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The Complete Learn to Code 11-Course Master Class Bundle EXPIRED

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StackSocial has The Complete Learn to Code 11-Course Master Class Bundle on sale for $29 - $17.40 off w/ promo code APRILSAVE60 = $11.60. Thanks DJ3xclusive

Includes:
  • The Complete Google Go Programming Course For Beginners
  • JavaScript Essentials: Get Started with Web Coding
  • From 0 to 1: Learn Python Programming - Easy as Pie
  • C++ for Beginners
  • Java Programming for Beginners
  • PHP & MySQL for Beginners
  • C# 7 & .NET Core 2.0 Recipes
  • Introduction to Rust Programming
  • Git Complete: The Definitive, Step-By-Step Guide
  • Perl Programming for Beginners
  • Become a Web Developer: Learn the Basics of Ruby
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StackSocial [stacksocial.com] has The Complete Learn to Code Master Class Bonus Bundle on sale for $29 - $17.40 w/ promo code APRILSAVE60 = $11.60.
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#16
Very tempted to grab this but I don't much care for Go at this point and I don't want to learn C++ without first learning C since the vast majority of kernel code is written in C.
This looks like a Microsoft bundle as they tend to have a lot more C++ code in their source bundles.
The python looks great as I need to start on that, but because it is lacking C , I think I will pass this time.
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#17
There are free courses all over the place online. I've not seen any special "magic" between the paid and free versions. Which works for you is all that matters. For some people, they need to actually attend a class to get over humps in the transfer of ideas.
How do I say this nicely, .... these courses won't make you a master of anything. These are BEGINNING COURSES in different languages. Hardly anyone would use these 11 languages. If you learn Ruby, there is little need to know Python or Perl. These languages fill similar places in the world. I've yet to find any reason to know C# or Javascript and I do webapp development. Php is taught throughout India and China. Do you really want to compete with people who can live well on 15% of the same pay? I find GoLang to be interesting, but mainly for massively parallel workloads.
Git isn't a language, but you need to know the tool.

What you need is really determined by how you learn, whether your personally and life will let you keep with something like learning a new language long enough to actually learn it?

MIT https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/intro-programming/ and Georgia Tech https://www.edx.org/school/gtx have free online courses in Python and other languages from well-known professors that anyone in the world (except Iran/NK?) can take. Have a plan for your learning. Have a schedule and keep it. Watching all the videos doesn't make you into a software guru. Doing the work in any first course might be sufficient for many people, but if you want to become a master in 1 language, plan on spending at least 5 yrs and 5,000-10,000 hours coding. There are about 2,000 work-hours in a year.

Plan to spend about 10-12 hrs a week learning any computer language. 3 days of 4 hrs ea, or 5 days of 2 hrs each. Schedule the time. Get a committed "hall pass" from your husband/wife/kids, so you will be successful. Work through whatever course and do all the exercises, even the "extra credit ones."
Also, whatever your first language might be, I'd suggest python, plan to only to python for at least 6 months or 500 hrs, so you get to the intermediate-beginner level before moving onto any other language.
For a second language, C is probably the best choice. Why? Because almost every OS and every other language is written in C. Python was written in C. Linux, MS-Windows are written in C. C is low enough level that you'll learn how computers _really_ work, unlike the script/bytecode languages (python, ruby, perl, javascript, java, and probably 100 more). But C isn't assembly code either. Do at least 500 hrs of C before moving on.

Of course, if you have a paid job doing javascript - learn that. Whatever pays the bills gets priority.

HTML and CSS aren't coding. They are page layout languages. Sorry if you disagree.

There are good things about coding. Your job can always be inside where it is warm or not too hot. After a few years "working for the man", you might be able to branch out into a little software consultancy, if you can get 15 clients to keep you busy. Do it right and you can work from anywhere in the world with a laptop and internet connection, solving real problems for clients.

Nobody will use learn all the languages in the package, so the $1.05/course isn't really true. https://www.edx.org/ has thousands of courses, for free.
And if you don't find that you love coding after doing 1 language, that's fine. Don't beat yourself up about it, but the knowledge you've gained will help you to keep all the VCR clocks set. Wink
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#18
Journalists, I hope you accept this wonderful offer
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#19
Quote from yoFu
:
There are free courses all over the place online. I've not seen any special "magic" between the paid and free versions. Which works for you is all that matters. For some people, they need to actually attend a class to get over humps in the transfer of ideas.
How do I say this nicely, .... these courses won't make you a master of anything. These are BEGINNING COURSES in different languages. Hardly anyone would use these 11 languages. If you learn Ruby, there is little need to know Python or Perl. These languages fill similar places in the world. I've yet to find any reason to know C# or Javascript and I do webapp development. Php is taught throughout India and China. Do you really want to compete with people who can live well on 15% of the same pay? I find GoLang to be interesting, but mainly for massively parallel workloads.
Git isn't a language, but you need to know the tool.

What you need is really determined by how you learn, whether your personally and life will let you keep with something like learning a new language long enough to actually learn it?

MIT https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/intro-programming/ and Georgia Tech https://www.edx.org/school/gtx have free online courses in Python and other languages from well-known professors that anyone in the world (except Iran/NK?) can take. Have a plan for your learning. Have a schedule and keep it. Watching all the videos doesn't make you into a software guru. Doing the work in any first course might be sufficient for many people, but if you want to become a master in 1 language, plan on spending at least 5 yrs and 5,000-10,000 hours coding. There are about 2,000 work-hours in a year.

Plan to spend about 10-12 hrs a week learning any computer language. 3 days of 4 hrs ea, or 5 days of 2 hrs each. Schedule the time. Get a committed "hall pass" from your husband/wife/kids, so you will be successful. Work through whatever course and do all the exercises, even the "extra credit ones."
Also, whatever your first language might be, I'd suggest python, plan to only to python for at least 6 months or 500 hrs, so you get to the intermediate-beginner level before moving onto any other language.
For a second language, C is probably the best choice. Why? Because almost every OS and every other language is written in C. Python was written in C. Linux, MS-Windows are written in C. C is low enough level that you'll learn how computers _really_ work, unlike the script/bytecode languages (python, ruby, perl, javascript, java, and probably 100 more). But C isn't assembly code either. Do at least 500 hrs of C before moving on.

Of course, if you have a paid job doing javascript - learn that. Whatever pays the bills gets priority.

HTML and CSS aren't coding. They are page layout languages. Sorry if you disagree.

There are good things about coding. Your job can always be inside where it is warm or not too hot. After a few years "working for the man", you might be able to branch out into a little software consultancy, if you can get 15 clients to keep you busy. Do it right and you can work from anywhere in the world with a laptop and internet connection, solving real problems for clients.

Nobody will use learn all the languages in the package, so the $1.05/course isn't really true. https://www.edx.org/ has thousands of courses, for free.
And if you don't find that you love coding after doing 1 language, that's fine. Don't beat yourself up about it, but the knowledge you've gained will help you to keep all the VCR clocks set. Wink
I've been on the cyber & cloud security side for a while now and been thinking about adding some tools to the tool box...This is great advice. I hope people take the time to read your post.
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#20
Quote from yoFu
:
There are free courses all over the place online. I've not seen any special "magic" between the paid and free versions. Which works for you is all that matters. For some people, they need to actually attend a class to get over humps in the transfer of ideas.
How do I say this nicely, .... these courses won't make you a master of anything. These are BEGINNING COURSES in different languages. Hardly anyone would use these 11 languages. If you learn Ruby, there is little need to know Python or Perl. These languages fill similar places in the world. I've yet to find any reason to know C# or Javascript and I do webapp development. Php is taught throughout India and China. Do you really want to compete with people who can live well on 15% of the same pay? I find GoLang to be interesting, but mainly for massively parallel workloads.
Git isn't a language, but you need to know the tool.

What you need is really determined by how you learn, whether your personally and life will let you keep with something like learning a new language long enough to actually learn it?

MIT https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/intro-programming/ and Georgia Tech https://www.edx.org/school/gtx have free online courses in Python and other languages from well-known professors that anyone in the world (except Iran/NK?) can take. Have a plan for your learning. Have a schedule and keep it. Watching all the videos doesn't make you into a software guru. Doing the work in any first course might be sufficient for many people, but if you want to become a master in 1 language, plan on spending at least 5 yrs and 5,000-10,000 hours coding. There are about 2,000 work-hours in a year.

Plan to spend about 10-12 hrs a week learning any computer language. 3 days of 4 hrs ea, or 5 days of 2 hrs each. Schedule the time. Get a committed "hall pass" from your husband/wife/kids, so you will be successful. Work through whatever course and do all the exercises, even the "extra credit ones."
Also, whatever your first language might be, I'd suggest python, plan to only to python for at least 6 months or 500 hrs, so you get to the intermediate-beginner level before moving onto any other language.
For a second language, C is probably the best choice. Why? Because almost every OS and every other language is written in C. Python was written in C. Linux, MS-Windows are written in C. C is low enough level that you'll learn how computers _really_ work, unlike the script/bytecode languages (python, ruby, perl, javascript, java, and probably 100 more). But C isn't assembly code either. Do at least 500 hrs of C before moving on.

Of course, if you have a paid job doing javascript - learn that. Whatever pays the bills gets priority.

HTML and CSS aren't coding. They are page layout languages. Sorry if you disagree.

There are good things about coding. Your job can always be inside where it is warm or not too hot. After a few years "working for the man", you might be able to branch out into a little software consultancy, if you can get 15 clients to keep you busy. Do it right and you can work from anywhere in the world with a laptop and internet connection, solving real problems for clients.

Nobody will use learn all the languages in the package, so the $1.05/course isn't really true. https://www.edx.org/ has thousands of courses, for free.
And if you don't find that you love coding after doing 1 language, that's fine. Don't beat yourself up about it, but the knowledge you've gained will help you to keep all the VCR clocks set. Wink
Wow, excellent suggestions. Thanks fir taking the time. Very helpful!
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#21
Quote from yoFu
:
There are free courses all over the place online. I've not seen any special "magic" between the paid and free versions. Which works for you is all that matters. For some people, they need to actually attend a class to get over humps in the transfer of ideas.
How do I say this nicely, .... these courses won't make you a master of anything. These are BEGINNING COURSES in different languages. Hardly anyone would use these 11 languages. If you learn Ruby, there is little need to know Python or Perl. These languages fill similar places in the world. I've yet to find any reason to know C# or Javascript and I do webapp development. Php is taught throughout India and China. Do you really want to compete with people who can live well on 15% of the same pay? I find GoLang to be interesting, but mainly for massively parallel workloads.
Git isn't a language, but you need to know the tool.

What you need is really determined by how you learn, whether your personally and life will let you keep with something like learning a new language long enough to actually learn it?

MIT https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/intro-programming/ and Georgia Tech https://www.edx.org/school/gtx have free online courses in Python and other languages from well-known professors that anyone in the world (except Iran/NK?) can take. Have a plan for your learning. Have a schedule and keep it. Watching all the videos doesn't make you into a software guru. Doing the work in any first course might be sufficient for many people, but if you want to become a master in 1 language, plan on spending at least 5 yrs and 5,000-10,000 hours coding. There are about 2,000 work-hours in a year.

Plan to spend about 10-12 hrs a week learning any computer language. 3 days of 4 hrs ea, or 5 days of 2 hrs each. Schedule the time. Get a committed "hall pass" from your husband/wife/kids, so you will be successful. Work through whatever course and do all the exercises, even the "extra credit ones."
Also, whatever your first language might be, I'd suggest python, plan to only to python for at least 6 months or 500 hrs, so you get to the intermediate-beginner level before moving onto any other language.
For a second language, C is probably the best choice. Why? Because almost every OS and every other language is written in C. Python was written in C. Linux, MS-Windows are written in C. C is low enough level that you'll learn how computers _really_ work, unlike the script/bytecode languages (python, ruby, perl, javascript, java, and probably 100 more). But C isn't assembly code either. Do at least 500 hrs of C before moving on.

Of course, if you have a paid job doing javascript - learn that. Whatever pays the bills gets priority.

HTML and CSS aren't coding. They are page layout languages. Sorry if you disagree.

There are good things about coding. Your job can always be inside where it is warm or not too hot. After a few years "working for the man", you might be able to branch out into a little software consultancy, if you can get 15 clients to keep you busy. Do it right and you can work from anywhere in the world with a laptop and internet connection, solving real problems for clients.

Nobody will use learn all the languages in the package, so the $1.05/course isn't really true. https://www.edx.org/ has thousands of courses, for free.
And if you don't find that you love coding after doing 1 language, that's fine. Don't beat yourself up about it, but the knowledge you've gained will help you to keep all the VCR clocks set. Wink

Excellent comment -I have a programming degree from decades ago - that I never used - and now that the idea of these courses has diminished in my mind - you put the idea completely out of my head - Thanks.
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#22
Seems like a decent option for journalists
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#23
Quote from roadrun777
:
Very tempted to grab this but I don't much care for Go at this point and I don't want to learn C++ without first learning C since the vast majority of kernel code is written in C.
This looks like a Microsoft bundle as they tend to have a lot more C++ code in their source bundles.
The python looks great as I need to start on that, but because it is lacking C , I think I will pass this time.
The only item in this bundle that's Microsoft-oriented is the C#/.NET thing.
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God Help Me! Must Buy!
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#24
Quote from lucassdad
:
For the journalists you know...
Quote from traderjose
:
Watch out for the Twitter police.
Damn beat me to it. I sitting here laughing imagining Google, Twitter and Facebook algorithms along with their content banning star chambers pondering how to handle this.
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#25
Anyone familiar with the JS and/or Git courses?
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#26
To all the coders out there. How do you like your work? Is it taxing on the body mentally and physically? Thinking about this field but is it too late to get in when you are in your early 40s? Thanks!
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#27
Quote from Tnyc
:
To all the coders out there. How do you like your work? Is it taxing on the body mentally and physically? Thinking about this field but is it too late to get in when you are in your early 40s? Thanks!
no, no, no
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#28
since when people started to paying for online training video?

honestly, if u can't master the process of finding free resource online and use it, IT might not be a good choice for u.
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#29
What kind of income range do coders expect?
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#30
Quote from hulksweider
:
Excellent comment -I have a programming degree from decades ago - that I never used - and now that the idea of these courses has diminished in my mind - you put the idea completely out of my head - Thanks.
Just trying to provide some realism to the "Learn X programming in 50 days" people.
For many people, coding is a wonderful career or stepping stone to other careers. Having some coding knowledge like a beginning-level course in 1 language is extremely useful in the world today.
For example, I took both Auto Mechanics and Electronics in high school. Both of those beginning courses made it so I wouldn't be taken getting my vehicles fixed or could look inside most broken home electonics/household appliances and know what is likely to be an issue. A beginning level coding class is similar. I don't always want to fix my steering or even change the oil, but I could.
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