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Leviton 20-Amp 125-Volt Extra Heavy Duty Hospital Grade Receptacle (Red) EXPIRED

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Amazon.com has Leviton 8300-R 20-Amp 125-Volt Extra Heavy Duty Hospital Grade Receptacle (Red) on sale for $1.99. Shipping is free. Thanks iconian

Note: Usually ships within 1 to 2 months
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Editor's Notes & Price Research

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Our research indicates that the Leviton 8300-R 20-Amp 125-Volt Extra Heavy Duty Hospital Grade Receptacle (Red) is $3.96 lower (66.5% savings) than the next best available price from a reputable merchant with prices starting from $5.95.

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Edited May 19, 2019 at 04:01 PM by
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Featured Comments

It is a special isolated ground type and must be wired as a 20A with 12ga wire vs the normal 14ga in many homes.
27 Helpful?
Theoretically, you are correct. A green light could also mean stop on a stop light, but everyone is used to seeing green and it meaning go on a stop light.

For similar reasons, a 20A outlet must be on a circuit that can supply 20A. Someone sees a 20A outlet and should be able to assume they can get 20A from it without tripping the breaker. It's what the National Electrical Code (NFPA-70) requires.
----
Edit: For anyone doing a thumbs down, feel free to submit an amendment to table 210-21(b)(3) of the NEC for inclusion in the next revision.
25 Helpful?
Red plugs, 2700k "warm" lights, velvet curtains, and a heart-shaped bed. The whorehouse look is complete! woot
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#3
Yay, finally some hope my health insurance premium will drop!
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#4
Still waiting for a Thor grade receptacle. Joking aside, only the red one is on sale at $2. You may need to spray paint it.
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#5
It is a special isolated ground type and must be wired as a 20A with 12ga wire vs the normal 14ga in many homes.
Reply Helpful Comment? 29 2
Last edited by 10Gauge May 19, 2019 at 04:11 PM.
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#6
For those who actually get these, you can Get some matching 2-gang covers for $1.24...
https://www.amazon.com/Leviton-80...7T29TY0F66
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#7
Finally...for my Homebrew hospital.
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Thanks OP!! In 4 3
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#9
Red plugs, 2700k "warm" lights, velvet curtains, and a heart-shaped bed. The whorehouse look is complete! woot
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#10
Quote from 10Gauge
:
It is a special isolated ground type and must be wired as a 20A with 12ga wire vs the normal 14ga in many homes.
Love that you're making this comment with that profile name =^,^=

But, yes, don't buy 20 amp outlets unless you know what you're doing and that they belong on the circuit they're being placed on: otherwise you will be out of code. "Upgrading your breaker" will not solve this: you have to have adequate wiring on that circuit (switching out breakers without low enough gauge wiring is a really bad idea). Ideally the only way this will affect you is when you try to sell your house, but there are reasons for electrical code being this way.

FYI, these are "self-grounded". That does not mean they are magic devices that don't require a ground path. All it means is that you can technically ground it to the outlet box it's in, IF you're using a metal box, and IF the box is already grounded. You still have to have a ground wire coming to the box (using the ground screw), or conduit that makes a clear path to ground.

From an average home owner perspective, there's nothing special here (unless you like the red color): they're essentially just regular 20 amp outlets, which many people can't even use, since they don't have any 20 amp circuits.
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#11
Quote from 10Gauge
:
It is a special isolated ground type and must be wired as a 20A with 12ga wire vs the normal 14ga in many homes.
What is the reason for having to use 12ga 20A? I see that we can simply use 14ga 15A wiring with this receptacle, as long as the breaker is also 15A, we should be safe, no? Anything plugged in that exceeds 15A, the breaker trips and keeps us safe, right?
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#12
Drat. Just installed normal white ones in my new shop. Red would have been quite awesome.
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#13
Quote from spydersdeals69
:
Red plugs, 2700k "warm" lights, velvet curtains, and a heart-shaped bed. The whorehouse look is complete! woot
OR .... add a "Steel 💃🏻 pole" in the middle of the hall and a new business is established!
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#14
Quote from 10Gauge
:
It is a special isolated ground type and must be wired as a 20A with 12ga wire vs the normal 14ga in many homes.
A lot of homes also have a combination of 15, and 20 amp breakers (14g and 12g wire for those not dealing with this stuff daily.

Also, what's the reasoning on only 12g wire for this unit vs 14? Is it by design (14 is too small to lock?) I can't really think of a reason so just asking.
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#15
Quote from blahbleh
:
What is the reason for having to use 12ga 20A? I see that we can simply use 14ga 15A wiring with this receptacle, as long as the breaker is also 15A, we should be safe, no? Anything plugged in that exceeds 15A, the breaker trips and keeps us safe, right?
Theoretically, you are correct. A green light could also mean stop on a stop light, but everyone is used to seeing green and it meaning go on a stop light.

For similar reasons, a 20A outlet must be on a circuit that can supply 20A. Someone sees a 20A outlet and should be able to assume they can get 20A from it without tripping the breaker. It's what the National Electrical Code (NFPA-70) requires.
----
Edit: For anyone doing a thumbs down, feel free to submit an amendment to table 210-21(b)(3) of the NEC for inclusion in the next revision.
Reply Helpful Comment? 27 2
Last edited by statueim May 19, 2019 at 05:18 PM.
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