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Honeywell 7060 - 17 kW Air-Cooled Standby Generator Set w/ 200 Amp Switch (HSB) $2699

$2,699.00
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This is a steal! A 17KW Generator with a transfer switch cost over $4K! This was posted on here once when is was $2,999.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Honeywel...3727130826
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Created 05-04-2019 at 03:17 PM by ElatedWealth339
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$2,699.00

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#2
The seller seems shady -- I don't think that Generac directly would only have 68 reviews?

This same unit was on sale last fall from Costco at 2950. I ordered one, but it ended up being damaged in shipment, and unable to be replaced -- they substituted it with a Cummins (I had to pay most of the difference in MSRPs). Of course, once you install a generator the utility power never seems to go out again...


Expect at least 2-3k for installation and material costs.
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#3
Quote from JonathanL8121
:
The seller seems shady -- I don't think that Generac directly would only have 68 reviews?

This same unit was on sale last fall from Costco at 2950. I ordered one, but it ended up being damaged in shipment, and unable to be replaced -- they substituted it with a Cummins (I had to pay most of the difference in MSRPs). Of course, once you install a generator the utility power never seems to go out again...


Expect at least 2-3k for installation and material costs.
You sure have some expensive electricians. No where near that cost in Arizona! In for one.
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#4
Quote from PatrickM3469
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You sure have some expensive electricians. No where near that cost in Arizona! In for one.
It was about half material and half labor. Part of the problem is you will need an electrician AND a plumber. You will need wire that was about $4 ($1 per strand) per foot between your transfer panel and generator (4AWG, this unit may only require 6AWG), likely a new shielded service wire (4/0), wire between the transfer switch and main panel (4/0, with a ground), along with 1" black pipe. In my case, gas and electric service enter the property on opposite sides. You may be able to reduce these costs with shorter runs of wire and pipe, depending on your desired location and zoning requirements (my town has minimum distances from property lines).

It took two people working electrical about 8 hours to install, and about 4 hours for a plumber. The plumber will likely need to run a new main trunk directly off the meter to get enough flow. You need to rewire much of your main electrical panel to do it properly (you need to unbond neutral and bond in your main panel), as well as work on the service line of the house. This is not an easy DIY installation. Conceptually, it sounded easy, but I saw them do it -- it was not. Working with service wire did not look like fun.

Also costs to note were building a gravel pad, a mounting surface (Cummins directions mandate a concrete slab, Generac/Honeywell does not), a larger gas meter (a unit this size was near the flow limit of a typical residential meter here), a car battery, and electrical permits and licenses.


I received a quote for a regular install of a Generac unit from a dealer, and it was around $9k for the unit and installation (all costs included).


Also for anyone curious, I estimated the cost of running this at approximately $50 per day on natural gas. Not trivial if you need it for a few days, but certainly not crazy.
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Last edited by JonathanL8121 May 4, 2019 at 07:20 PM.
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#5
I am on the fence about getting one, but I would also need a 250 gal propane tank hookup because I do not have NG. So that 2-3K will probably be in my range too. 2600 is not a bad price for a 17KW
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#6
I have a generac... seems like i'm wasting $300 once or twice a year just for it to run once a week in test mode...
(it came with the house) and now the effer wont' start so it needs servicing... and i had to change the battery of course... and i may to call a repair man to fix it...

I think i'd rather have a typical wheeled generator.. would make it easier to take in for servicing and have pull start backup (or main starting) plus a lot cheaper...

since i already have one installed, shouldn't it be cheap easy to install a port to use a wheeled unit as a backup?
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#7
Yup, after a 10 day power outage a decade ago our neighbor got one of these and we got a wheeled one. Have needed it maybe 2 times since then, each power outage less than a day. Your power has to go out a lot for a permanent generator to make sense IMHO.
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Quote from infin8007
:
I have a generac... seems like i'm wasting $300 once or twice a year just for it to run once a week in test mode...
(it came with the house) and now the effer wont' start so it needs servicing... and i had to change the battery of course... and i may to call a repair man to fix it...

I think i'd rather have a typical wheeled generator.. would make it easier to take in for servicing and have pull start backup (or main starting) plus a lot cheaper...

since i already have one installed, shouldn't it be cheap easy to install a port to use a wheeled unit as a backup?
Not really. There's two main ways of installing these, depending on the type of switch. This unit comes with a whole-house transfer switch, which sits between your service panel and electric meter. This energizes your entire panel, and your entire house is on generator power. The other option allows you to select individual circuits, and sits more along-side your electric panel. This is more similar to what you would do with a manual generator, but the switches that come with these are automatic, and have circuits that determine when to switch. I am not sure of how you could do this effectively manually. Mine has, and I think the Generac has, a manual override function for if the automatic switching fails, but you would have to remove the panel, expose the potentially energized contacts, and manually move the selector to the alternate contacts (ie. from utility to generator, or vise-versa). I would only recommend doing this in an emergency (ie. power is out, transfer switch fails), and be careful, as you are exposing yourself to 200 amps of current, with no shielding.

Perhaps your unit is either old or in disrepair? There's not a ton to these things, it's just a small engine, alternator, and some circuitboards. The main maintenance items seem to be oil changes (and filters), spark plugs, and battery items. The idea of the self-test is to alert you to these items before you rely on the unit, which it sounds like it did. I know when I looked into purchasing mine, many problems seem to relate to not having adequate gas flow or pressure. These units use a large amount of fuel, and you need to be sure you have adequate fuel supply to the unit.
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Quote from EpicMemes
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Yup, after a 10 day power outage a decade ago our neighbor got one of these and we got a wheeled one. Have needed it maybe 2 times since then, each power outage less than a day. Your power has to go out a lot for a permanent generator to make sense IMHO.
I went through that logic when I purchased mine -- the main concern I have with wheeled units is fuel supply. I felt like I would need a 4-day supply to be reasonable, but perhaps I am paranoid. At least here, many of our power outages are accompanied by snow, which can make getting additional fuel difficult. This meant that I would need 30+ gallons of fuel on site, which just seems unrealistic. Am I just being paranoid? Larger wheeled units (8-12KW range) claim to use at least 5 gallons per 8 hours. The other alternative is an inverter style generator (ex. Honda), but these get pricey once you get out of the ~2KW range.

Other concerns are if your house is unoccupied (or you are sleeping) -- I know my basement can flood in a few hours if the sump pump is offline.
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#10
Quote from JonathanL8121
:
Not really. There's two main ways of installing these, depending on the type of switch. This unit comes with a whole-house transfer switch, which sits between your service panel and electric meter. This energizes your entire panel, and your entire house is on generator power. The other option allows you to select individual circuits, and sits more along-side your electric panel. This is more similar to what you would do with a manual generator, but the switches that come with these are automatic, and have circuits that determine when to switch. I am not sure of how you could do this effectively manually. Mine has, and I think the Generac has, a manual override function for if the automatic switching fails, but you would have to remove the panel, expose the potentially energized contacts, and manually move the selector to the alternate contacts (ie. from utility to generator, or vise-versa). I would only recommend doing this in an emergency (ie. power is out, transfer switch fails), and be careful, as you are exposing yourself to 200 amps of current, with no shielding.

Perhaps your unit is either old or in disrepair? There's not a ton to these things, it's just a small engine, alternator, and some circuitboards. The main maintenance items seem to be oil changes (and filters), spark plugs, and battery items. The idea of the self-test is to alert you to these items before you rely on the unit, which it sounds like it did. I know when I looked into purchasing mine, many problems seem to relate to not having adequate gas flow or pressure. These units use a large amount of fuel, and you need to be sure you have adequate fuel supply to the unit.
Mine has the secondary panel installed.
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#11
Quote from JonathanL8121
:
I went through that logic when I purchased mine -- the main concern I have with wheeled units is fuel supply. I felt like I would need a 4-day supply to be reasonable, but perhaps I am paranoid. At least here, many of our power outages are accompanied by snow, which can make getting additional fuel difficult. This meant that I would need 30+ gallons of fuel on site, which just seems unrealistic. Am I just being paranoid? Larger wheeled units (8-12KW range) claim to use at least 5 gallons per 8 hours. The other alternative is an inverter style generator (ex. Honda), but these get pricey once you get out of the ~2KW range.

Other concerns are if your house is unoccupied (or you are sleeping) -- I know my basement can flood in a few hours if the sump pump is offline.
The solution to that problem is to get a wheeled unit that can run on propane. Then you can either get a 125 or 250 gal propane tank to run it, or hook it up to your existing tank if you already have propane. I already have propane, so I had the propane company put a quick disconnect in (similar to that used for an air compressor, but bigger and tougher). Power goes out, I plug my 8KW portable in to an inlet, flip over the interlock on my panel, plug it into propane, and I'm good to go until it needs an oil change. Since my generator is so far from the propane tank, I don't even have to shut it off for them to fill up the tank. The only downside over the permanent unit is that you have to drag yourself out in the freezing rain / sleet / snow in the middle of the night and hook it up with a flashlight when the power goes out (our house is old and drafty, and gets cold really fast without power, so it can't wait until morning in the middle of winter). If you do get a portable, make sure you get one that specifies low THD (< 5%).
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#12
The unit is now posted at $2,499 and 95 sold! Wow!
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#13
Quote from JonathanL8121
:
The seller seems shady -- I don't think that Generac directly would only have 68 reviews?

This same unit was on sale last fall from Costco at 2950. I ordered one, but it ended up being damaged in shipment, and unable to be replaced -- they substituted it with a Cummins (I had to pay most of the difference in MSRPs). Of course, once you install a generator the utility power never seems to go out again...


Expect at least 2-3k for installation and material costs.
I thought the same thing and when I saw that and they told me that they just launched their store on EBay at the end of last year so that's why they don't have 1,000's of reviews yet. My unit showed up perfectly and just bought another after the price went down to 2,499!
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#14
Quote from JonathanL8121
:
It was about half material and half labor. Part of the problem is you will need an electrician AND a plumber. You will need wire that was about $4 ($1 per strand) per foot between your transfer panel and generator (4AWG, this unit may only require 6AWG), likely a new shielded service wire (4/0), wire between the transfer switch and main panel (4/0, with a ground), along with 1" black pipe. In my case, gas and electric service enter the property on opposite sides. You may be able to reduce these costs with shorter runs of wire and pipe, depending on your desired location and zoning requirements (my town has minimum distances from property lines).

It took two people working electrical about 8 hours to install, and about 4 hours for a plumber. The plumber will likely need to run a new main trunk directly off the meter to get enough flow. You need to rewire much of your main electrical panel to do it properly (you need to unbond neutral and bond in your main panel), as well as work on the service line of the house. This is not an easy DIY installation. Conceptually, it sounded easy, but I saw them do it -- it was not. Working with service wire did not look like fun.

Also costs to note were building a gravel pad, a mounting surface (Cummins directions mandate a concrete slab, Generac/Honeywell does not), a larger gas meter (a unit this size was near the flow limit of a typical residential meter here), a car battery, and electrical permits and licenses.


I received a quote for a regular install of a Generac unit from a dealer, and it was around $9k for the unit and installation (all costs included).


Also for anyone curious, I estimated the cost of running this at approximately $50 per day on natural gas. Not trivial if you need it for a few days, but certainly not crazy.
Wow your guys work slow. I had an hour of plumbing and maybe 2 or 3 hours of electrical install, but I do have the whole house switch, which saves a pile of time.
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