Sorry, this deal has expired. Get notified of deals like this in the future. Add Deal Alert for this Item
Frontpage Deal

Manfrotto 77mm Professional Protect UV Filter EXPIRED

$12
$49.88
+ Free Shipping
+39 Deal Score
14,156 Views
Adorama.com has Manfrotto 77mm Professional Protect UV Filter on sale for $11.95. Shipping is free. Thanks iconian
Share
Good deal?
You gave thanks to iconian for this post.
Thank you!
iconian posted this deal. Say thanks!

Original Post

Written by
Edited August 29, 2019 at 11:54 AM by
deal [adorama.com]

$12 + free s/h
If you purchase something through a post on our site, Slickdeals may get a small share of the sale.
Deal
Score
+39
14,156 Views
$12
$49.88

53 Comments

1 2 3 4

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Oct 2017
L2: Beginner
72 Posts
22 Reputation
#31
Quote from thinh4u2
:
If only their ND filters were this price.

I baby my gear and don't really need the protection filters. The lens hood and cleaning kit does just fine. Even when I was at the beach.
That's what many people think (self included) until they learn better. Unless you've literally never tripped or fumbled while sober, it's going to happen. Better to invest in a few relatively inexpensive filters than find out the hard way.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Aug 2007
L2: Beginner
48 Posts
18 Reputation
#32
Quote from amax
:
So dumb. Wiping the UV filter with a shirt, not a lint-free cloth using lens cleaning solution, is the worst factor of all destroying your image quality, apart from the totally unnecessary "UV filtration." Folks: put on your lens cap when you're not using your camera. Take off your lens cap when you take a picture or shoot video. This is not debatable.
You certainly have not taken pictures in challenging situations, like constant water spray near a waterfall. Lint-free is not particle free after a few wipes, and you can run out of it quickly if you have to wipe it after every picture. So you will just take pictures with water spots because wiping it with tshirt is the worst, right?

I will just say this. For people who don't use protection filters, it's their business and philosophy. But calling others who do use those dumb, it only shows the ignorance and inexperience.
Reply Helpful Comment? 1 1
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jun 2005
L7: Teacher
2,347 Posts
2,784 Reputation
#33
size matters.
Ok bad joke. Won't affect haze
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Sep 2011
L1: Learner
23 Posts
11 Reputation
#34
I put UVs or Sky(s) on all my lenses.. An old timer when I was just starting out said "It's a lot easier and cheaper to replace a filter than a lens if you ding the front of the lens and toast the filter threads than to replace or trying to to fix the ding on the lens threads." .

There's a good chance if you drop the camera from any great height and lands on the lens hopefully only the lens will brake , especially plastic bodied lenses. I have one of my cameras fall found ~8' in a neoprene (Camera only.) case square on the front of the lens (Plastic), the lens looked like it had been used in a front end crash dummy test,, yet the filter was fine !!

A local camera shop (Film days, long gone.) had a display of falling soldiers, The amount of filters convinced me that filters are cheap protection !! A lot of mountain climbers and hikers, mostly webbed from getting wracked against a mountain, tree, drop on pointed rocks on a trail, and yes a few didn't save the lens, yet most did..

Cleaning, that same person said, basically, "Never clean your lenses and that cheap filter is once again better to damage then the lens". On that note think about the things you're protecting by using that filter,,, for me it's mostly been sea spray from being on the ocean, finger prints {Mostly mine !!}, spit , mine trying to blow dust of, other's when talking to you, and so much more.. What to clean that cheap filter, Think soft , almost anything that one wears or touches to use is out of the question, that tea shirt your wearing most likely has body oils in / on it.. I've never had good luck with lens paper, whatever you used make sure you use it flat no corners or edges, I scratched a lens using a corned of folded lens paper..

Cases and lens covers,, I learned a lot from the couple of weekends I spent with that old man some 30+ years ago !! his take "If the cameras in a case or the lens is covered you're not taking pictures.." !! My take on it adds the time it takes one to take the cap off (If you remember that the camera has a lens cap on !!, It sucks to see the black of of oops.. ) the shots gone.. I lose caps all the time , I try to put them in a pocket on myself (Still lose them..), I've tried clips, strings,etc, most get in the way or still find there way to who knows where..

Lastly $11.00 for a 77mm fliter is a good price for a 77mmm size any type of filter..

My Take
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined May 2010
L5: Journeyman
557 Posts
81 Reputation
#35
I have tried many, the only $10 filters I buy are Fotasy. Truly multi coated, no side effect to image quality. Other cheap filters add "wires" to long lenses and ghost.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Feb 2008
L7: Teacher
2,934 Posts
1,255 Reputation
#36
Quote from Jwildperson
:
In digital photography, the haze effects of UV are diminished, but definitely still there in many settings. Give it a shot!
Atmospheric haze is not the same as UV haze. Anything that you're seeing is your own mind playing tricks on you, in the same way that in the right situation, to the right person, a placebo is like 80% as effective as real medicine. Go read up on ultraviolet photography. It is impossible to get any UV to hit any kind of digital sensor these days. And if the differences were this obvious, don't you think that Nikon/Canon/Olympus/Zeiss/Sony would just incorporate UV blocking elements into their camera lenses? You might as well go buy a vial of snake oil to keep in your camera bag to absorb crystal energy, if you're going to go waste your money on nonsense stuff.

Quote from coheedcollapse
:
I've heard people suggest that they'd technically reduce haze, but I've never actually seen any proof of it.

I primarily use it for mostly transparent lens protection. Myself and pretty much every person I know who shoots on a daily basis doesn't have time to baby lenses when shooting. Dirty lens? Take care of it with your shirt. I feel better doing that with a UV filter on.
You've never seen any proof of it because it isn't true. ULTRAviolet isn't visible to most humans. If you see a hazy scene with your bare eyes, then it's because of atmospheric haze, not ultraviolet haze. Like I said to the guy above, go look at UV photography. Go look at ultraviolet photography bandpass filters. To get the effects of UV haze on a contemporary digital camera, you'd have to have one with 14 or more stops of dynamic range, AND you'd have to expose the photo by like 8 stops, and then you might see some miniscule effects of UV haze, but it would be an academic exercise because there would not be any useful photo of the actual subject. It would be a white screen with tiny amounts of pixels hazed out.

Quote from dem5867
:
I put UVs or Sky(s) on all my lenses.. An old timer when I was just starting out said "It's a lot easier and cheaper to replace a filter than a lens if you ding the front of the lens and toast the filter threads than to replace or trying to to fix the ding on the lens threads." .

There's a good chance if you drop the camera from any great height and lands on the lens hopefully only the lens will brake , especially plastic bodied lenses. I have one of my cameras fall found ~8' in a neoprene (Camera only.) case square on the front of the lens (Plastic), the lens looked like it had been used in a front end crash dummy test,, yet the filter was fine !!

A local camera shop (Film days, long gone.) had a display of falling soldiers, The amount of filters convinced me that filters are cheap protection !! A lot of mountain climbers and hikers, mostly webbed from getting wracked against a mountain, tree, drop on pointed rocks on a trail, and yes a few didn't save the lens, yet most did..

Cleaning, that same person said, basically, "Never clean your lenses and that cheap filter is once again better to damage then the lens". On that note think about the things you're protecting by using that filter,,, for me it's mostly been sea spray from being on the ocean, finger prints {Mostly mine !!}, spit , mine trying to blow dust of, other's when talking to you, and so much more.. What to clean that cheap filter, Think soft , almost anything that one wears or touches to use is out of the question, that tea shirt your wearing most likely has body oils in / on it.. I've never had good luck with lens paper, whatever you used make sure you use it flat no corners or edges, I scratched a lens using a corned of folded lens paper..

Cases and lens covers,, I learned a lot from the couple of weekends I spent with that old man some 30+ years ago !! his take "If the cameras in a case or the lens is covered you're not taking pictures.." !! My take on it adds the time it takes one to take the cap off (If you remember that the camera has a lens cap on !!, It sucks to see the black of of oops.. ) the shots gone.. I lose caps all the time , I try to put them in a pocket on myself (Still lose them..), I've tried clips, strings,etc, most get in the way or still find there way to who knows where..

Lastly $11.00 for a 77mm fliter is a good price for a 77mmm size any type of filter..

My Take
You aren't going to ding the front of your lens. I've seen more $10 filters break, and then that broken glass scratches up the lens, than I have seen the front element of a lens get scratched from a tree branch or whatever. What WILL happen is you know what happens when you put a $10 piece of glass in front of your $800 lens? You end up with a $10 photo.

Also, this isn't like the film days, because our sensors aren't sensitive to the UV spectrum.

Your old timer friend was just suckered by some camera shop salesperson. Many shops end up discounting camera lenses, and barely make anything on them. However, they might make 400% or more markup on stupid stuff like filters and cleaning kits. So if you're buying an $799 lens on sale for $699, the shop might only make let's say $40 profit. But then you go buy $80 worth of accessories, they've now gone from a $40 profit on a $700 sale to a $100 profit on a $780 sale.

The camera shop only put lenses on display that serve their agenda, to convince you to buy their stuff.
Reply Helpful Comment? 1 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Aug 2005
Cyberpunk
4,489 Posts
1,090 Reputation
#37
Quote from shnitz
:
Atmospheric haze is not the same as UV haze. Anything that you're seeing is your own mind playing tricks on you, in the same way that in the right situation, to the right person, a placebo is like 80% as effective as real medicine. Go read up on ultraviolet photography. It is impossible to get any UV to hit any kind of digital sensor these days. And if the differences were this obvious, don't you think that Nikon/Canon/Olympus/Zeiss/Sony would just incorporate UV blocking elements into their camera lenses? You might as well go buy a vial of snake oil to keep in your camera bag to absorb crystal energy, if you're going to go waste your money on nonsense stuff.


You've never seen any proof of it because it isn't true. ULTRAviolet isn't visible to most humans. If you see a hazy scene with your bare eyes, then it's because of atmospheric haze, not ultraviolet haze. Like I said to the guy above, go look at UV photography. Go look at ultraviolet photography bandpass filters. To get the effects of UV haze on a contemporary digital camera, you'd have to have one with 14 or more stops of dynamic range, AND you'd have to expose the photo by like 8 stops, and then you might see some miniscule effects of UV haze, but it would be an academic exercise because there would not be any useful photo of the actual subject. It would be a white screen with tiny amounts of pixels hazed out.


You aren't going to ding the front of your lens. I've seen more $10 filters break, and then that broken glass scratches up the lens, than I have seen the front element of a lens get scratched from a tree branch or whatever. What WILL happen is you know what happens when you put a $10 piece of glass in front of your $800 lens? You end up with a $10 photo.

Also, this isn't like the film days, because our sensors aren't sensitive to the UV spectrum.

Your old timer friend was just suckered by some camera shop salesperson. Many shops end up discounting camera lenses, and barely make anything on them. However, they might make 400% or more markup on stupid stuff like filters and cleaning kits. So if you're buying an $799 lens on sale for $699, the shop might only make let's say $40 profit. But then you go buy $80 worth of accessories, they've now gone from a $40 profit on a $700 sale to a $100 profit on a $780 sale.

The camera shop only put lenses on display that serve their agenda, to convince you to buy their stuff.
Werd. This precisely.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Aug 2007
L4: Apprentice
442 Posts
74 Reputation
#38
Quote from amax
:
So dumb. Wiping the UV filter with a shirt, not a lint-free cloth using lens cleaning solution, is the worst factor of all destroying your image quality, apart from the totally unnecessary "UV filtration." Folks: put on your lens cap when you're not using your camera. Take off your lens cap when you take a picture or shoot video. This is not debatable.
I'm out in the field in weird situations every single day and have been for over a decade. Sometimes getting rained on, getting sprayed by waves from the lake, dust clouds kicking up. You name it. I'm not shooting in a studio or shooting once every few weeks like a lot of gearheads. I'm hiking with my camera, working with it, using it every single day.

I don't have the time or ability to get a fresh lens cloth every time I need to wipe my lens off. Sometimes, when it's rainy, I'll be wiping it off a dozen times in a job. If I need my lens clear IMMEDIATELY, I don't have time go to through a routine to make sure that nothing will scratch it.

Pixel-peepers love to obsess over every single tiny aberration that they can pick out in a photo blown up 200% in Lightroom and claim victory over the plebes over something that nobody will ever see. Ever.

Yes, a junk filter will noticeably affect your IQ, but something like this, with a retail price of $50 from a known reputable brand isn't likely to create issues outside of very, very specific circumstances.

Anyway, the REASON that I've ever used a UV filter is because I can toss it when it gets scratched. Good glass filters will hold up to nearly as much as a front element, so a few swipes with a t-shirt isn't going to mess anything up until you've got a piece of sand embedded in there, and even the fanciest lint-free-cloth won't affect that problem unless you put it through the wash every time you take it to your lens and thoroughly use a blower to knock off dust and sand every time you even think of cleaning your lens.
Quote from jedec
:
If you must clean your lens, use a lint-free tissue (no reuse).
However, most people clean their lenses way too often than necessary.
I certainly don't clean my lens often, but if it's raining on me or if dust is kicking up, it's absolutely necessary, and that lint-free tissue won't matter a tiny bit if that dust on your front element is made of something harder than glass. Unless you also suggest bringing a blower along to make sure all debris is clear before using that wipe. Many types of photographers don't have the time to sit down and walk through an exhaustive, scratch-free, cleaning routine when they're shooting.

Again, not saying that these things are necessary by any means - I've gone the past four or so years without one, but pretending like they're some sort of unnecessary death-knell to the quality of your images is silly as hell. If you're spending a few thousand on glass, it's nice to have a removable filter you can shoot through if you're going to be encountering rough situations or if you think you'll need to clean your front element in the field. Microscratches (or gouges) on a filter are cheaper to fix than sending your lens to Nikon or Canon to get the front element replaced.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 1
Last edited by coheedcollapse August 31, 2019 at 10:59 AM.
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Oct 2004
L4: Apprentice
332 Posts
58 Reputation
#39
Quote from grindswiss
:
Just make sure to remove when doing low light photography
100% not necessary.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Oct 2004
L4: Apprentice
332 Posts
58 Reputation
#40
Quote from amax
:
May I suggest that people who still use UV filters are like people who sit on park benches for hours feeding the pigeons? Because use your lens cap.
You actually got that backwards.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Oct 2016
L1: Learner
18 Posts
40 Reputation
#41
In for two, past time to replace that protector that's been saving my Canon 70-200L for the past 15+years. Love the lens, been through the film days and a couple of digital cameras. It shows the evidence of effectiveness with light scratches and such. At $12, a spare for it or the 24-105L are a no brainer.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Oct 2004
L4: Apprentice
332 Posts
58 Reputation
#42
Quote from poidog
:
Lots of pros and cons for UV filters. My 2 cents worth, if you are not using your overpriced camera (still or video) in dusty or coastline conditions, you don't need one. Just yesterday I was using a lens with UV filter and was necessary as I was about 60 ft away from helicopter throwing dust and debris in my direction. UV filter can also help you save the front element of your expensive lens from scratches and such when hiking trails etc. If you are mostly taking candids of family and friends or kids' sports events, save your money.
One last thing, when you do use filters, spend a little more and go for the thinner profile filters like B&W to limit any possible vignetting. If you still want UV filters and for best bang for the buck, use step up rings with the largest filter size lens, to cover your smaller lens filter sized lenses.
I put B+W filters on everything. Slim profile looks perfect and the UV look completely empty to the naked eye the glass is so clear. I only take one off if I'm swapping. Haven't put a lens cap on anything in years.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Feb 2019
L2: Beginner
25 Posts
10 Reputation
#43
The protection filters have saved my ton of bucks during incident. You just spend a little more time to take it off or on. Recommend.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Aug 2007
L2: Beginner
48 Posts
18 Reputation
#44
Quote from shnitz
:
What WILL happen is you know what happens when you put a $10 piece of glass in front of your $800 lens? You end up with a $10 photo.
You must be taking $800 photos all the time.
Reply Helpful Comment? 1 0

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Aug 2009
L10: Grand Master
7,659 Posts
1,030 Reputation
#45
Quote from grindswiss
:
Just make sure to remove when doing low light photography
not sure why these threads bring out so much ignorance...
Reply Helpful Comment? 1 0
Page 3 of 4
1 2 3 4
Join the Conversation
Add a Comment
 

Shop More Black Friday Deals

Copyright 1999 - 2019. Slickdeals, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Copyright / Infringement Policy  •  Privacy Policy  •  Terms of Service  •  Acceptable Use Policy (Rules)  •  Interest-Based Ads
Link Copied to Clipboard