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Cabinets Savior (Original Steam Release Accessory for Instant Pot or Pressure Cooker) 360 Degree Rotation Design $5.49 + Free Shipping

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OKP has Cabinets Savior [okp.com] (Original Steam Release Accessory for Instant Pot or Pressure Cooker) 360 Degree Rotation Design for $5.49.

Shipping is free

360 degrees rotation design: you can adjust the steam pipe to emit the steam in any direction.
Never leak or lean forward: unique structure makes this accessory fits the steam release handle snuggly.
Healthy and safe: all parts are made from food grade silicone, BPA-free and high-temperature resistance.
Compatible with more models: All Duo, Smart and Ultra models of Mini, 5qt ,6qt or 8qt size will be well fitted.


Attention Please:

This steam diverter is designed for Instapot electric pressure cooker. If you want to use it on other pressure cookers, please check your knob size or consult us before your purchase.
Please make sure the vent encase the ENTIRE knob.
Put your knob to the SEALING position.
Make sure your steam valve is sitting flat after putting this accessory on.
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Created 05-20-2019 at 11:22 AM by f12_26
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Joined Feb 2010
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#46
Quote from lilgrubbybaby
:
You pretty clearly misinterpreted what he said. 'Spitting up' is not the same as steam exiting the cooker.
So this accessory is only for those that have issues with their pressure cooker "spitting up" (not releasing steam)? No, this is for directing the steam so it doesn't go up onto the cabinets and damage the finish of the cabinets. I don't think he is referring to "spitting up" as shooting liquid out of the spout and it he is, I'm not sure how that has anything to do with this accessory and its intended use.
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#47
I just put my hand over the release valve, it gets a little warm but it's not a big deal
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#48
Quote from lilgrubbybaby
:
I very much do. So what other than steam do you think is coming out of that thing?
Just to be clear, when we're talking about "steam", we're speaking (in general) about liquids heated to their boiling points, and undergoing a phase transition to a gaseous state...right?

So if we're just talking about "vaporized water", then my question is:

Are you simply adding tap water to an empty pot and pressure cooking it, on its own? Because tap water contains many ppm of total dissolved solids, both organic and inorganic (check your local water quality reports). While the boiling point differs from compound to compound, and the boiling point of a particular mixture will change depending on its composition, it's generally safe to say that your "steam" in this circumstance contains a broad mix of "crap" from your local municipal water supply.

If you began with RO/DI water, then ideally you're releasing pretty much just vaporized h2o in that "steam".

Cool. Now lets think about this for a second. What happens if you put something...else...in with the water? Say, I don't know...lets talk something wacky like...chicken...for instance.

What do you think is in your "steam" now?

Jawdrop

I know, right? LMAO
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#49
I place my steam vent away from the cabinets... Problem solved for free?
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#50
Quote from ADoobie
:
Just to be clear, when we're talking about "steam", we're speaking (in general) about liquids heated to their boiling points, and undergoing a phase transition to a gaseous state...right?

So if we're just talking about "vaporized water", then my question is:

Are you simply adding tap water to an empty pot and pressure cooking it, on its own? Because tap water contains many ppm of total dissolved solids, both organic and inorganic (check your local water quality reports). While the boiling point differs from compound to compound, and the boiling point of a particular mixture will change depending on its composition, it's generally safe to say that your "steam" in this circumstance contains a broad mix of "crap" from your local municipal water supply.

If you began with RO/DI water, then ideally you're releasing pretty much just vaporized h2o in that "steam".

Cool. Now lets think about this for a second. What happens if you put something...else...in with the water? Say, I don't know...lets talk something wacky like...chicken...for instance.

What do you think is in your "steam" now?

https://static.slickdealscdn.com/ima...s2/jawdrop.gif

I know, right? https://static.slickdealscdn.com/ima.../emot-LMAO.gif
Dude boiling water and collecting steam is one of the oldest ways of purifying it. There's nothing in steam but water. You could boil chicken broth, collect and condense the steam, and it'd be pure water.

You don't know what you're talking about in the least.
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Last edited by lilgrubbybaby May 21, 2019 at 02:12 PM.
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#51
I usually buy a 40 of Colt 45 when I want to blow off steam.
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#52
We tried Pho using 8 qt Instant Pot and wow that thing spewed broth everywhere. Since then we remember to use a towel when quick releasing
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#53
Quote from K7S5A
:
We tried Pho using 8 qt Instant Pot and wow that thing spewed broth everywhere. Since then we remember to use a towel when quick releasing
You probably filled it up beyond the max line. I only get issues with spit up when I get overzealous with my liquids.
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#54
Quote from toando
:
You probably filled it up beyond the max line. I only get issues with spit up when I get overzealous with my liquids.
Stayed at max line, still a problem
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#55
Quote from lilgrubbybaby
:
I very much do. So what other than steam do you think is coming out of that thing?
Mine smells like whatever I'm cooking in it... fills my kitchen with the smell of pot roast or whatever. That's what's in the steam... THAT'S the smell that sticks to the inside of your pot and will stick to the inside of this silicone.
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#56
Quote from K7S5A
:
Stayed at max line, still a problem
That stinks. I've found it helpful to do a 'partial' full release. As in, not pushing the knob all the way back, but just enough for it to start releasing steam and let it sit there slightly open instead.

On another note, I'm not sure if you're Vietnamese or not, but this is a product my parents (and obviously now me) live and die by for making quick Pho. don't mind the eBay link, I just quickly googled it. I usually pick it up for the same price at my local Chinese store.

https://www.ebay.com/p/Quoc-Viet-...5?thm=1000

Add that with an onion, jicama, charred beef bone and some star anis and you'll be rockin'.
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#57
Quote from lilgrubbybaby
:
Dude boiling water and collecting steam is one of the oldest ways of purifying it. There's nothing in steam but water. You could boil chicken broth, collect and condense the steam, and it'd be pure water.

You don't know what you're talking about in the least.
Sorry friend, you're incorrect. I'm a distiller. Boiling and separating compounds from each other, by creating steam, is literally what I do for a living. LMAO

That being said, I'll be nice and help you understand this a little better.

Water boils at 100c. Ethanol boils at around 78.37c (lower than water).

Now if you have some ethanol in your water, and you boil it, is the steam you collect "just water"? No. It's ethanol and water. In fact, you'll have a higher concentration of ethanol in the steam in the early stages than you will h2o. Case in point: any compound with a lower boiling point than water, will in fact boil out WITH the water and be present in the steam. In addition, compounds with higher boiling points will ALSO boil out, unless the heat applied is no greater than the boiling point of water at the given pressure (100c). Even then, as things are mixed together, some of the "higher boiling points than water" will in fact "latch on" to the h2o molecules and get brought along for the steam ride. While the temperature of water cannot exceed 100c at atmosphere, it can indeed do so under pressure, which is exactly what happens in a pressure cooker.

While pressure raises the boiling point of water, yes, it is true that the boiling point is raised for everything else as well. So you're not changing the scale that much, and heavier compounds with higher boiling points still aren't likely to escape in the steam. But that's not what I'm really talking about:

Have you ever smelled chicken? What is the compound that causes the "smell"? "Smells" or "aromas" are odor compounds, and I've linked to a healthy list of them for you below. Regardless, the original comment was that "steam" causes "smells" and you're being pretty snarky in your claims that you're the only one who could possibly know what you're talking about. So pay attention here, because it's entirely possible that you're just wrong bubs.

Aroma compounds have very low boiling points and are very volatile; ergo FOODS that are being cooked in a PRESSURE COOKER will release their odor compounds (aromas) in the STEAM escaping the cooker. Try cooking shrimp in the kitchen and telling me that the steam doesn't smell like seafood. Trap that in something for a while with chicken, beef, some stanky veggies, and let it sit for a week.

The original poster was correct. You were incorrect. My reply was correct. Your rebuttal was just ignorant - and still incorrect.

Cheers mate.

PS you can find that table here:
https://www.thoughtco.com/aroma-c...ds-4142268
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#58
Can I use this to steam my lattes? Asking for a friend.
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#59
Cabinet Saver, Face Melter
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#60
I just throw a thick towel, or folded towel over the instant pot and move it slightly away from my cabinet. Save your money and possible face from injury.
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