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  • Description: "The winner of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, as well as seven other awards. The Sympathizer is a sweeping epic of love and betrayal. The narrator, a communist double agent, is a "man of two minds," a half-French, half-Vietnamese army captain who arranges to come to America after the Fall of Saigon, and while building a new life with other Vietnamese refugees in Los Angeles is secretly reporting back to his communist superiors in Vietnam. The Sympathizer is a blistering exploration of identity and America, a gripping espionage novel, and a powerful story of love and friendship."
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Edited July 11, 2019 at 08:31 AM by
Amazon has the eBook edition of The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen for $1.99.


4.1 stars in 2,092 reviews


https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00PSSG4MM [amazon.com]


The winner of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, as well as seven other awards, The Sympathizer is the breakthrough novel of the year. With the pace and suspense of a thriller and prose that has been compared to Graham Greene and Saul Bellow, The Sympathizer is a sweeping epic of love and betrayal. The narrator, a communist double agent, is a "man of two minds," a half-French, half-Vietnamese army captain who arranges to come to America after the Fall of Saigon, and while building a new life with other Vietnamese refugees in Los Angeles is secretly reporting back to his communist superiors in Vietnam. The Sympathizer is a blistering exploration of identity and America, a gripping espionage novel, and a powerful story of love and friendship.


Winner of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction
Winner of the 2016 Edgar Award for Best First Novel
Winner of the 2016 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction
Winner of the 2016 Dayton Literary Peace Prize for Fiction
Winner of the 2015 Center for Fiction First Novel Prize
Winner of the 2015-2016 Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature (Adult Fiction)
Winner of the 2016 California Book Award for First Fiction
Winner of the 2017 Association for Asian American Studies Award for Best Book in Creative Writing (Prose)
Finalist for the 2016 PEN/Faulkner Award
Finalist for the 2016 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction
Finalist for the 2016 Medici Book Club Prize
Finalist for the 2015 Los Angeles Times Book Prize (Mystery/Thriller)
Finalist for the 2016 ABA Indies Choice/E.B. White Read-Aloud Award (Book of the Year, Adult Fiction)
Shortlisted for the 2017 International Dublin Literary Award
Named a Best Book of the Year on more than twenty lists, including the New York Times Book Review, Wall Street Journal, and Washington Post


"A layered immigrant tale told in the wry, confessional voice of a 'man of two minds'—and two countries, Vietnam and the United States."—Pulitzer Prize Citation

"[A] remarkable debut novel . . . [Nguyen] brings a distinctive perspective to the war and its aftermath. His book fills a void in the literature, giving voice to the previously voiceless . . . The nameless protagonist-narrator, a memorable character despite his anonymity, is an Americanized Vietnamese with a divided heart and mind. Nguyen's skill in portraying this sort of ambivalent personality compares favorably with masters like Conrad, Greene, and le Carré. . . . Both thriller and social satire. . . . In its final chapters, The Sympathizer becomes an absurdist tour de force that might have been written by a Kafka or Genet."—Philip Caputo, New York Times Book Review (cover review)

"This is more than a fresh perspective on a familiar subject. [The Sympathizer] is intelligent, relentlessly paced and savagely funny . . . The voice of the double-agent narrator, caustic yet disarmingly honest, etches itself on the memory."Wall Street Journal (WSJ's Best Books of 2015)

"Nguyen doesn't shy away from how traumatic the Vietnam War was for everyone involved. Nor does he pass judgment about where his narrator's loyalties should lie. Most war stories are clear about which side you should root for―The Sympathizer doesn't let the reader off the hook so easily . . . Despite how dark it is, The Sympathizer is still a fast-paced, entertaining read . . . a much-needed Vietnamese perspective on the war."―Bill Gates, Gates Notes

"Extraordinary . . . Surely a new classic of war fiction. . . . [Nguyen] has wrapped a cerebral thriller around a desperate expat story that confronts the existential dilemmas of our age. . . . Laced with insight on the ways nonwhite people are rendered invisible in the propaganda that passes for our pop culture. . . . I haven't read anything since Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four that illustrates so palpably how a patient tyrant, unmoored from all humane constraint, can reduce a man's mind to liquid."Washington Post

"The great achievement of The Sympathizer is that it gives the Vietnamese a voice and demands that we pay attention. Until now, it's been largely a one-sided conversation—or at least that's how it seems in American popular culture . . . We've never had a story quite like this one before. . . . [Nguyen] has a great deal to say and a knowing, playful, deeply intelligent voice . . . There are so many passages to admire. Mr. Nguyen is a master of the telling ironic phrase and the biting detail, and the book pulses with Catch-22-style absurdities."New York Times

"Beautifully written and meaty . . . really compelling. I had that kid-like feeling of being inside the book."—Claire Messud, Boston Globe

"Thrilling in its virtuosity, as in its masterly exploitation of the espionage-thriller genre, The Sympathizer was awarded the Pulitzer Prize, and has come to be considered one of the greatest of Vietnam War novels . . . The book's (unnamed) narrator speaks in an audaciously postmodernist voice, echoing not only Vladimir Nabokov and Ralph Ellison but the Dostoyevsky of Notes from the Underground."―Joyce Carol Oates, New Yorker

"Gleaming and uproarious, a dark comedy of confession filled with charlatans, delusionists and shameless opportunists . . . The Sympathizer, like Graham Greene's The Quiet American, examines American intentions, often mixed with hubris, benevolence and ineptitude, that lead the country into conflict."Los Angeles Times

"Both a riveting spy novel and a study in identity."Entertainment Weekly

"This debut is a page-turner (read: everybody will finish) that makes you reconsider the Vietnam War (read: everyone will have an opinion) . . . Nguyen's darkly comic novel offers a point of view about American culture that we've rarely seen."—Oprah.com (Oprah's Book Club Suggestions)

"The novel's best parts are painful, hilarious exposures of white tone-deafness . . . [the] satire is delicious."New Yorker

"The Sympathizer reads as part literary historical fiction, part espionage thriller and part satire. American perceptions of Asians serve as some of the book's most deliciously tart commentary . . . Nguyen knows of what he writes."Los Angeles Times

"Sparkling and audacious . . . Unique and startling . . . Nguyen's prose is often like a feverish, frenzied dream, a profuse and lively stream of images sparking off the page. . . . Nguyen can be wickedly funny. . . . [His] narrator has an incisive take on Asian-American history and what it means to be a nonwhite American. . . . this remarkable, rollicking read by a Vietnamese immigrant heralds an exciting new voice in American literature."Seattle Times

"Stunned, amazed, impressed. [The Sympathizer is] so skillfully and brilliantly executed that I cannot believe this is a first novel. (I should add jealous to my emotions.) Upends our notions of the Vietnam novel."Chicago Tribune

"A very special, important, brilliant novel . . . Amazing . . . I don't say brilliant about a lot of books, but this is a brilliant book . . . A fabulous book . . . that everyone should read."—Nancy Pearl, KUOW.org

"Dazzling . . . I've read scads of Vietnam War books, but The Sympathizer has an exciting quality I haven't encountered . . . A fascinating exploration of personal identity, cultural identity, and what it means to sympathize with two sides at once."—John Powers, Fresh Air, NPR (Books I Wish I'd Reviewed)

"Powerful and evocative . . . Gripping."San Francisco Chronicle

"Welcome a unique new voice to the literary chorus. . . . [The Sympathizer] is, among other things, a character-driven thriller, a political satire, and a biting historical account of colonization and revolution. It dazzles on all fronts."Cleveland Plain Dealer

"[Nguyen's] books perform an optic tilt about Vietnam and what America did there as profound as Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man and Toni Morrison's Belovedwere to the legacy of racism and slavery."—John Freeman, Literary Hub

"For those who have been waiting for the great Vietnamese American Vietnam War novel, this is it. More to the point: This is a great American Vietnam War novel. . . . It is the last word (I hope) on the horrors of the Vietnamese re-education camps that our allies were sentenced to when we left them swinging in the wind."Vietnam Veterans of America

"What a story . . . [An] absorbing, elegantly written book . . . If you are an American, of any culture or color, you will benefit from reading this book which offers, in exquisite thought and phrase, the multi-layered experience of a war most Americans have blotted out of consciousness, suppressed, or willfully ignored. I've been waiting to read this book for decades."―Alice Walker, author of The Color Purple

"Magisterial. A disturbing, fascinating and darkly comic take on the fall of Saigon and its aftermath, and a powerful examination of guilt and betrayal. The Sympathizer is destined to become a classic and redefine the way we think about the Vietnam War and what it means to win and to lose."—T.C. Boyle

"Trapped in endless civil war, 'the man who has two minds' tortures and is tortured as he tries to meld the halves of his country and of himself. Viet Thanh Nguyen accomplishes this integration in a magnificent feat of storytelling. The Sympathizer is a novel of literary, historical, and political importance."—Maxine Hong Kingston, author of The Fifth Book of Peace

"It is a strong, strange and liberating joy to read this book, feeling with each page that a broken world is being knitted back together, once again whole and complete. As far as I am concerned, Viet Thanh Nguyen's The Sympathizer—both a great American novel and a great Vietnamese novel—will close the shelf on the literature of the Vietnam War."—Bob Shacochis, author of The Woman Who Lost Her Soul

"Read this novel with care; it is easy to read, wry, ironic, wise, and captivating, but it could change not only your outlook on the Vietnam War, but your outlook on what you believe about politics and ideology in general. It does what the best of literature does, expands your consciousness beyond the limitations of your body and individual circumstances."—Karl Marlantes, author of Matterhorn and What It Is Like to Go to War

"Not only does Viet Thanh Nguyen bring a rare and authentic voice to the body of American literature generated by the Vietnam War, he has created a book that transcends history and politics and nationality and speaks to the enduring theme of literature: the universal quest for self, for identity. The Sympathizeris a stellar debut by a writer of depth and skill."—Robert Olen Butler, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain

"The Sympathizer is a remarkable and brilliant book. By turns harrowing, and cut through by shards of unexpected and telling humor, this novel gives us the conflict in Vietnam, and its aftermath, in a way that is deeply truthful, and vitally important."—Vincent Lam, author of Bloodletting and Miraculous Cures and The Headmaster's Wager

"I think I'd have to go all the way back to Nabokov's Humbert Humbert to find the last narrative voice that so completely conked me over the head and took me prisoner. Nguyen and his unnamed protagonist certainly have made a name for themselves with one of the smartest, darkest, funniest books you'll read this year."—David Abrams, author of Fobbit

"Audaciously and vividly imagined. A compelling read."—Andrew X. Pham, author of Catfish and Mandala

"Nguyen's cross-grained protagonist exposes the hidden costs in both countries of America's tragic Asian misadventure. Nguyen's probing literary art illuminates how Americans failed in their political and military attempt to remake Vietnam—but then succeeded spectacularly in shrouding their failure in Hollywood distortions. Compelling—and profoundly unsettling."Booklist (starred review)

"A closely written novel of after-the-war Vietnam, when all that was solid melted into air. As Graham Greene and Robert Stone have taught us, on the streets of Saigon, nothing is as it seems. . . . Think Alan Furst meets Elmore Leonard, and you'll capture Nguyen at his most surreal . . . Both chilling and funny, and a worthy addition to the library of first-rate novels about the Vietnam War."—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

"[An] astonishing first novel . . . Nguyen's novel enlivens debate about history and human nature, and his narrator has a poignant often mindful voice."—Publishers Weekly (starred, boxed review)

"Breathtakingly cynical, the novel has its hilarious moments . . . Ultimately a meditation on war, political movements, America's imperialist role, the CIA, torture, loyalty, and one's personal identity, this is a powerful, thought-provoking work. It's hard to believe this effort . . . is a debut. This is right up there with Denis Johnson's Tree of Smoke."—Library Journal (starred review)

"I cannot remember the last time I read a novel whose protagonist I liked so much. Smart, funny, and self-critical, with a keen sense of when to let a story speak for itself (and when to gloss it with commentary). He's someone I would like to have a beer with, despite the fact that his life's work is the betrayal of his friends. . . . [Nguyen] proves a gifted and bold satirist."Barnes & Noble Review

"Riveting . . . The Sympathizer is not only a masterly espionage novel, but also a seminal work of 21st century American fiction. Giving voice to the Vietnamese experience in the United States, Nguyen offers profound insights into the legacy of war and the politically and racially charged atmosphere of the 1970s."—BookReporter

"[A] shimmering debut novel . . . Leaping with lyrical verve, each page turns to a unique and hauntingly familiar voice that refuses to let us forget what people are capable of doing to each other."—Asian American Writers' Workshop

"Arresting . . . One of the best pieces of fiction about the Vietnam war—and by a Vietnamese. . . . Stunning . . . Could it be that Nguyen has captured the shape of the devolution of war itself, from grand ambition to human ruin? . . . One of the finest novels of the Vietnam War published in recent years."—The Daily Beast

"[An] intriguing confessional . . . [a] tour de force . . . So taken was I by the first quarter of the book that I believed myself to be reading an actual confession . . . The character himself . . . and the quality of the narration seized me, leaving me almost breathless in my pursuit of an ending."Sewanee Review

"Tremendously funny, with a demanding verbal texture . . . Both tender and a bit of a romp, the book reminded me of how big books can be."Guardian(Best Books of 2015)

"Astounding . . . [The unnamed narrator] will be compared to the morally exhausted spies, intelligence officers and double agents of Joseph Conrad, Graham Greene, and John le Carré."Toronto Star
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Featured Comments

This book is actually really good. This author writes like every sentence in a paragraph is poetry (the accessible poems by a simpleton like me, at least). The illustration of the narrator's thoughts and experience is very vivid.

This book is about a Vietnamese-American immigrant following the Vietnam war. He's half french, for those who are turned off by a non-Caucasian character. It's fictional, but almost every detail is true to detail of what an individual of this population went through. This book is not a sob story. It doesn't try to make immigrants look heroic. It does not try to convey a political message as a "moral of the story." Rather, it is about a intellectual's experience of the events as the story unravels.

A specific example that resonated with me was when the character reflected on the Vietnamese prostitutes during the collapse of Saigon. As I went through that passage, I went from judging the prostitutes, to understanding them, to sympathizing them, to being proud of them, and then learning how their prostitution is part of a cycle related to the political actions in Vietnam by foreign interests. That is why I like the book so much, because it is not about pushing an agenda on you but rather a reflection on how things are.

I don't think there is any novel like this out there. For its uniqueness and skill of the author, I recommend it. I went through this book via Audible. The performer was "Jules Pierre Mao" from the Expanse scifi show, so that was a treat.

Lastly, my 2 cents. I want to note that people have a tendency to politicized everything and not let their ignorance get in the way of that goal. "N8_dog" is a perfect example of this, already accusing the book of being leftist but not even bothering to learn more about it. It is refreshing because this book is the opposite of this common 2019 American Plebeian tendency. I think it is a good example of how we (the educated people) should reflect on any current issues.
26 Helpful?
Then why are you on here commenting? Just to troll?
16 Helpful?
I bet you read and liked The Art of The Deal though , amirite?
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07-11-2019 at 08:25 AM
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#4
One of my professors assigned this as class reading without reading it first. Apparently there is a part where someone becomes intimate with a squid. I didn't read it myself but it made for a hilarious class when people had to discuss that portion haha.
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#5
Worth a couple of shipping credits. If just for the squid part.
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#6
Quote from nathan.salat
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When a book is a leftist pulitzer winner and when leftist critics shovel acclaim i know the book is not for me.
Then why are you on here commenting? Just to troll?
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#7
Quote from rootbear
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Then why are you on here commenting? Just to troll?
His opinion is very important, donchaknow?
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#8
Quote from N8_dog
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When a book is a leftist pulitzer winner and when leftist critics shovel acclaim i know the book is not for me.
I bet you read and liked The Art of The Deal though , amirite?
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#9
Quote from Ignatz
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His opinion is very important, donchaknow?
He's part of the Iamverysmart community.
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#10
This book is actually really good. This author writes like every sentence in a paragraph is poetry (the accessible poems by a simpleton like me, at least). The illustration of the narrator's thoughts and experience is very vivid.

This book is about a Vietnamese-American immigrant following the Vietnam war. He's half french, for those who are turned off by a non-Caucasian character. It's fictional, but almost every detail is true to detail of what an individual of this population went through. This book is not a sob story. It doesn't try to make immigrants look heroic. It does not try to convey a political message as a "moral of the story." Rather, it is about a intellectual's experience of the events as the story unravels.

A specific example that resonated with me was when the character reflected on the Vietnamese prostitutes during the collapse of Saigon. As I went through that passage, I went from judging the prostitutes, to understanding them, to sympathizing them, to being proud of them, and then learning how their prostitution is part of a cycle related to the political actions in Vietnam by foreign interests. That is why I like the book so much, because it is not about pushing an agenda on you but rather a reflection on how things are.

I don't think there is any novel like this out there. For its uniqueness and skill of the author, I recommend it. I went through this book via Audible. The performer was "Jules Pierre Mao" from the Expanse scifi show, so that was a treat.

Lastly, my 2 cents. I want to note that people have a tendency to politicized everything and not let their ignorance get in the way of that goal. "N8_dog" is a perfect example of this, already accusing the book of being leftist but not even bothering to learn more about it. It is refreshing because this book is the opposite of this common 2019 American Plebeian tendency. I think it is a good example of how we (the educated people) should reflect on any current issues.
Reply Helpful Comment? 27 1
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#11
I've been wanting to read this for awhile now. It's back on my radar though, thanks!. But as a real cheapskate I'll get it from the library. 😅
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#12
How tough/easy of a read is this for someone who doesn't read books much, but is looking to start?
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#13
Quote from N8_dog
:
When a book is a leftist pulitzer winner and when leftist critics shovel acclaim i know the book is not for me.
When an opinion is completely unrelated to finding a good deal, and when 28 people agree, I know the comment is not for me.
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#14
Quote from CrimsonMountain4601
:
How tough/easy of a read is this for someone who doesn't read books much, but is looking to start?
I think this is a pretty easy read. Now, don't even go near Cloud Atlas as the "future dialect" is hard to comprehend. Many many years ago when The Satanic Verses was controversial, I tried to read it and had to abandon.
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#15
Quote from BradFang
:
One of my professors assigned this as class reading without reading it first. Apparently there is a part where someone becomes intimate with a squid. I didn't read it myself but it made for a hilarious class when people had to discuss that portion haha.
Yeah, the squid incident is hilarious as hell.
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