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LG 70" Class (69.5" Diag.) 4K Ultra HD LED LCD TV + 3 yr Square Trade Warranty $799.97

$799.97
+14 Deal Score
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Purchase 3 Year SquareTrade Warranty ($64.99) and this TV, Receive $65 Off Total Purchase
TruMotion 120
HDR Compatible
802.11ac Wi-Fi
WebOS Smart

https://www.costco.com/LG-70%22-C...12287.html
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$799.97

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#2
Slightly ignorant question, but what is the difference between a TV having HDR, HDR10, or HDR compatible?
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#3
Quote from hurtmeplease
:
Slightly ignorant question, but what is the difference between a TV having HDR, HDR10, or HDR compatible?
The naming scheme for many TV's will vary, as HDR10 or HDR10+ is seen on newer displays. HDR compatible is the lowest standard for a display to have the badge of HDR, but don't expect any real performance out of it.
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#4
Ok. Thanks.
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#5
Quote from hurtmeplease
:
Slightly ignorant question, but what is the difference between a TV having HDR, HDR10, or HDR compatible?
It gets kind-of complex. The original idea was that it could take a different format which gives more "bits" of brightness resolution. Early TVs wouldn't even accept the format, and later the high-end ones accepted it and could display it properly. Now, almost all TVs accept the format (it's rare to see a non-HDR "compatible" TV in 2019). So you can't really use the presence of "HDR" in the name as an indication of picture quality.

The difference is that the cheaper models (like this would be for a 70" at this price), take the data and do "the best they can' in trying to show it on their panels. I.e. they don't really show it at the full quality it could give, because the panels aren't good enough. Some try a clever technique to "fudge" the resolution by taking adjacent pixels and modifying the value so that the "average" that your eyes see approximates what was intended -- but of course, not ideal. Manufacturers tend to "hide" the systems they use and not disclose it, but research on the net can yield lots of good info on technical aspects of almost all brands (for example, most of the LG "budget" TVs are really 2.8K, not 4K -- which doesn't directly related to HDR but is interesting if you really want 4K)

Once you get to the more expensive models, they have different panels that can more correctly and accurately show all the image data that is coming over the HDMI port -- especially if it has "HDR" content -- the question is how well does the panel display it? There is a significant price difference of about 2-4x going from the basic line to the premium lines (i.e. Samsung "QLED," and LG "OLED" which uses different screen technology).
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#6
Been the same price for weeks

Was debating between this and the 70" Vizio at Costco, price point is about the same
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#7
Quote from pmarin
:
It gets kind-of complex. The original idea was that it could take a different format which gives more "bits" of brightness resolution. Early TVs wouldn't even accept the format, and later the high-end ones accepted it and could display it properly. Now, almost all TVs accept the format (it's rare to see a non-HDR "compatible" TV in 2019). So you can't really use the presence of "HDR" in the name as an indication of picture quality.

The difference is that the cheaper models (like this would be for a 70" at this price), take the data and do "the best they can' in trying to show it on their panels. I.e. they don't really show it at the full quality it could give, because the panels aren't good enough. Some try a clever technique to "fudge" the resolution by taking adjacent pixels and modifying the value so that the "average" that your eyes see approximates what was intended -- but of course, not ideal. Manufacturers tend to "hide" the systems they use and not disclose it, but research on the net can yield lots of good info on technical aspects of almost all brands (for example, most of the LG "budget" TVs are really 2.8K, not 4K -- which doesn't directly related to HDR but is interesting if you really want 4K)

Once you get to the more expensive models, they have different panels that can more correctly and accurately show all the image data that is coming over the HDMI port -- especially if it has "HDR" content -- the question is how well does the panel display it? There is a significant price difference of about 2-4x going from the basic line to the premium lines (i.e. Samsung "QLED," and LG "OLED" which uses different screen technology).
Thank you. We can all learn a little more each day!
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#8
Quote from pmarin
:
It gets kind-of complex. The original idea was that it could take a different format which gives more "bits" of brightness resolution. Early TVs wouldn't even accept the format, and later the high-end ones accepted it and could display it properly. Now, almost all TVs accept the format (it's rare to see a non-HDR "compatible" TV in 2019). So you can't really use the presence of "HDR" in the name as an indication of picture quality.

The difference is that the cheaper models (like this would be for a 70" at this price), take the data and do "the best they can' in trying to show it on their panels. I.e. they don't really show it at the full quality it could give, because the panels aren't good enough. Some try a clever technique to "fudge" the resolution by taking adjacent pixels and modifying the value so that the "average" that your eyes see approximates what was intended -- but of course, not ideal. Manufacturers tend to "hide" the systems they use and not disclose it, but research on the net can yield lots of good info on technical aspects of almost all brands (for example, most of the LG "budget" TVs are really 2.8K, not 4K -- which doesn't directly related to HDR but is interesting if you really want 4K)

Once you get to the more expensive models, they have different panels that can more correctly and accurately show all the image data that is coming over the HDMI port -- especially if it has "HDR" content -- the question is how well does the panel display it? There is a significant price difference of about 2-4x going from the basic line to the premium lines (i.e. Samsung "QLED," and LG "OLED" which uses different screen technology).
repped for educating me....
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