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Humble Bundle: Intro to Code Bundle

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Humble Bundle.com offers their Humble Intro to Code Bundle for the Price of Your Choice (name your own price). Thanks SlickDealio

Note, these are online courses, redeem keys to access content.

Minimum price of $1+ includes:
  • Learn Python Programming by Making a Game
  • Intro to Game Development
  • Numpy Matrices and Vectors
  • Learn HTML and CSS by creating a Responsive Company Website
  • The Complete Responsive Web Design Course
  • 10% Off your first month of Humble Monthly
If you pay more than the current average of $14.64, you also unlock:
  • VR Projects - Flying Platform Experience
  • Create a Road Crossing Game with Phaser 3
  • Create a Spanish Teaching Game with Phaser 3
  • Learn Angular by Creating a Web Application
  • Blender for Beginners - Craft Low-Poly Game Assets
  • Create Your First 3D Game
  • JavaScript Programming - Learn by Making a Mobile Game
  • Beginning SQL - Store and Query Your Data
If you pay $25 or more, you also unlock:
  • Procedural Content Generation with Unity
  • VR Projects - 360 Photo Experience
  • Build a Virtual Pet Game with Phaser 3
  • Python Image Processing - Make Instagram-Style Filters
  • Create a Raspberry Pi Smart Security Camera
  • The Complete Artificial Neural Network Course
  • RPG Game Development - Turn-Based Battle Systems
  • Audio Effects and Soundtracks in Unity Games
  • Data Manipulation with Pandas
  • The Complete Guide to Bootstrap 4
  • Discover jQuery - Create Interactive Websites
  • Create an RPG Town with NPCs and Dialogs
Additionally, Humble exclusives for World of Warships is Free. Click here and scroll down the page about 1/2 of the way for more details.
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Editor's Notes & Price Research

Written by

  • All of the content in this bundle is available on the Zenva Academy website.
  • Choose where the money goes – between the publisher, Girls Who Code, Code.org and a charity of your choice via the PayPal Giving Fund. -Corwin

Original Post

Written by
Edited February 8, 2019 at 12:55 AM by
https://www.humblebundle.com/soft...ode-bundle

Awesome online courses for you. We've teamed up with Zenva Academy for our newest bundle! Get access to online courses on game development, web development, computer vision, machine learning and AI, data science and more. Plus, your purchase will support Girls Who Code, Code.org and a charity of your choice.

PAY $1 OR MORE TO UNLOCK:
  • Learn Python Programming by Making a Game
  • Intro to Game Development
  • Numpy Matrices and Vectors
  • Learn HTML and CSS by creating a Responsive Company Website
  • The Complete Responsive Web Design Course
PAY MORE THAN THE AVERAGE OF $12.29 TO ALSO UNLOCK:
  • VR Projects - Flying Platform Experience
  • Create a Road Crossing Game with Phaser 3
  • Create a Spanish Teaching Game with Phaser 3
  • Learn Angular by Creating a Web Application
  • Blender for Beginners - Craft Low-Poly Game Assets
  • Create Your First 3D Game
  • JavaScript Programming - Learn by Making a Mobile Game
  • Beginning SQL - Store and Query Your Data
PAY $25 OR MORE TO ALSO UNLOCK:
  • Procedural Content Generation with Unity
  • VR Projects - 360 Photo Experience
  • Build a Virtual Pet Game with Phaser 3
  • Python Image Processing - Make Instagram-Style Filters
  • Create a Raspberry Pi Smart Security Camera
  • The Complete Artificial Neural Network Course
  • RPG Game Development - Turn-Based Battle Systems
  • Audio Effects and Soundtracks in Unity Games
  • Data Manipulation with Pandas
  • The Complete Guide to Bootstrap 4
  • Discover jQuery - Create Interactive Websites
  • Create an RPG Town with NPCs and Dialogs
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Created 02-06-2019 at 01:38 PM by SlickDealio
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I would definitely say "it depends" (also not just based on this offering, let me elaborate). I'm in my early 30s now and had fun with MS BASIC and similar languages between 7 - 10 y/o (kids these days have it really good). However, I personally got way more enjoyment with hardware/engineering and programming than just straight coding (if your son enjoys Lego or Meccano's Erector sets, then they have some awesome STEM offerings that didn't exist 5 - 10 years ago).

I think one of the most enjoyable pieces of hardware that I would have loved as a kid, would be a Raspberry Pi. Adafruit (a hobbyist company out of NYC) has some amazing RPi kits as well for reasonable prices that include an integrated Python web-based editor and walkthroughs. I'm not sure if you have any interest in participating with your son with programming/engineering, but the RPi platform works well for solo or group experimentations.

I have no stake in Adafruit, but they have taken the time to create some nice hardware bundles that pair with an ever growing list of tutorials made by their employees and the community (not just for RPi either; Arduino has it's own ecosystem and simplified editor... both of which offer up simple examples and building blocks to start with, which then later you can combine and eventually create your own subsystems if you find it interesting enough). Heh, sorry for going a bit off-topic, however, I was always encouraged by my parents and one grandparent in particular from an early age to learn by doing with technology and I'm grateful for those experiences to this day. I hope I was able to provide some insight into what exists and might be worth checking out (of course there is a lot more, but I only wrote about what I was most familiar and pleased with).
29 Helpful?
If you send this link to journalists on Twitter, you'll get banned.
20 Helpful?
But they should learn to code.
I mean, they had no problem telling "laid off rednecks" that they needed to join the modern world and get a "real job" by learning to code.

For anyone who hasn't realized it yet, journalists DO NOT report news; they take "news" and give their opinions on it.

Journalism = opinion, and most journalists look down on and hate people who actually work
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#3
My son is about to turn 10 and has shown some interest in programming. Would this be good for his age range?
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#5
Quote from hxcmc
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My son is about to turn 10 and has shown some interest in programming. Would this be good for his age range?
I saw this suggestion about 5 years ago on a forum I frequent. https://scratch.mit.edu/
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#6
My brother is looking to get into Game Development and I'm looking to increase my virtually non-existent skills in web development, does anyone know anything about Zenva Academy classes? How do they compare to other online course sites like Pluralsight and/or urlhasbeenblocked?
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#7
Quote from balloonshark
:
I saw this suggestion about 5 years ago on a forum I frequent. https://scratch.mit.edu/
My grandson is 11 and we are learning coding using Scratch and a book from Amazon - Coding Games in Scratch: A Step-by-Step Visual Guide to Building Your Own Computer Games . He will learn the basics and then we can move on from there. It is actually a credible approach.
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#8
Quote from hxcmc :
My son is about to turn 10 and has shown some interest in programming. Would this be good for his age range?
I would definitely say "it depends" (also not just based on this offering, let me elaborate). I'm in my early 30s now and had fun with MS BASIC and similar languages between 7 - 10 y/o (kids these days have it really good). However, I personally got way more enjoyment with hardware/engineering and programming than just straight coding (if your son enjoys Lego or Meccano's Erector sets, then they have some awesome STEM offerings that didn't exist 5 - 10 years ago).

I think one of the most enjoyable pieces of hardware that I would have loved as a kid, would be a Raspberry Pi. Adafruit (a hobbyist company out of NYC) has some amazing RPi kits as well for reasonable prices that include an integrated Python web-based editor and walkthroughs. I'm not sure if you have any interest in participating with your son with programming/engineering, but the RPi platform works well for solo or group experimentations.

I have no stake in Adafruit, but they have taken the time to create some nice hardware bundles that pair with an ever growing list of tutorials made by their employees and the community (not just for RPi either; Arduino has it's own ecosystem and simplified editor... both of which offer up simple examples and building blocks to start with, which then later you can combine and eventually create your own subsystems if you find it interesting enough). Heh, sorry for going a bit off-topic, however, I was always encouraged by my parents and one grandparent in particular from an early age to learn by doing with technology and I'm grateful for those experiences to this day. I hope I was able to provide some insight into what exists and might be worth checking out (of course there is a lot more, but I only wrote about what I was most familiar and pleased with).
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#9
If you send this link to journalists on Twitter, you'll get banned.
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#10
Quote from hxcmc
:
My son is about to turn 10 and has shown some interest in programming. Would this be good for his age range?
The bundle courses (going by descriptions only) are for getting into programming seriously, with a focus on game and web development. They'll require plenty of time and dedication to complete. Probably best for middle school or older.

Bundle purchases support Girls Who Code, a great charity.

For more of a quick-start, and material specifically tailored to kids, just found these on google:
https://codewizardshq.com/coding-...-for-kids/
https://mommypoppins.com/coding-k...rogramming
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#11
Quote from DeeBG
:
I would definitely say "it depends" (also not just based on this offering, let me elaborate). I'm in my early 30s now and had fun with MS BASIC and similar languages between 7 - 10 y/o (kids these days have it really good). However, I personally got way more enjoyment with hardware/engineering and programming than just straight coding (if your son enjoys Lego or Meccano's Erector sets, then they have some awesome STEM offerings that didn't exist 5 - 10 years ago).

I think one of the most enjoyable pieces of hardware that I would have loved as a kid, would be a Raspberry Pi. Adafruit (a hobbyist company out of NYC) has some amazing RPi kits as well for reasonable prices that include an integrated Python web-based editor and walkthroughs. I'm not sure if you have any interest in participating with your son with programming/engineering, but the RPi platform works well for solo or group experimentations.

I have no stake in Adafruit, but they have taken the time to create some nice hardware bundles that pair with an ever growing list of tutorials made by their employees and the community (not just for RPi either; Arduino has it's own ecosystem and simplified editor... both of which offer up simple examples and building blocks to start with, which then later you can combine and eventually create your own subsystems if you find it interesting enough). Heh, sorry for going a bit off-topic, however, I was always encouraged by my parents and one grandparent in particular from an early age to learn by doing with technology and I'm grateful for those experiences to this day. I hope I was able to provide some insight into what exists and might be worth checking out (of course there is a lot more, but I only wrote about what I was most familiar and pleased with).
Not off topic at all. You're just confirming that you can start coding pretty much anywhere. It doesn't have to be structured; playing around and making mistakes offer some of the best learning experiences. It's so easy to get nostalgic (I also started with BASIC).

I was also going to recommend a hardware/software package for the very same points you made. Blinking LEDs are great fun when you're starting from scratch. Add a push button and speaker and they'll be hooked.

Arduino is a great platform, and even though it's suitable for beginners, it gives a surprisingly close connection to low-level hardware/software, which builds skills that will really pay off if you continue to develop them. RPi is a bit more advanced, but great too. Another thumbs up for Adafruit. They have lots of tutorials and a shop where you can buy kits and other electronics.
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#12
Quote from skyzophrenyk
:
If you send this link to journalists on Twitter, you'll get banned.
LOL was going to post the same thing
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#13
Any insight into what happens when the key expires on 2/5/2020? Do you lose what you bought, or do you just need to redeem before then?
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#14
Quote from Preon
:
Any insight into what happens when the key expires on 2/5/2020? Do you lose what you bought, or do you just need to redeem before then?
These are online courses. The few I glanced at were lifetime access, so I believe you just need to redeem them in time.

The courses on matrices and vectors, 3D programming, neural networks, and such will require some algebra knowledge.

Someone who is interested can start learning HTML, JavaScript, and Python as soon as they can read, write, and think logically, though.
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#15
Quote from hxcmc
:
My son is about to turn 10 and has shown some interest in programming. Would this be good for his age range?
code.org is free and has many different grade leveled programming. It also uses familiar faces like Minecraft and Angry Birds to teach.
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