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New Google Express Users: Texas Instruments TI-Nspire CX II Graphing Calculator EXPIRED

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Best Buy via Google Express has Texas Instruments TI-Nspire CX II Graphing Calculator on sale for $110.49 when you apply promo code SEPTSAVE19. Shipping is free. Thanks daisybeetle

Note, sale price is valid only for New Google Express Members, otherwise is $130.99
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Edited September 6, 2019 at 07:21 PM by
As a parent I had the pleasure of having to order one of these this year.

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Texas Instruments TI-Nspire CX II Graphing Calculator [google.com] $130.49 - $20 w/ New Customer code SEPTSAVE19 = $110.49. Shipping is free.
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#61
Quote from JHamy
:
I have to call BS on this. You earned a degree in "math/stats", not usually how a mathematician speaks. Further, this calculator you reference states that it's for "high school math", yet you were solving partial differential equations on yours? If you really did what you've claimed, then you're truly a brilliant person. Just know that the average person will need the tools that are recommended by the person teaching the subject. Visualization is a powerful learning tool, don't discount it to save $50. To imply a teacher is lesser because they recommend a calculator out of your desired price range is ludicrous, btw...
I'm guessing you didn't go to college for math based major from your post. First off, plenty of people refer to a math or stats major just as that, not some hardo that insists on "Mathematics". I was technically an actuarial science major, but most people don't know what that is so I just put math/stats (which would be similar) to make it easy for people understand.

Your specific example about differential equations, I would assume most professors prefer you know how they work rather than plugging an equation into a calculator. It doesn't take a genius, it's literally what you're meant to learn in the courses. Especially on exams where time is essential, it actually saves a lot of time to know how to solve by hand rather than inputting a complex equation, and often times professors make a question that can't be solved by inputting numbers into a calc (ie. If a question says "Show")

99% of the time, the most advanced function you will need on a calculator is storing numbers into a variable, which you can do on non/graphing calcs (like the TI-30XS I mentioned).
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#62
Quote from SkillfulWeather4126
:
Haha, this is cool if smartphones didn't exist. TI sat on their monopoly for thirty years without innovating or lowering prices and now they want to lower prices on their top tech. About twenty years too late
Doesn't matter. The books are still written using TI syntax. The classes are taught by memorizing how to input problems on a TI. Nobody is saying, go online and find a good quadratics solver. That skill is too transferable to be considered "education"
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#63
Quote from CoralApple8830
:
I'm guessing you didn't go to college for math based major from your post. First off, plenty of people refer to a math or stats major just as that, not some hardo that insists on "Mathematics". I was technically an actuarial science major, but most people don't know what that is so I just put math/stats (which would be similar) to make it easy for people understand.

Your specific example about differential equations, I would assume most professors prefer you know how they work rather than plugging an equation into a calculator. It doesn't take a genius, it's literally what you're meant to learn in the courses. Especially on exams where time is essential, it actually saves a lot of time to know how to solve by hand rather than inputting a complex equation, and often times professors make a question that can't be solved by inputting numbers into a calc (ie. If a question says "Show")

99% of the time, the most advanced function you will need on a calculator is storing numbers into a variable, which you can do on non/graphing calcs (like the TI-30XS I mentioned).
Eh. There is something to having history and scrolling. I used my 89 15 years ago just to check as I went along. Sure, I could put in the full integral or differential, but that was just a bonus to double check.

Like you said, it is mostly used for arithmetic. Bun when you are knee deep in showing your work, you want to be able to scroll up and see where things went wrong if they did.
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#64
Quote from xtp
:
This is insane, you're just making shit up, you don't solve diff-eq with a calculator, most of the time you don't solve them at all, in high lvl courses I've taken, I was instructed to demonstrate a few steps, and skip any tedious number work that comes up, obviating any calculator use, because data-entry is not what you're there to learn.

And the poster you reponded to is correct, you don't need a graphing calculator for the majority of college math courses.

In the rare case, you might use graphing to find an asymptote or decide on a solve strategy, but this is rare and only in very specific courses.
You're totally right on about higher level stuff - the vast majority of the "work" is either done on paper (save for some annoying calculation), or is actually too advanced / tedious for completion on anything but a computer (think Mathematica/MatLab/stats stuff i.e. Stata/R/SAS etc).

That said, speaking as an "uneducated math teacher" (I was a high school math teacher who also happens to have multiple "math/stats" degrees including one in education) there are a variety of reasons to suggest students have an easy to manipulate graphing calculator, but lots of them wouldn't necessarily resonate with the types of people who end up with higher level math degrees. For lots of reasons (including prior math experience) for many students, being able to quickly and accurately graph a variety of equations (and be able to distinguish between them) can do wonders for conceptual understanding in classes like Algebra 1. A skilled math teacher is not the same as the person with the most degrees or the best GPA in college math, which barely aligns to what's taught in high school. Rather, the skill comes in being able to explain / teach to students who will not eventually be getting those higher level degrees. And while smartphones/tablets have lots of great apps, it's worth analogizing to trying to do word processing on an iPad - sure, it works, but it's a lot harder than using a "real" laptop (at least for many folks), and having a standard set/model for the class means less barriers to learning.

This is all just to say that for parents that are on the fence about dropping the $$$ on one of these calculators, chat with your students' math teacher, see what their plans are, ask if they provide specific instructions (in class) for just *this* (or any specific) calculator, as opposed to more general instructions (i.e. "graph this line). If you've got a kid who's into figuring stuff out on their own, then they'll likely be able to figure out how to make a cheaper (i.e Casio or older used model via CL/eBay) model work for them for most of what happens in a high school class. Could your child get by with just a four-function calculator that you could get at the dollar store? Probably, but assuming the calculator will necessarily be more helpful if your child is planning on being a college math major is a mistake.

[And all THAT said...these are WAY too expensive for what they are (blame College Board and ETS for virtually mandating these for AP/SAT etc); the TI-89 I bought in 2000ish still has far more than I'd ever need to teach high school students (and in some ways has some functionality I'd like to disable!). I think schools should be funded to the point where some version of a graphing calculator can be provided to students, free of charge, as they walk in the door...but that's a conversation for another time...]
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#65
Quote from mxwjs
:
Eh. There is something to having history and scrolling. I used my 89 15 years ago just to check as I went along. Sure, I could put in the full integral or differential, but that was just a bonus to double check.

Like you said, it is mostly used for arithmetic. Bun when you are knee deep in showing your work, you want to be able to scroll up and see where things went wrong if they did.
Agreed I won't use a calc without these, but non-graphing calcs can do these too. Again going back to my trusty TI-30XS multiview Smilie
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#66
Quote from JHamy
:
I have to call BS on this. You earned a degree in "math/stats", not usually how a mathematician speaks. Further, this calculator you reference states that it's for "high school math", yet you were solving partial differential equations on yours? If you really did what you've claimed, then you're truly a brilliant person. Just know that the average person will need the tools that are recommended by the person teaching the subject. Visualization is a powerful learning tool, don't discount it to save $50. To imply a teacher is lesser because they recommend a calculator out of your desired price range is ludicrous, btw...
nope, he's right...
graphing calculators make you bad at math while your in school. if you can't understand what the calculator is doing, you're not learning. it's disgusting these days that they give and make students use calculators as early as 5th grade... at that level, there's no need for them to ever have one and all it does it make the kids not learn the basics at a young age. they're really doing kids a disservice these days.
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#67
Quote from CoralApple8830
:
I'm guessing you didn't go to college for math based major from your post. First off, plenty of people refer to a math or stats major just as that, not some hardo that insists on "Mathematics". I was technically an actuarial science major, but most people don't know what that is so I just put math/stats (which would be similar) to make it easy for people understand.

Your specific example about differential equations, I would assume most professors prefer you know how they work rather than plugging an equation into a calculator. It doesn't take a genius, it's literally what you're meant to learn in the courses. Especially on exams where time is essential, it actually saves a lot of time to know how to solve by hand rather than inputting a complex equation, and often times professors make a question that can't be solved by inputting numbers into a calc (ie. If a question says "Show")

99% of the time, the most advanced function you will need on a calculator is storing numbers into a variable, which you can do on non/graphing calcs (like the TI-30XS I mentioned).
I think it's important to note that non-graphing calcs (i.e. ones like the TI-30XS) actually HAVE made some massive gains in functionality, especially if you're comparing to an old single-line version (as in the TI-30xa). For a lot of us, calculators like the TI-30XS that could do more advanced probability, data analysis, variable storage, etc (i.e. things that you really DO need a calculator for) in the price/package of an old scientific calculator simply didn't exist when we were in high school. Not to mention, the visual representation of fractions / square roots etc is great for students still getting a grasp on PEMDAS/more complex algebraic expressions (think pre-algebra).
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#68
This is so old tech now. Any iphone and android phone can get a cheap app and do the same graphic calc. Schools need to move with the times... My son already is using a chrome book for elementary school, and required to bring it to school everyday. Assignments are done on chrome book and submitted to the teacher.
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#69
I still have my Ti-83 plus and Ti-84 plus I got like 15-ish years ago. Cant believe these things are still commanding $100+.
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#70
Quote from psyctto
:
nope, he's right...
graphing calculators make you bad at math while your in school. if you can't understand what the calculator is doing, you're not learning. it's disgusting these days that they give and make students use calculators as early as 5th grade... at that level, there's no need for them to ever have one and all it does it make the kids not learn the basics at a young age. they're really doing kids a disservice these days.
You do make a valid point. I myself believe it's good to have a solid foundation of almost anything you learn. From a solid mathematics foundation, one can recreate more advanced mathematics without "memorizing" them. I forgot the formula for the volume of a sphere, but I remembered I could integrate the area of a circle to get the volume.

Okay, BUT, I have listened to arguments about how the internet and advanced tools now negate the need for everyone to have a solid foundation, because these tools are now universally available for anyone to use at anytime. There will always be a select few people to build and maintain these advanced tools for all to use. It allows a larger number of people to use (but not understand) advanced mathematics in their careers.

I understand both arguments, and I would surmise there isn't one way, and both can be applied in careers. Personally, as a society, I think it would be far more beneficial that a large majority of the people understand how to use the tools that are available versus spending copious amounts of time and resources teaching everyone a strong foundation, especially when only a small percentage will apply that knowledge to their careers. For me, it all comes down to the ROI of a student's time. In AP and Honors math, teach a strong foundation to those who will use it. In mainstream math, teach those kids how to use the tools available to them. I see value in both... Education is not a one size fits all proposition.
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Last edited by UnstableChimp September 6, 2019 at 12:00 PM.
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#71
Quote from freestylejunki
:
And? It's available directly from TI website...
Do you have a link to the download on that site?

Is this the page? - https://education.ti.com/en/softw...9-titanium

Is it "TI-89 Titanium Operating System"? I see that but it is not an instant download there is a form field to fill out then you must wait for it to be approved by TI after saying you own the product and describing why you need the download.
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#72
Quote from Gethome
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Do you have a link to the download on that site?

Is this the page? - https://education.ti.com/en/softw...9-titanium

Is it "TI-89 Titanium Operating System"? I see that but it is not an instant download there is a form field to fill out then you must wait for it to be approved by TI after saying you own the product and describing why you need the download.
Yeah, from that link: "The operating system may ONLY be used on a TI handheld graphing calculator or an emulator provided by TI. Usage of the operating system on a third party device (such as a cell phone or tablet) or a third party emulator is prohibited."

Which is just to say it's available, but not allowed...
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#73
Quote from Gethome
:
Do you have a link to the download on that site?

Is this the page? - https://education.ti.com/en/softw...9-titanium

Is it "TI-89 Titanium Operating System"? I see that but it is not an instant download there is a form field to fill out then you must wait for it to be approved by TI after saying you own the product and describing why you need the download.
That looks like it. Just make up something. I own the actual calculator and download the OS update years ago now and just saved it into my Google drive so over the years when I get a new phone I just reload it easily
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#74
Quote from Ilovedeals
:
Texas Instruments monopoly means 20 year old technology for $100 or more
Yeah but why aren't competitors knocking these off? Nothing is proprietary about math.
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#75
I picked up a TI-nSpire cx CAS for $64 on ebay for my son. these things have problems with pixels going out or extras turning on (IIRC its a cable issue, i watched repair videos, it's not easy to fix), so if buying used you need to look out for that.
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