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Graco Magnum 257025 Project Painter Plus Paint Sprayer EXPIRED

$184
$269.00
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Amazon has Graco Magnum 257025 Project Painter Plus Paint Sprayer on sale for $183.59. Shipping is free. Thanks tehmark

Note, temporarily out of stock from Amazon but may still be purchased and ships when available.

Home Depot also has Graco Magnum 257025 Project Painter Plus Paint Sprayer on sale for $183.59. Shipping is free or select in-store pickup where available.

Note: This item is backordered and expected to ship May 30.
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  • Our research indicates that the price of this Graco Magnum 257025 Project Painter Plus Paint Sprayer is $55.41 lower (23% savings) than the next best available price from a reputable merchant with prices starting at $239 at the time of this posting.
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Edited May 25, 2019 at 08:10 PM by
Graco Magnum 257025 Project Painter Plus Paint Sprayer $183.59

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product...UTF8&psc=1 - Now temporarily out of stock, but still available for purchase.

Last on sale the 14th of this month, but I missed that deal. Same deal. This usually floats around $230. Bought one to paint the house, ugh.Crying2
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I did a lot of research yesterday figuring out what I needed.

Basically the biggest downside to these is extreme lack of control compared to a HVLP. This is more about getting a lot of paint on as quick as possible. The upside to this is it can accept latex straight from the can without thinning it out. The downside is if you have things like furniture where you need to get inside it (ie shelving) and you cant make fast swoops, you have a high chance of overspray which of course is really bad.

HVLP on the otherhand has extreme control. If you want to be really careful to not put on too much spray and you want to take your time, you absolutely can, you go at your own pace vs being forced to make fast sweeps. The downside is that unless you buy a high end one ($800+ typically), you'll have to thin latex paint out, sometimes a lot.. like at the max limit or beyond and you're adding water to achieve that which is less than ideal. You also have to premix every single time. But there are non-latex paints that're easy to buy anywhere and even hybrid paints that'll allow you to spray straight up or maybe thin it out a bit but not much. The result is a factory finish on virtually anything you can think of from desk legs to cabinets. The difference is extreme (ultra smooth finish, can have professional enamel look too from a $400 machine if done right) but so is the price and the time it takes to prep.

My question with these airless sprayers was - if it boils down to mostly flat'ish surfaces or just nothing with a great deal of obstacles, taking into consideration how long it takes to tape everything off (prep work time goes way up with these indoors especially) plus the cleanup of the actual tool itself and the cost of that money going into something else (most of us have endless wants/needs and hopefully a smart fiscal budget) ... is it really worth it? Do I paint my own house? No. Do I like tons of prep work? Hell no. Do I like cleanup? No! Do I like buying things I don't really need: nod For me, as a woodworking.. I need to tell myself no, don't do it! (But I might anyways >Smilie ) But for you guys, if you have a lot of things you want to paint.. you can take doors outside and spray them super fast and super smooth, same with cabinets (make sure you add certain agents to allow for a smoother finish) and if you do paint your own house.. then hell yeah, rolling paint is easy but this is even faster.

Anyways those were my thoughts, thought I'd share to maybe help someone out because at first it is a bit confusing. I think even getting this + a $400'ish HVLP separate is still cheaper than a combo of the two in a single high end HVLP as HVLP's seem to be rising in cost (tarrifs maybe, 25% increase on the ones I was looking at according to camel). And btw if you're just looking for an airless spray period, you know what they can/cant do.. well obviously this is a really great option. Thousands have left reviews across the web on these and the vast majority of those reviews are very positive!

Edit: I know airless sprayers aren't meant for furniture, that was part of my point. Originally prior to my research I thought they could. Smilie
56 Helpful?
You would never use this to paint furniture. It's made for painting walls. Just like you would never use HVLP for a wall. They are both completely different use cases. I'm sure you technically "could" do it. Airless sprayers also require backrolling. One person sprays while one person uses a roller after the spray. HVLP is a nice smooth finish and obviously no back rolling. As to if it's worth the clean up and cost... hell yes, if time is important to you. Also, and like the case of my house, I have highly textured stucco. It's a nightmare to roll out. Must be sprayed.

Who uses latex on cabinetry and furniture? That wouldn't be very durable IMO. A nice oil based thru an HVLP is the way to go.

I used to have a husky that did both HVLP and Airless.
10 Helpful?
Lowes does not allow coupon after price matched.
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#3
thanks
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#4
https://www.lowes.com/pd/Graco-Ma...er/3160175
So I checked this deal on Amazon and noticed this qualifies to be price matched by Lowes...then you should be able to purchase a coupon from eBay ($20 off $100). Making this a slicker deal. IMO.
$299 @ Lowes reg price.
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#5
Seems like a good deal for a graco. I have the harbor freight sprayer like this, think it was $160 ish.
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#6
This or the Graco electric hand held sprayer (#17M359) for $359?
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#7
I paid $163 for it, so $183 isn't too bad. I was almost ready to use it, then got a hail storm and insurance paid to have my house repainted ...
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#8
Quote from Easybuy55
:
https://www.lowes.com/pd/Graco-Ma...er/3160175
So I checked this deal on Amazon and noticed this qualifies to be price matched by Lowes...then you should be able to purchase a coupon from eBay ($20 off $100). Making this a slicker deal. IMO.
$299 @ Lowes reg price.
Lowes does not allow coupon after price matched.
Reply Helpful Comment? 6 0
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#9
I did a lot of research yesterday figuring out what I needed.

Basically the biggest downside to these is extreme lack of control compared to a HVLP. This is more about getting a lot of paint on as quick as possible. The upside to this is it can accept latex straight from the can without thinning it out. The downside is if you have things like furniture where you need to get inside it (ie shelving) and you cant make fast swoops, you have a high chance of overspray which of course is really bad.

HVLP on the otherhand has extreme control. If you want to be really careful to not put on too much spray and you want to take your time, you absolutely can, you go at your own pace vs being forced to make fast sweeps. The downside is that unless you buy a high end one ($800+ typically), you'll have to thin latex paint out, sometimes a lot.. like at the max limit or beyond and you're adding water to achieve that which is less than ideal. You also have to premix every single time. But there are non-latex paints that're easy to buy anywhere and even hybrid paints that'll allow you to spray straight up or maybe thin it out a bit but not much. The result is a factory finish on virtually anything you can think of from desk legs to cabinets. The difference is extreme (ultra smooth finish, can have professional enamel look too from a $400 machine if done right) but so is the price and the time it takes to prep.

My question with these airless sprayers was - if it boils down to mostly flat'ish surfaces or just nothing with a great deal of obstacles, taking into consideration how long it takes to tape everything off (prep work time goes way up with these indoors especially) plus the cleanup of the actual tool itself and the cost of that money going into something else (most of us have endless wants/needs and hopefully a smart fiscal budget) ... is it really worth it? Do I paint my own house? No. Do I like tons of prep work? Hell no. Do I like cleanup? No! Do I like buying things I don't really need: nod For me, as a woodworking.. I need to tell myself no, don't do it! (But I might anyways >Smilie ) But for you guys, if you have a lot of things you want to paint.. you can take doors outside and spray them super fast and super smooth, same with cabinets (make sure you add certain agents to allow for a smoother finish) and if you do paint your own house.. then hell yeah, rolling paint is easy but this is even faster.

Anyways those were my thoughts, thought I'd share to maybe help someone out because at first it is a bit confusing. I think even getting this + a $400'ish HVLP separate is still cheaper than a combo of the two in a single high end HVLP as HVLP's seem to be rising in cost (tarrifs maybe, 25% increase on the ones I was looking at according to camel). And btw if you're just looking for an airless spray period, you know what they can/cant do.. well obviously this is a really great option. Thousands have left reviews across the web on these and the vast majority of those reviews are very positive!

Edit: I know airless sprayers aren't meant for furniture, that was part of my point. Originally prior to my research I thought they could. Smilie
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Last edited by davelikesdeals2 May 23, 2019 at 06:36 AM.

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#10
Bought this for the same price last year and still haven't got around to using it... 🤷🏻 ♂️
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#11
Quote from davelikesdeals2
:
I did a lot of research yesterday figuring out what I needed.

Basically the biggest downside to these is extreme lack of control compared to a HVLP. This is more about getting a lot of paint on as quick as possible. The upside to this is it can accept latex straight from the can without thinning it out. The downside is if you have things like furniture where you need to get inside it (ie shelving) and you cant make fast swoops, you have a high chance of overspray which of course is really bad.

HVLP on the otherhand has extreme control. If you want to be really careful to not put on too much spray and you want to take your time, you absolutely can, you go at your own pace vs being forced to make fast sweeps. The downside is that unless you buy a high end one ($800+ typically), you'll have to thin latex paint out, sometimes a lot.. like at the max limit or beyond and you're adding water to achieve that which is less than idea. You also have to premix every single time. But there are non-latex paints that're easy to buy anywhere and even hybrid paints that'll allow you to spray straight up or maybe thin it out a bit but not much. The result is a factory finish on virtually anything you can think of from desk legs to cabinets. The difference is extreme (ultra smooth finish, can have professional enamel look too from a $400 machine if done right) but so is the price and the time it takes to prep.

My question with these airless sprayers was - if it boils down to mostly flat'ish surfaces or just nothing with a great deal of obstacles, taking into consideration how long it takes to tape everything off (prep work time goes way up with these indoors especially) plus the cleanup of the actual tool itself and the cost of that money going into something else (most of us have endless wants/needs and hopefully a smart fiscal budget) ... is it really worth it? Do I paint my own house? No. Do I like tons of prep work? Hell no. Do I like cleanup? No! Do I like buying things I don't really need: nod For me, as a woodworking.. I need to tell myself no, don't do it! (But I might anyways >Smilie ) But for you guys, if you have a lot of things you want to paint.. you can take doors outside and spray them super fast and super smooth, same with cabinets (make sure you add certain agents to allow for a smoother finish) and if you do paint your own house.. then hell yeah, rolling paint is easy but this is even faster.

Anyways those were my thoughts, thought I'd share to maybe help someone out because at first it is a bit confusing. I think even getting this + a $400'ish HVLP separate is still cheaper than a combo of the two in a single high end HVLP as HVLP's seem to be rising in cost (tarrifs maybe, 25% increase on the ones I was looking at according to camel). And btw if you're just looking for an airless spray period, you know what they can/cant do.. well obviously this is a really great option. Thousands have left reviews across the web on these and the vast majority of those reviews are very positive!
Good points, I struggle with this too. I like the idea but can't justify all the prep work versus using a roller.
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#12
Quote from davelikesdeals2
:
I did a lot of research yesterday figuring out what I needed.

Basically the biggest downside to these is extreme lack of control compared to a HVLP. This is more about getting a lot of paint on as quick as possible. The upside to this is it can accept latex straight from the can without thinning it out. The downside is if you have things like furniture where you need to get inside it (ie shelving) and you cant make fast swoops, you have a high chance of overspray which of course is really bad.

HVLP on the otherhand has extreme control. If you want to be really careful to not put on too much spray and you want to take your time, you absolutely can, you go at your own pace vs being forced to make fast sweeps. The downside is that unless you buy a high end one ($800+ typically), you'll have to thin latex paint out, sometimes a lot.. like at the max limit or beyond and you're adding water to achieve that which is less than idea. You also have to premix every single time. But there are non-latex paints that're easy to buy anywhere and even hybrid paints that'll allow you to spray straight up or maybe thin it out a bit but not much. The result is a factory finish on virtually anything you can think of from desk legs to cabinets. The difference is extreme (ultra smooth finish, can have professional enamel look too from a $400 machine if done right) but so is the price and the time it takes to prep.

My question with these airless sprayers was - if it boils down to mostly flat'ish surfaces or just nothing with a great deal of obstacles, taking into consideration how long it takes to tape everything off (prep work time goes way up with these indoors especially) plus the cleanup of the actual tool itself and the cost of that money going into something else (most of us have endless wants/needs and hopefully a smart fiscal budget) ... is it really worth it? Do I paint my own house? No. Do I like tons of prep work? Hell no. Do I like cleanup? No! Do I like buying things I don't really need: nod For me, as a woodworking.. I need to tell myself no, don't do it! (But I might anyways >Smilie ) But for you guys, if you have a lot of things you want to paint.. you can take doors outside and spray them super fast and super smooth, same with cabinets (make sure you add certain agents to allow for a smoother finish) and if you do paint your own house.. then hell yeah, rolling paint is easy but this is even faster.

Anyways those were my thoughts, thought I'd share to maybe help someone out because at first it is a bit confusing. I think even getting this + a $400'ish HVLP separate is still cheaper than a combo of the two in a single high end HVLP as HVLP's seem to be rising in cost (tarrifs maybe, 25% increase on the ones I was looking at according to camel). And btw if you're just looking for an airless spray period, you know what they can/cant do.. well obviously this is a really great option. Thousands have left reviews across the web on these and the vast majority of those reviews are very positive!
You would never use this to paint furniture. It's made for painting walls. Just like you would never use HVLP for a wall. They are both completely different use cases. I'm sure you technically "could" do it. Airless sprayers also require backrolling. One person sprays while one person uses a roller after the spray. HVLP is a nice smooth finish and obviously no back rolling. As to if it's worth the clean up and cost... hell yes, if time is important to you. Also, and like the case of my house, I have highly textured stucco. It's a nightmare to roll out. Must be sprayed.

Who uses latex on cabinetry and furniture? That wouldn't be very durable IMO. A nice oil based thru an HVLP is the way to go.

I used to have a husky that did both HVLP and Airless.
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Last edited by adambnyc May 23, 2019 at 06:35 AM.
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#13
Quote from Lefty421
:
This or the Graco electric hand held sprayer (#17M359) for $359?
Depends upon your needs... I have both. For smaller jobs, I use the handheld, for larger jobs I use this. Remember you have to refill the paint more often with the handheld, and it gets heavy when holding it for long periods of time.
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#14
Quote from adambnyc
:
You would never use this to paint furniture. It's made for painting walls. Just like you would never use HVLP for a wall. They are both completely different use cases. I'm sure you technically "could" do it. Airless sprayers also require backrolling. One person sprays while one person uses a roller after the spray. HVLP is a nice smooth finish and obviously no back rolling. As to if it's worth the clean up and cost... hell yes, if time is important to you. Also, and like the case of my house, I have highly textured stucco. It's a nightmare to roll out. Must be sprayed.
This actually can work quite well to paint furniture - it's a bit of overkill, but it will work just fine. In fact, I used one to paint a table just last week.
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#15
Quote from davelikesdeals2
:
I did a lot of research yesterday figuring out what I needed.

Basically the biggest downside to these is extreme lack of control compared to a HVLP. This is more about getting a lot of paint on as quick as possible. The upside to this is it can accept latex straight from the can without thinning it out. The downside is if you have things like furniture where you need to get inside it (ie shelving) and you cant make fast swoops, you have a high chance of overspray which of course is really bad.

HVLP on the otherhand has extreme control. If you want to be really careful to not put on too much spray and you want to take your time, you absolutely can, you go at your own pace vs being forced to make fast sweeps. The downside is that unless you buy a high end one ($800+ typically), you'll have to thin latex paint out, sometimes a lot.. like at the max limit or beyond and you're adding water to achieve that which is less than idea. You also have to premix every single time. But there are non-latex paints that're easy to buy anywhere and even hybrid paints that'll allow you to spray straight up or maybe thin it out a bit but not much. The result is a factory finish on virtually anything you can think of from desk legs to cabinets. The difference is extreme (ultra smooth finish, can have professional enamel look too from a $400 machine if done right) but so is the price and the time it takes to prep.

My question with these airless sprayers was - if it boils down to mostly flat'ish surfaces or just nothing with a great deal of obstacles, taking into consideration how long it takes to tape everything off (prep work time goes way up with these indoors especially) plus the cleanup of the actual tool itself and the cost of that money going into something else (most of us have endless wants/needs and hopefully a smart fiscal budget) ... is it really worth it? Do I paint my own house? No. Do I like tons of prep work? Hell no. Do I like cleanup? No! Do I like buying things I don't really need: nod For me, as a woodworking.. I need to tell myself no, don't do it! (But I might anyways >Smilie ) But for you guys, if you have a lot of things you want to paint.. you can take doors outside and spray them super fast and super smooth, same with cabinets (make sure you add certain agents to allow for a smoother finish) and if you do paint your own house.. then hell yeah, rolling paint is easy but this is even faster.

Anyways those were my thoughts, thought I'd share to maybe help someone out because at first it is a bit confusing. I think even getting this + a $400'ish HVLP separate is still cheaper than a combo of the two in a single high end HVLP as HVLP's seem to be rising in cost (tarrifs maybe, 25% increase on the ones I was looking at according to camel). And btw if you're just looking for an airless spray period, you know what they can/cant do.. well obviously this is a really great option. Thousands have left reviews across the web on these and the vast majority of those reviews are very positive!
You have much more control with the fine finish tips with less overspray. But to use these tips you will need to purchase a separate spray gun.

I have one of these and it's great for large projects. Purchased initially to paint the ceiling and walls in my basement and I was very satisfied with the results. Easy to clean with the hose attachment but cleaning the spray gun properly takes some time. You will need a gallon of paint at minimum so may not be what you're looking for for very small projects. I have put about 20 gallons of paint and primer through it over the past couple of years and it has held up well.
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