking for in a Router? I want to stay under $150.
NOTE: Range is not an issue!

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#2
Take the money you would had spent on the ethernet cables and instead put it into the router/network setup. You are not going to gain anything in terms of speed or reliability at home by going from cat5 to shielded Cat7. If you were running 10G over ethernet then it would be worth upgrading.

As far as router research I would start at https://www.smallnetbuilder.com/w...ss-reviews The good news is most of your devices are wired which is great and will offload a lot off the wireless side of things. You could get fancy and split stuff into VLAN's and QOS them all to give priority to certain devices or classes of devices.

How technical are you? What is your WAN bandwidth? If you have a gigabit fiber connection that will be a big factor in router selection as you need quite a bit of processing power to get gig WAN speeds especially if you end up doing QOS or other filtering and segmentation on LAN side.

Are you concerned with IOT Device isolation and security at all?
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Last edited by LiquidRetro July 12, 2018 at 02:23 PM.
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#3
You can get routers that form a mesh network for better coverage but adding a second or third wifi router connected via ethernet is also a good option to get rid of dead spots.
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#4
Quote from LiquidRetro
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Take the money you would had spent on the ethernet cables and instead put it into the router/network setup. You are not going to gain anything in terms of speed or reliability at home by going from cat5 to shielded Cat7. If you were running 10G over ethernet then it would be worth upgrading.

As far as router research I would start at https://www.smallnetbuilder.com/w...ss-reviews The good news is most of your devices are wired which is great and will offload a lot off the wireless side of things. You could get fancy and split stuff into VLAN's and QOS them all to give priority to certain devices or classes of devices.

How technical are you? What is your WAN bandwidth? If you have a gigabit fiber connection that will be a big factor in router selection as you need quite a bit of processing power to get gig WAN speeds especially if you end up doing QOS or other filtering and segmentation on LAN side.

Are you concerned with IOT Device isolation and security at all?
Yup, all this.

Only thing I'll add is to make sure everything you get is gigabit on the wired side, even if you don't have gigabit fiber. You'll notice it when streaming Plex within your network, for instance.
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#5
Quote from mmathis
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Yup, all this.

Only thing I'll add is to make sure everything you get is gigabit on the wired side, even if you don't have gigabit fiber. You'll notice it when streaming Plex within your network, for instance.
can you clarify this comment?
I'm confused as to why a gig device would be faster than a non-gig device when both are hooked up to a non-gig cable.
So a 10/100 on cat 5 vs 10/100/1000 on cat 5. Wouldn't both end up at 100?
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#6
I have a linksys like this...

https://express.google.com/u/0/pr...06_6136318

It streams fine for me, my wife and 3 kids. (My Cox is only the 30 meg and I have yet to notice a problem. That being said, I don't use a 4k TV and my wife/kids typically stream to a smaller TV or to a tablet.)
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#7
Quote from fyu
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can you clarify this comment?
I'm confused as to why a gig device would be faster than a non-gig device when both are hooked up to a non-gig cable.
So a 10/100 on cat 5 vs 10/100/1000 on cat 5. Wouldn't both end up at 100?
Practically speaking no, spec wise cat5 isn't rated for gig but it works just fine in most applications. The only thing I can figure is that if you had an old switch or router that didn't negotiate per port it could slow things down if you were streaming to that device. Modern networks with modern equipment can mix 10/100 and 10/100/1000 just fine.
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#8
Thank you, I now have a starting point to start researching.

I am not very tech savvy, just learning as I go. I heard good things about 'mesh'

Not sure what IOT even is... but I will research it!

Thank you guys!!!
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#9
Quote from fyu
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can you clarify this comment?
I'm confused as to why a gig device would be faster than a non-gig device when both are hooked up to a non-gig cable.
So a 10/100 on cat 5 vs 10/100/1000 on cat 5. Wouldn't both end up at 100?
I assumed when the OP said cat-5 he actually meant cat-5e, which is rated at gigabit speeds and more common.

Even so, I still wouldn't buy anything that isn't gigabit nowadays. There's no point in buying outdated tech.
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#10
Quote from mmathis
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I assumed when the OP said cat-5 he actually meant cat-5e, which is rated at gigabit speeds and more common.

Even so, I still wouldn't buy anything that isn't gigabit nowadays. There's no point in buying outdated tech.
Yes, cat-5e
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#11
Mesh is good for a home or space that is large usually consists of 3 devices that created a wireless mesh that allows you to move around and stay connected. Think of an airport for the best example, you said range is not an issue, so no need for Mesh.

You also do not mention your internet speed which does make a difference as your router needs to process more data based on your speed.

You have a thermostat that is hard wired?

I think I would go with 2 routers one a basic 2.4 for the "devices" Hive Hub and thermostat.

For the rest of your devices I would purchase a Triband Router with GB ports and a small GB Switch.


I have tested 3 Linksys Routers and while I believe they are overpriced and don't offer all the features of some other brands they do seem to last longer. Many routers start out working well then it seems heat starts to cause issues after a year or so. I have a TP Link that was highly rated and worked fine for a year then issues started.

I agree do not bother upgrading your actual cable as long as the cable is Cat5 in a home network you will be fine.

QOS (quality of service) is usually pretty simple to use depending on your router. The TVs would get the higher QOS if you were concerned about the Streaming quality, or a computer if you are gaming or video chat.


You also do not mention your Modem and that can make a difference, again heat can cause issues.
basically the more holes the better Smilie
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#12
Quote from NEWT618
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Thank you, I now have a starting point to start researching.

I am not very tech savvy, just learning as I go. I heard good things about 'mesh'

Not sure what IOT even is... but I will research it!

Thank you guys!!!
Since you said range isn't an issue you probably don't need a mesh system and most of the mesh systems are over your budget.
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#13
Quote from LiquidRetro
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Since you said range isn't an issue you probably don't need a mesh system and most of the mesh systems are over your budget.
Range is definitely not an issue. Thank you again LiquidRetro!
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#14
Quote from NEWT618
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NOTE: Range is not an issue!
Range can an will be an issue with this in mind:

Wireless is still running via the Ethernet protocol and therefore ANY device on the network via wired or wireless GETS TO HAVE IT'S TURN EVERY CYCLE.

What happens is that you have a phone or other device on your WiFi and it's barely within range with a poor or weak signal. That device gets a turn to send or decline sending data.

This 1 device can slow the entire network down, because ONLY 1 device can talk at 1 time. So all your other devices have to wait regardless if they are wired or wireless.

It's the cumulative effect of this 1 device that impacts your network.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
So with that said if you have a thermostat or other smart device that could fall under this category, it would be advisable to have it on it's own LAN segment(*) behind it's own router. That will isolate them and help prevent them from slowing down the other devices.

My Co-worker had a lot of home automation devices at his house. He has them on their own network. This helps preserve his speed and most importantly it provides an additional layer of security as IoT devices are getting hacked all the time and then doing nasty things to home network computers, etc...

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Upgrade to Cat 7??

I did wire and cable for 16 years...I would not bother with even upgrading from 5e to 6. Waste of time and money. As others have said, spend it on the electronics instead.

/food for thought



(*) There are many ways of segmenting your LAN via hard and software defined firewalls, etc...I'm sure the folks that have already replied to your post could provide many different options as I know they are very knowledgeable. bulb
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Last edited by DC July 20, 2018 at 08:15 AM.
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#15
Wireless is still running via the Ethernet protocol and therefore ANY device on the network via wired or wireless GETS TO HAVE IT'S TURN EVERY CYCLE.

What happens is that you have a phone or other device on your WiFi and it's barely within range with a poor or weak signal. That device gets a turn to send or decline sending data.

This 1 device can slow the entire network down, because ONLY 1 device can talk at 1 time. So all your other devices have to wait regardless if they are wired or wireless.

It's the cumulative effect of this 1 device that impacts your network.

Where did you get this information from?
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