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Nature Power 100-Watt Complete Solar Kit EXPIRED

$98
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Home Depot has Nature Power 100-Watt Complete Solar Kit (50111) on sale for $98. Shipping is free. Thanks Butcherboy

Features
  • Corrosion resistant aluminum frame and sealed against moisture this solar panel is rated for outdoor use
  • Charges 12-Volt batteries (not included)
  • Plug and play connections
  • Connect additional panels for faster charging
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Edited February 12, 2019 at 11:54 AM by
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Last Edited by FenStar February 12, 2019 at 05:03 PM
This is NOT a complete kit unless you want intermittent ~12V power. The simplest setup is going to require a battery and an inverter.

If you have no idea what you are doing you should probably look elsewhere.

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Featured Comments

https://youtu.be/gP3dhz6VSg4

This woman explains all the math involved with deciding how to efficiently choose a battery to go with a solar panel like this deal's.

Transcript here for those who don't want to watch video:
https://www.altestore.com/blog/20...lar-panel/

Quick excerpt that I felt demonstrated a real life situation:


NOTE, YOU DON'T REALLY NEED A BATTERY WITH SOLAR PANELS

https://blog.pickmysolar.com/can-...-a-battery

You can buy this deal's solar panel and connect it right to the grid. It will offer some savings to your electric bill and is easier to install, easier to maintain.
30 Helpful?
Please DO NOT attempt to do this.

1) This doesn't include an inverter, only a DC charge controller so if you try to connect it right to the AC grid you're going to let the smoke out (and some of that smoke might be you)

2) Backfeeding without having a properly installed automatic transfer switch creates a safety hazard for utility workers and anyone else doing maintenance on your home. They think the power is off, but it's not. In some places it's even illegal for this reason.
29 Helpful?
Does the sun shine brightly at night where you live?
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#4
Thanks for the post. Anyone have feedback on this deal?
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#5
Yeah I'd like to know if this is quality
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#6
Poly not mono. This would just need a battery right or any other controller?
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#7
Can someone send me a YouTube video on what practical use this has?
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#8
Quote from illmatic33
:
Can someone send me a YouTube video on what practical use this has?
https://youtu.be/gP3dhz6VSg4

This woman explains all the math involved with deciding how to efficiently choose a battery to go with a solar panel like this deal's.

Transcript here for those who don't want to watch video:
https://www.altestore.com/blog/20...lar-panel/

Quick excerpt that I felt demonstrated a real life situation:
Quote :
What can I do with that power? Well, first of all I need to store it in a battery so that I can use it later when I need it. So, I'm going to use at least a 7 amp charge controller to manage putting the power into a deep cycle battery that can be charged and discharged on a regular basis. What size battery do I need? Sorry, that calls for more math. I have my 224 watt hours that I'm making, and I'm putting it in a 12 volt battery. Because watts divided by volts equals amps, 224 watt hours divided by 12 volts equals 18.6 amp hours. Even though I'm putting it in a deep cycle battery, most batteries still don't like being drained down more than half way, so I'm going to make sure I get a battery that can hold at least twice as much power I will be using, so I'll only use half of the power in it. 18.6 amp hours x 2 = 37.2 amp hours. The amount of power a battery can store changes depending on the temperature of the room it's in. If my battery is going to be as cold as 60 degrees Fahrenheit, I need to increase the size of my battery by 11% to accommodate the cooler temps. 37.2 amp hours x 1.11 = 41.3 amp hours. I'm also going to be converting the DC power from my battery to AC using an inverter, and I'm going to lose about 5% of my power through that conversion, so 41.3 amp hours / .95 = 43.4 amp hours.

Now I don't know if you've ever been in Maine in the winter. But trust me on this one, the sun doesn't shine every day there in December. Not by a long shot. So I need to figure out how many days without sun that I need to store the power for to get me through those sunless days. Let's say I need it to last me the weekend without sun. 43.4 amp hours x 2 days = 86.9 amp hours. Great, I'm going to get myself a group 27 deep cycle battery, that's 89Ah 12V.

OK, now, I can finally figure out what I can do with that power. I can run my laptop that uses 45W for 5 hours. Because 224 Watt hours / 45W = 4.97 hours. Or I can power 3 of my 10W LED lights for 7 hours, and still have a little power left over. Or I could make myself a cup of coffee, listen to the radio while reading a book with a 10W light on for 3 hours, and use my laptop for 2 hours. This should give you enough information so that you can figure out how to fit this into your situation. You can change the numbers to fit your area, and your power needs.​
NOTE, YOU DON'T REALLY NEED A BATTERY WITH SOLAR PANELS

https://blog.pickmysolar.com/can-...-a-battery

You can buy this deal's solar panel and connect it right to the grid. It will offer some savings to your electric bill and is easier to install, easier to maintain.
Reply Helpful Comment? 37 7
Last edited by SeikenDensetsu February 12, 2019 at 12:28 PM.
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#9
Quote from SeikenDensetsu
:
https://youtu.be/gP3dhz6VSg4

This woman explains all the math involved with deciding how to efficiently choose a battery to go with a solar panel like this deal's.

Transcript here for those who don't want to watch video:
https://www.altestore.com/blog/20...lar-panel/

Quick excerpt that I felt demonstrated a real life situation:
... so you're saying this probably isn't a cheap, easy way for me to screw around with supplementing my grid usage with solar at my suburban home? Damn.
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#10
So this only comes with a charge controller? you'd probably need an inverter too I would guess
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Quote from angingrich
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... so you're saying this probably isn't a cheap, easy way for me to screw around with supplementing my grid usage with solar at my suburban home? Damn.
Sorry I added more. You don't really need a battery if you're just looking to lower your electricity bill a bit. You can be connected to grid and use solar panels at the same time. The solar panels just won't generate electricity at night and won't store power.
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#12
Quote from SeikenDensetsu
:
Sorry I added more. You don't really need a battery if you're just looking to lower your electricity bill a bit. You can be connected to grid and use solar panels at the same time. The solar panels just won't generate electricity at night and won't store power.
No problem at all, I appreciate the insight. Any tips/resources on where I can find more information about what connecting this to the grid might entail and if it will be worthwhile from a cost standpoint?
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#13
Quote from HilariousSwing206
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So this only comes with a charge controller? you'd probably need an inverter too I would guess
Yep

Here is a little diagram for those wondering
https://i.pinimg.com/originals/0e...6c8109.jpg
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#14
Quote from SeikenDensetsu
:
https://youtu.be/gP3dhz6VSg4

This woman explains all the math involved with deciding how to efficiently choose a battery to go with a solar panel like this deal's.

Transcript here for those who don't want to watch video:
https://www.altestore.com/blog/20...lar-panel/

Quick excerpt that I felt demonstrated a real life situation:


NOTE, YOU DON'T REALLY NEED A BATTERY WITH SOLAR PANELS

https://blog.pickmysolar.com/can-...-a-battery

You can buy this deal's solar panel and connect it right to the grid. It will offer some savings to your electric bill and is easier to install, easier to maintain.
I follow the concept 💯 but for practice uses such as charging computer etc. I can see the use here if you are a farmer or live on a large land and want to provide some power to let's say a hut you installed out in the cut. Or if you camp a lot... But for the majority that live on the grid.... Using this to charge laptop, play music in workshop etc would be purely entertainment as there would be very little ROI since those items draw so little power and would merely change your light bill.
I can def. See if I wanted to add an in-law suite to my property in florida this could be a consideration (will just have to figure out how much I'll need and how to get the electrician to configure things so its tied into everything (that you don't have to explain).
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#15
Quote from SeikenDensetsu
:
Yep

Here is a little diagram for those wondering
https://i.pinimg.com/originals/0e...6c8109.jpg
Thanks
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