Sorry, this deal has expired. Get notified of deals like this in the future. Add Deal Alert for this Item
Frontpage Deal

Prime Members: TP-Link Networking: AC1900 MU-MIMO Smart WiFi Router (Archer A9) EXPIRED

$70
$99.99
& Much More + Free S&H
+53 Deal Score
59,776 Views
Amazon.com has for their Prime Members: various TP-Link Networking Products on sale listed below. Shipping is free. Thanks DJ3xclusive

Available:No Longer Available:
Share
Good deal?
You gave thanks to DJ3xclusive for this post.
Thank you!
DJ3xclusive posted this deal. Say thanks!

Original Post

Written by
Edited July 15, 2019 at 01:56 AM by
If you purchase something through a post on our site, Slickdeals may get a small share of the sale.
Deal
Score
+53
59,776 Views
$70
$99.99
Don't have Amazon Prime? Students can get a free 6-Month Amazon Prime trial with free 2-day shipping, unlimited video streaming & more. If you're not a student, there's also a free 1-Month Amazon Prime trial available.

131 Comments

2 3 4 5 6

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jul 2005
L3: Novice
244 Posts
216 Reputation
#46
I got the range extender
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Feb 2014
L2: Beginner
95 Posts
22 Reputation
#47
Quote from Coop1979
:
Get the $15 MOCA adapters. They're rock solid 100M.
Could you please expand on this? I've been interested in MOCA because from what I understand, it's Ethernet over coax. I have coax installed in my walls where I don't have CAT5/6 installed in my walls.

I thought a MOCA setup was like this:

MOTOROLA MoCA Adapter for Ethernet Over Coax 2-Pack, 1,000 Mbps Bonded 2.0 MoCA (Model MM1002) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078HMDDVS/

That's no $15 expense. I've tried researching this and I can't ever figure it out.

So at my traditional router, I can convert CAT5e to coax with one of these and in the other room I use the other to convert that Coax line back to CAT5/6, is that right?

I would love to hardwire my PC and TV and just use wireless for mobile devices, IoT devices, etc.

Would a few MOCA things work with a mesh setup so I can provide wireless to wireless devices?

And where are you seeing MOCA adapters for $15?
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Apr 2009
L3: Novice
170 Posts
127 Reputation
#48
Quote from Raoul_Duke
:
Could you please expand on this? I've been interested in MOCA because from what I understand, it's Ethernet over coax. I have coax installed in my walls where I don't have CAT5/6 installed in my walls.

I thought a MOCA setup was like this:

MOTOROLA MoCA Adapter for Ethernet Over Coax 2-Pack, 1,000 Mbps Bonded 2.0 MoCA (Model MM1002) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078HMDDVS/

That's no $15 expense. I've tried researching this and I can't ever figure it out.

So at my traditional router, I can convert CAT5e to coax with one of these and in the other room I use the other to convert that Coax line back to CAT5/6, is that right?

I would love to hardwire my PC and TV and just use wireless for mobile devices, IoT devices, etc.

Would a few MOCA things work with a mesh setup so I can provide wireless to wireless devices?

And where are you seeing MOCA adapters for $15?
$16.50 right now per MOCA adapter, and obviously you'd need 2 to get started, but they provide a rock solid 100 Mb/s connection across coax.

You can look around and easily figure out how to shut off the WiFi on the since it's only N speeds, then connect your routers to each one via Ethernet and create your own Mesh network.

Actiontec Single Dual-Band Wireless Network Extender and Ethernet Over Coax Adapter (WCB3000N) https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B00FK...lDb4HY5XEX
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Feb 2014
L2: Beginner
95 Posts
22 Reputation
#49
Thanks, Coop1979. I appreciate the help! I'm going to bite.
Reply Helpful Comment? 1 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Aug 2005
L6: Expert
1,183 Posts
42 Reputation
Our community has rated this post as helpful. If you agree, why not thank ?
#50
Quote from gameson
:
btw, what's the difference between cheap (< $50) and expensive ( > $80) router ? I don't quite understand and confuse to buy as it seems the cheap router already have the essentials (gigabit, ac, etc)?

and any recommendation on router? Is AC1200 good enough for standard router used for cable internet? Thanks.
The number next to the AC equates to the sum of the speed output over the 5ghz and 2.4ghz bands. If you Google this, you will find articles on articles about it. Generally, the higher the number...the more expensive it will be.

I would recommend looking for an AC1900 or higher for future proofing for a couple years. Ac1200 is on the low side but will still do the trick if the price is right. The expensive routers generally have better CPUs too. I don't believe most consumers need anything crazy and the standard dual core CPUs will suffice.


Consumer internet speeds of 1000Mbps is a thing right now. Gigabit ports are equal to that number. Those routers boasting such amazing speeds will never be able to use anything more than 1000Mbps from your internet provider unless you have better than a gigabit port (which isn't a popular thing right now).

Working offline is a different story but wired lines will still be capped at 1000Mbps due to the gigabit ports. Working wirelessly can potentially take advantage of the high speeds (for offline data transmission such as streaming) but more than likely, your devices are capped at how much speed they can handle. Just because your router can transmit a lot of data doesn't mean your phone can.


General features are most likely similar within different models of a specific brand. Some expensive models may come with specific features but most people won't need it. So yes, all these routers probably have the features most consumers need.

All in all, you would have to look at your situation and see if you have a need for better equipment. Get something that takes advantage of what you currently have and will work well for a few years. Since technology is rapidly improving, there is no point in getting an expensive router that you can't take advantage of just to realize you need to buy a new one in a few years because of a new feature imo. At the same time, don't go so low end that you will need to buy new things if you ever get a higher rated connection from your ISP or want to take advantage of higher transmission rates for offline usage.
Reply Helpful Comment? 3 0
Last edited by neilp4453 July 15, 2019 at 10:54 AM.
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Dec 2011
L6: Expert
1,123 Posts
140 Reputation
#51
Quote from neilp4453
:
The number next to the AC equates to the sum of the speed output over the 5ghz and 2.4ghz bands. If you Google this, you will find articles on articles about it. Generally, the higher the number...the more expensive it will be.

I wouldn recommend looking for an AC1900 or higher for future proofing. Ac1200 is on the low side but will still do the trick if the price is right. The expensive routers generally have better CPUs too. I don't believe most consumers need anything crazy and the standard dual core CPUs will suffice.


Consumer internet speeds of 1000Mbps is a thing a now. Gigabit ports are equal to that number. Those routers boasting such amazing speeds will never be able to use anything more tha 1000Mbps from your internet provider unless you have better than a gigabit port (which isn't a thing right now). Basically, the expensive routers are overkill right now imo.

Working offline is a different story. Wired lines will still be capped by the gigabit port. Sending data wirelessly with the higher speed may be possible, but generally the other device (non-router) can't handle that much so once again, you are capped.


General features are most likely similar within different models of a specific brand. Some expensive models may come with specific features but most people won't need it. So yes, all these routers probably have the features most consumers need.
Thanks for the explanation. I am looking for a wifi router that is not capped by the gigabit. I guess from your explanation, ac1900 is the minimum for its wifi to be able to broadcast at the same speed as the gigabit port?

Thanks
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined May 2011
El Dudimas Frugalis
225 Posts
89 Reputation
#52
Quote from Coop1979
:
$16.50 right now per MOCA adapter, and obviously you'd need 2 to get started, but they provide a rock solid 100 Mb/s connection across coax.

You can look around and easily figure out how to shut off the WiFi on the since it's only N speeds, then connect your routers to each one via Ethernet and create your own Mesh network.

Actiontec Single Dual-Band Wireless Network Extender and Ethernet Over Coax Adapter (WCB3000N) https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B00FK...lDb4HY5XEX
Any reason a couple of these wouldn't work? I don't have cable TV service, so I don't think the common-ish frequencies would interfere with anything.
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/produ...9IHZ&psc=1
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Apr 2009
L3: Novice
170 Posts
127 Reputation
#53
Quote from DudeFrugal
:
Any reason a couple of these wouldn't work? I don't have cable TV service, so I don't think the common-ish frequencies would interfere with anything.
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/produ...9IHZ&psc=1
DECA adapters are great, and actually what I use in my own home, but you can't run DECA on the same coax as your cable modem, if that's what you have for internet. I have a separate dedicated line from the street that feeds my cable modem and TiVo, and then I connect the DECA adapter to my house internal coax wiring.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Aug 2005
L6: Expert
1,183 Posts
42 Reputation
#54
Quote from gameson
:
Thanks for the explanation. I am looking for a wifi router that is not capped by the gigabit. I guess from your explanation, ac1900 is the minimum for its wifi to be able to broadcast at the same speed as the gigabit port?

Thanks
Since the AC number is shared between 5ghz and 2.4ghz, technically you may want both bands to be able to achieve 1000Mbps if you want to cover all grounds. At this point, you will be looking at the expensive routers so imo, I don't think it is worth it. An Ac2600 will put you very close to hitting 1000Mbps on 2.4ghz (800 Mbps I believe) but the 5ghz will be well over what most consumers need. Maybe the 2600 or slightly higher will work for you (Google the speed distribution to make sure).

I believe Ac1900 only hits 600Mbps over the 2.4ghz band so not quite there. But 5ghz does hit over 1000Mbps. I'd say I would be okay in that situation but it will be your choice to purchase something better. I recommend buying the Ac1900 as a minimum threshold because they are generally on sale (~40bucks) and will give you some compatibility with a gigabit connection. I also believe this is the standard by which a lot of devices operate (going back to most devices not being able to take advantage of the insane speeds routers are boasting now a days).


Since new technology is able to take advantage of the 5ghz band, 2.4ghz is generally used for older tech and when having problems with the 5ghz band. Plus when there are multiple users using a mix of both bands at a the same time, it won't matter if the 2.4ghz isn't at 1000Mbps.

Edit: If you are looking for a wifi router not capped by a gigabit...you will need to purchase a more expensive router. Make sure the router has ports better than gigabit too. I might be mistaken by what you meant by that because this type of router will be very expensive.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Last edited by neilp4453 July 15, 2019 at 10:45 AM.
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Dec 2011
L6: Expert
1,123 Posts
140 Reputation
#55
Quote from neilp4453
:
Since the AC number is shared between 5ghz and 2.4ghz, technically you may want both bands to be able to achieve 1000Mbps if you want to cover all grounds. At this point, you will be looking at the expensive routers so imo, I don't think it is worth it. An Ac2600 will put you very close to hitting 1000Mbps on 2.4ghz (800 Mbps I believe) but the 5ghz will be well over what most consumers need. Maybe the 2600 or slightly higher will work for you (Google the speed distribution to make sure).

I believe Ac1900 only hits 600Mbps over the 2.4ghz band so not quite there. But 5ghz does hit over 1000Mbps. I'd say I would be okay in that situation but it will be your choice to purchase something better. I recommend buying the Ac1900 as a minimum threshold because they are generally on sale (~40bucks) and will give you some compatibility with a gigabit connection. I also believe this is the standard by which a lot of devices operate (going back to most devices not being able to take advantage of the insane speeds routers are boasting now a days).


Since new technology is able to take advantage of the 5ghz band, 2.4ghz is generally used for older tech and when having problems with the 5ghz band. Plus when there are multiple users using a mix of both bands at a the same time, it won't matter if the 2.4ghz isn't at 1000Mbps.

Edit: If you are looking for a wifi router not capped by a gigabit...you will need to purchase a more expensive router. Make sure the router has ports better than gigabit too. I might be mistaken by what you meant by that because this type of router will be very expensive.
I can get AC1900 for $40? The one on the first post is AC1200 for $30... If it's $10 more, i will get the AC1900
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Nov 2014
L3: Novice
252 Posts
17 Reputation
#56
Need to extend my router signal to my detached garage (about 100 feet away). What do you guys recommend? A range extender or repeater. Budget close to 50$. I would like to add a ring doorbell outside my garage near drive way and also be able to use remote start to open my garage from car. Thanks in advance. I use Linksys EA8500 router.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Oct 2011
L3: Novice
184 Posts
185 Reputation
#57
I have fios gig internet and I'm looking to extend my WiFi to my basement and 2nd floor. Small 1400 sq ft house. Either of these extenders will work, right?
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined May 2011
El Dudimas Frugalis
225 Posts
89 Reputation
#58
Quote from Coop1979
:
DECA adapters are great, and actually what I use in my own home, but you can't run DECA on the same coax as your cable modem, if that's what you have for internet. I have a separate dedicated line from the street that feeds my cable modem and TiVo, and then I connect the DECA adapter to my house internal coax wiring.
Coax cable enters from back yard junction box through basement and into my modem before jumping to Floor 1 router via CAT6 and out through floor to various devices. Have not yet found a suitable method to run to upstairs floor 2 devices yet and was hoping to utilize the existing coax in the walls that aren't being used for anything. Would be as follows:
primary coax > basement modem > CAT6 to Floor 1 router > CAT6 to DECA > coax to Floor 2 > DECA > CAT6 to device(s)

I think I'm understanding you correctly in that I should be fine since I'd only be using cold internal coax lines downstream from my router. Or are you saying it wouldn't work because the initial connection feed coming in to the modem from back-yard junction box is coax? Again, no cable TV or anything else, for that matter, running through internal coax.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Aug 2005
L6: Expert
1,183 Posts
42 Reputation
#59
Quote from gameson
:
I can get AC1900 for $40? The one on the first post is AC1200 for $30... If it's $10 more, i will get the AC1900
I don't see that deal on this thread. I'm referring to the T-Mobile AC1900 deals that show up from time to time. Walmart also puts routers on clearance from time to time. Other deals pop up too.

If you need something today, then that is a different story. This single core AC1200 would suffice but it hits 300mbps on 2.4ghz and 867 on 5ghz. Even with a connection rated 1000Mbps by your ISP, you should should still be good with multiple people using wifi. The price is okay for what it is. The fact is, if you never plan on getting a gigabit connection from your ISP, you will be good to go.

Since I've seen better deals for a 10-20 bucks more, I would personally keep shopping but that is up to you. There is a AC1900 on the front page of this tread for over double the price. If you search routers, there is a AC1700 for $60. Other deals might show up too. You can always take advantage of the free returns via Prime and just get the AC1200 now and be on the lookout for something better over the next few days.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Last edited by neilp4453 July 15, 2019 at 11:24 AM.

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jun 2008
L6: Expert
1,426 Posts
179 Reputation
#60
Quote from wm1234
:
Need to extend my router signal to my detached garage (about 100 feet away). What do you guys recommend? A range extender or repeater. Budget close to 50$. I would like to add a ring doorbell outside my garage near drive way and also be able to use remote start to open my garage from car. Thanks in advance. I use Linksys EA8500 router.
Same question
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Page 4 of 9
2 3 4 5 6
Join the Conversation
Add a Comment
 
Copyright 1999 - 2019. Slickdeals, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Copyright / Infringement Policy  •  Privacy Policy  •  Terms of Service  •  Acceptable Use Policy (Rules)  •  Interest-Based Ads
Link Copied to Clipboard