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MSI Radeon RX 570 8GB Video Card + 512GB Intel 660p M.2 PCIe NVMe SSD

$170
$225.98
after $20 Rebate + Free S&H
+40 Deal Score
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Newegg has MSI Radeon RX 570 ARMOR 8GB OC Video Card + 512GB Intel 660p M.2 PCIe NVMe SSD + AMD 2 Games for 50TH Bundle for $189.98 - $20 Rebate = $169.98. Shipping is free. Thanks Discombobulated

Note, AMD 2 Games for 50TH Bundle will automatically be added in cart. Offer valid until May 20, 2019 at 11:59 PM PT or while supplies last.
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Editor's Notes & Price Research

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  • AMD 2 Games for 50TH Bundle includes Tom Clancy's The Division 2 Gold Edition & World War Z. Redemption instructions will be sent via email.
  • Limit 1 rebate card per household
  • Refer to the rebate terms & conditions for a full list of details.

Original Post

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Edited May 16, 2019 at 05:58 AM by
Newegg

For those interested

Note, offer valid through May 20, 2019 or while supplies last. Limit one rebate per household
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Created 05-16-2019 at 12:44 AM by Discombobulated
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First off, those two are different animals with two different interfaces. The MX500 is SATA while the 660p is NVMe x4. The MX500 nearly maxes out the SATA connector, while the 660p is 2-3x the speed but still just middle of the pack for the 4 PCI lane (x4) NVMe ssd interface.

Second, what makes the 660p a just ok NVMe ssd is that it uses new, slower, very dense QLC flash NAND RAM chips, whereas higher end NVMe ssds in the marketplace now use older but faster TLC RAM chips. (QLC is found on the Crucial P1 and on one Samsung model.)

In practice, the ssd controller on the 660p mitigates this with a dynamic SLC cache (and a SLC cache is used to speed up many TLC drives including the MX500). But as the drive fills up, the SLC cache size shrinks from ~100GB to ~10GB and write performance degrades. Additionally, during very large writes (like cloning the drive) the SLC cache fills and the QLC speeds slow way down, down to mechanical hard drive speeds.

Despite that, in the real world most consumers don't write that many GB of data at one time very often. Note that read speeds are unaffected by this issue, and the same problem doesn't exist for the (slower to begin with but relatively steady) MX500. And even the MX500 loses about 20% of its write speed at the end of very large writes--when it is actually faster than the QLC drives.

Also, some people object to QLC as well because it will wear out sooner than TLC, though this is mathematically unlikely unless one is constantly writing huge volumes of data to the drive every day (e.g. a datacenter).

There are other differences that matter for NVMe ssd drives as well, and the current QLC drives are only about 1/2 to 2/3 as fast as the fastest NVMe drives now on the market, although they are faster than the old x2 NVMe drives (= ok).

All that said, the 660p is a fine drive (and much better than a MX500 in almost all use cases). I used the very similar Crucial P1 1TB (and an adapter) to upgrade a 2013 retina macbook pro and other than during the initial drive cloning, speeds have been a vast improvement over stock--not to mention having free drive space. Given the SLC cache / drive full issue, I would tend to recommend the larger sizes though.

NewEgg has a nice introductory guide if this is greek to you.
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#4
That Armor version gets really loud at times. I have just tested two RX 580 Armor 4GB I have got on Newegg for $130 each and they work, run Division 2 nicely, but they get really noisy during gaming. Big cooler that looks capable but runs insufficient. And the card bends like crazy, long and "soft".
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#5
Quote from kit10dog
:
That Armor version gets really loud at times. I have just tested two RX 580 Armor 4GB I have got on Newegg for $130 each and they work, run Division 2 nicely, but they get really noisy during gaming. Big cooler that looks capable but runs insufficient. And the card bends like crazy, long and "soft".

I read your reply and it made me realize there are two version of this card. I have the RX 580 Mk2. (The 570 comes in a Mk2 also). The Mk2 adds a backplate, and redesigned fans. I've seen fan shutdown on mine when idle, and looking at the pictures they are a little larger on Mk2. I've only used mine during some ethical hacking (password cracking) competitions. I can't really talk about the noise because mine was running outside my case on an extension riser.
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#6
Seems like an ok deal. More worth it if you really want the games. It is nice that it's an 8GB card and not the 4GB version and the SSD is just an OK SSD.
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#7
Quote from paulk11087
:
Seems like an ok deal. More worth it if you really want the games. It is nice that it's an 8GB card and not the 4GB version and the SSD is just an OK SSD.
I thought the 660P was one of the best budget SSDs out there, along with MX500?
What makes it just "OK" ?

Thanks!
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#8
Quote from kc0716slick
:
I thought the 660P was one of the best budget SSDs out there, along with MX500?
What makes it just "OK" ?

Thanks!
First off, those two are different animals with two different interfaces. The MX500 is SATA while the 660p is NVMe x4. The MX500 nearly maxes out the SATA connector, while the 660p is 2-3x the speed but still just middle of the pack for the 4 PCI lane (x4) NVMe ssd interface.

Second, what makes the 660p a just ok NVMe ssd is that it uses new, slower, very dense QLC flash NAND RAM chips, whereas higher end NVMe ssds in the marketplace now use older but faster TLC RAM chips. (QLC is found on the Crucial P1 and on one Samsung model.)

In practice, the ssd controller on the 660p mitigates this with a dynamic SLC cache (and a SLC cache is used to speed up many TLC drives including the MX500). But as the drive fills up, the SLC cache size shrinks from ~100GB to ~10GB and write performance degrades. Additionally, during very large writes (like cloning the drive) the SLC cache fills and the QLC speeds slow way down, down to mechanical hard drive speeds.

Despite that, in the real world most consumers don't write that many GB of data at one time very often. Note that read speeds are unaffected by this issue, and the same problem doesn't exist for the (slower to begin with but relatively steady) MX500. And even the MX500 loses about 20% of its write speed at the end of very large writes--when it is actually faster than the QLC drives.

Also, some people object to QLC as well because it will wear out sooner than TLC, though this is mathematically unlikely unless one is constantly writing huge volumes of data to the drive every day (e.g. a datacenter).

There are other differences that matter for NVMe ssd drives as well, and the current QLC drives are only about 1/2 to 2/3 as fast as the fastest NVMe drives now on the market, although they are faster than the old x2 NVMe drives (= ok).

All that said, the 660p is a fine drive (and much better than a MX500 in almost all use cases). I used the very similar Crucial P1 1TB (and an adapter) to upgrade a 2013 retina macbook pro and other than during the initial drive cloning, speeds have been a vast improvement over stock--not to mention having free drive space. Given the SLC cache / drive full issue, I would tend to recommend the larger sizes though.

NewEgg has a nice introductory guide if this is greek to you.
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#9
Not a good deal. Specially with rebates.

You can get a better deal if you buy them separately and without a rebate.
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#10
I have had this card for about 45 days and it has caused me nothing but headaches. I actually have an RMA to send it in and I haven't decided if it is worth it yet. Newegg wouldn't help because it had a rebate. PC just randomly crashes after showing a solid color on my monitors and then the fans from the card going full speed for a few seconds. It is super inconsistent and will go a week without happening and then it will happen five times in an hour. Only option to get out of it is a hard restart. I have tried everything including DDU, updating drivers, installing Afterburner, deleting Afterburner, settings tweaks with Wattman, etc. These crashes happen just with simple word processing and such as I rarely play games. I keep searching for some magic thing that will bring stability, but just can't find it. If you read the one and two star reviews on Newegg you will see that many have a similar problem. This is likely the reason they are now bundling it with the SSD is to clean house as the average reviews are probably going to keep going down.
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#11
The 660p doesn't have dram? I remember trying to research but couldn't find it and was impatient.
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#12
Quote from CheaperMoFo
:
First off, those two are different animals with two different interfaces. The MX500 is SATA while the 660p is NVMe x4. The MX500 nearly maxes out the SATA connector, while the 660p is 2-3x the speed but still just middle of the pack for the 4 PCI lane (x4) NVMe ssd interface.

Second, what makes the 660p a just ok NVMe ssd is that it uses new, slower, very dense QLC flash NAND RAM chips, whereas higher end NVMe ssds in the marketplace now use older but faster TLC RAM chips. (QLC is found on the Crucial P1 and on one Samsung model.)

In practice, the ssd controller on the 660p mitigates this with a dynamic SLC cache (and a SLC cache is used to speed up many TLC drives including the MX500). But as the drive fills up, the SLC cache size shrinks from ~100GB to ~10GB and write performance degrades. Additionally, during very large writes (like cloning the drive) the SLC cache fills and the QLC speeds slow way down, down to mechanical hard drive speeds.

Despite that, in the real world most consumers don't write that many GB of data at one time very often. Note that read speeds are unaffected by this issue, and the same problem doesn't exist for the (slower to begin with but relatively steady) MX500. And even the MX500 loses about 20% of its write speed at the end of very large writes--when it is actually faster than the QLC drives.

Also, some people object to QLC as well because it will wear out sooner than TLC, though this is mathematically unlikely unless one is constantly writing huge volumes of data to the drive every day (e.g. a datacenter).

There are other differences that matter for NVMe ssd drives as well, and the current QLC drives are only about 1/2 to 2/3 as fast as the fastest NVMe drives now on the market, although they are faster than the old x2 NVMe drives (= ok).

All that said, the 660p is a fine drive (and much better than a MX500 in almost all use cases). I used the very similar Crucial P1 1TB (and an adapter) to upgrade a 2013 retina macbook pro and other than during the initial drive cloning, speeds have been a vast improvement over stock--not to mention having free drive space. Given the SLC cache / drive full issue, I would tend to recommend the larger sizes though.

NewEgg has a nice introductory guide if this is greek to you.
Ohhh there's an adapter for the rMBP to use a normal NVME ssd? Fabulous? Is it active or passive? Performance? Price? Recommendations?
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#13
Quote from kc0716slick
:
I thought the 660P was one of the best budget SSDs out there, along with MX500?
What makes it just "OK" ?

Thanks!
So it has a dram + slc or its dram-less
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#14
In case you didn't know, the AMD games have to be activated (you don't get keys) on the computer in which you installed the graphics card! So you can't get the graphics card for someone and keep the games, or vice versa.
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#15
Quote from fiveohfour
:
Ohhh there's an adapter for the rMBP to use a normal NVME ssd? Fabulous? Is it active or passive? Performance? Price? Recommendations?
Yes. I used the $15 Sintech adapter. Amazon/ebay sells them. There's a short board and a long board; I used the short and it worked fine for me in a late 2013 rMBP.

Search for the180 page rMBP ssd thread on macrumors; it has great instructions. Different models have different physical constraints as to what will fit, how fast an NVMe (x2 vs x4) they can support, etc.

E.g: On the 2013-4 models you have sacrifice using hibernate, so battery life isn't as good unless you shut down.
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