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Kohl's Cardholders: Crock-Pot 6-Qt Express Crock Pressure Cooker + $10 KC EXPIRED

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Kohls.com has for Kohl's CardholdersCrock-Pot 6-Quart Express Crock Pressure Cooker (Stainless Steel, SCCPPC600-V1) for $48.99 when you follow the instructions below. Shipping is free or select free store pickup where stock permits. Thanks brisar

Note, you will earn $10 Kohl's Cash redeemable towards a future purchase (more info).
  1. Add 1 of the Crock-Pot 6-Quart Express Crock Pressure Cooker (Stainless Steel, SCCPPC600-V1) $79.99
  2. Enter promo codes
    • $10 off $50 in Home with HOME10
    • 30% off with PINK30
    • Free Shipping with FEBMVCFREE
  3. Total will be $48.99 + Free Shipping
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Make a multitude of menu options in this Crock-Pot Express Crock multi-cooker, which features a 6-quart pot for family dinners. Four one-touch cook settings let you pressure cook, slow cook, sauté or steam, while eight meal settings do everything from multigrain breads to homemade yoghurt. The air-tight locking lid on this Crock-Pot Express Crock multi-cooker offers safe operation.

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Edited February 10, 2019 at 09:33 AM by
**Kohl's Cardholders**

Crock-Pot 6-Quart Express Crock Pressure Cooker (Stainless Steel) [kohls.com]

$48.99 w/ codes HOME10 and PINK30

Free Shipping w/ code FEBMVCFREE

*You will earn $10 in Kohls Cash (it will get emailed, since you are within $2 of the threshold, per their FAQ [kohls.com]).

A Kohl's Card is needed for 2 of the promo codes
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This is a non-sequiter. PET is not PTFE, which is likely what the nonstick material is made out of. PTFE generally doesn't have plasticizers or other small molecules in it because it does not need to be plasticized. It also has very poor compatibility with most small molecules which would make them pointless to use anyway.

Furthermore, the hormone disrupters you talk about are only allowed in plastics in extremely small amounts in food applications, if any is used at all. Any production facility would be testing following proper protocol, though ICP-MS would only be helpful for measuring elemental analysis and not analysis of actual small molecules. You would need LCMS or GCMS for that.

Point being, PTFE can be safely heated to 350 F without issue (though it can be quite dangerous if heated above this). If you don't want to use Teflon coated pans, then don't. But please do not spread lies and misinformation. And do not equate issues of one polymer with another: that is like saying table salt is dangerous because elemental sodium and chlorine are dangerous. It just does not follow.

Source: I have a PhD in Polymer Chemistry
27 Helpful?
I'm wondering if you actually read into some of these reports which look into PTFE emissions at "normal cooking temperatures." I am guessing not because these tests are being performed at >200 Celsius when it is clearly indicated on Teflon pans that you should not heat them above 177 Celsius (350 Fahrenheit). In some cases, >200 C might be a normal cooking temperature (broiling a steak for instance), however, Teflon pans clearly indicate you should not use them for this purpose.

In fact, the science is clear that if you actually take the time to read the publications and their conclusions. Indeed, here is a publication which clearly states there is no risk to using Teflon-coated pans if used as directed and not overheated: https://www.sciencedirect.com/sci...via%3Dihub

As for your health issues, I'm glad you feel better, if it works for you, then that's all that matters for you. However, in science this is considered anecdotal evidence. Please feel free to publish your results in a peer reviewed journal; I eagerly await reading the results
9 Helpful?
You should check this out. Most of these electric cookers reach a maximum temperature that is well below the danger point of these nonstick linings.

Plus, some of us like the results and convenience from a nonstick pot.

Did you also know that the burned parts of food can contain acrylamide which could cause cancer?
7 Helpful?

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#3
EPIC Fail by Crockpot.

Instapot, Mueller, probably some others have a Stainless steel pot. Crockpot chooses to use a Nonstick pot made with a chemical lining (or many chemicals)...
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#4
Quote from Mitch22
:
EPIC Fail by Crockpot.

Instapot, Mueller, probably some others have a Stainless steel pot. Crockpot chooses to use a Nonstick pot made with a chemical lining (or many chemicals)...
Agreed. They put "Stainless Steel" in the description when they know most want the pot to be SS, not the thin outside casing.
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#5
Quote from Mitch22
:
EPIC Fail by Crockpot.

Instapot, Mueller, probably some others have a Stainless steel pot. Crockpot chooses to use a Nonstick pot made with a chemical lining (or many chemicals)...

You should check this out. Most of these electric cookers reach a maximum temperature that is well below the danger point of these nonstick linings.

Plus, some of us like the results and convenience from a nonstick pot.

Did you also know that the burned parts of food can contain acrylamide which could cause cancer?
Reply Helpful Comment? 11 4
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#6
Quote from g725s
:
Agreed. They put "Stainless Steel" in the description when they know most want the pot to be SS, not the thin outside casing.
Yes. I don't care what the outside looks like.
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#7
Quote from Mitch22
:
EPIC Fail by Crockpot.

Instapot, Mueller, probably some others have a Stainless steel pot. Crockpot chooses to use a Nonstick pot made with a chemical lining (or many chemicals)...
Number of people who get their panties twisted by non-stick pot is pretty small. Every attempt I seen to make a credible case that those pots are horrible unsafe people killers fell flat on its face.

But, hey, if it works for you, feel free to pass this deal up. You do you.
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#8
Quote from rix2357
:
You should check this out. Most of these electric cookers reach a maximum temperature that is well below the danger point of these nonstick linings.

Plus, some of us like the results and convenience from a nonstick pot.

Did you also know that the burned parts of food can contain acrylamide which could cause cancer?
You have to post scientific links to prove that, preferably with water tests done before and after heating with ICP-MS technology in a lab certified as ISO 17025.

My Mueller stays at 118 or something like that when making yogurt, and that is hot enough to strip the Antimony from PET #1 plastic, which is every water and soda bottle. This is of course probably not PET, but it demonstrates the temperature needed to leach chemicals.

Toy around with the Endocrine / Hormone disruptors in the chemical linings if you want, for the convenience of not having to soak and clean something. My Mueller scrubs clean pretty easy.

As far as burned food, regardless of whether that happens in a slow cooker as it does on the grill, you have to cook in a slow cooker with sufficient liquid, so it shouldn't be an issue.
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02-10-2019 at 10:45 AM
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#10
Quote from Mitch22
:
You have to post scientific links to prove that, preferably with water tests done before and after heating with ICP-MS technology in a lab certified as ISO 17025.

My Mueller stays at 118 or something like that when making yogurt, and that is hot enough to strip the Antimony from PET #1 plastic, which is every water and soda bottle. This is of course probably not PET, but it demonstrates the temperature needed to leach chemicals.

Toy around with the Endocrine / Hormone disruptors in the chemical linings if you want, for the convenience of not having to soak and clean something. My Mueller scrubs clean pretty easy.

As far as burned food, regardless of whether that happens in a slow cooker as it does on the grill, you have to cook in a slow cooker with sufficient liquid, so it shouldn't be an issue.
This is a non-sequiter. PET is not PTFE, which is likely what the nonstick material is made out of. PTFE generally doesn't have plasticizers or other small molecules in it because it does not need to be plasticized. It also has very poor compatibility with most small molecules which would make them pointless to use anyway.

Furthermore, the hormone disrupters you talk about are only allowed in plastics in extremely small amounts in food applications, if any is used at all. Any production facility would be testing following proper protocol, though ICP-MS would only be helpful for measuring elemental analysis and not analysis of actual small molecules. You would need LCMS or GCMS for that.

Point being, PTFE can be safely heated to 350 F without issue (though it can be quite dangerous if heated above this). If you don't want to use Teflon coated pans, then don't. But please do not spread lies and misinformation. And do not equate issues of one polymer with another: that is like saying table salt is dangerous because elemental sodium and chlorine are dangerous. It just does not follow.

Source: I have a PhD in Polymer Chemistry
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02-10-2019 at 01:16 PM
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#12
Quote from Mitch22
:
Lies and misinformation? Okay... I might be off on the test needed to detect the chemicals present in the linings of the nonstick material, but I am far from someone that spreads lies. It's widely known the chemicals in those linings are detrimental to human health, shall we talk about Birds?

As long as you are throwing around that PhD, which is essentially useless, why don't we talk about the misinformation that people like you spout off about? Why do PhD's disagree on everything under the sun? If there was a clear cut Gold standard for everything, there would be no dissenting arguments.

When I stopped using nonstick "green" pans on medium to low heat, my headaches, brain fog and dizziness dropped almost completely. So, that's how it affects me, maybe you're different. Are you saying that table salt isn't dangerous, relative to everyone on the planet?


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28913736
I'm wondering if you actually read into some of these reports which look into PTFE emissions at "normal cooking temperatures." I am guessing not because these tests are being performed at >200 Celsius when it is clearly indicated on Teflon pans that you should not heat them above 177 Celsius (350 Fahrenheit). In some cases, >200 C might be a normal cooking temperature (broiling a steak for instance), however, Teflon pans clearly indicate you should not use them for this purpose.

In fact, the science is clear that if you actually take the time to read the publications and their conclusions. Indeed, here is a publication which clearly states there is no risk to using Teflon-coated pans if used as directed and not overheated: https://www.sciencedirect.com/sci...via%3Dihub

As for your health issues, I'm glad you feel better, if it works for you, then that's all that matters for you. However, in science this is considered anecdotal evidence. Please feel free to publish your results in a peer reviewed journal; I eagerly await reading the results
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02-10-2019 at 02:51 PM
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#14
I too have an internet connection. Please give rep.
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#15
I have to be honest. I love pissing contests when I'm not involved.
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