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Fender FA-235E Concert Acoustic Electric Guitar EXPIRED

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Adorama.com has Fender FA-235E Concert Acoustic Electric Guitar on salefor $189 - $90 Slickdeals Mail-In Rebate = $99. Shipping is free. Thanks iconian

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This price matches the previous Frontpage Deal from August. Limit of 1 rebate per household.

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Edited September 5, 2019 at 11:02 AM by
deal [adorama.com]

$189 - $90 slickdeals rebate [4myrebate.com] = $99 + free shipping

This rebate will require:
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  2. Completed and signed Rebate Form [4myrebate.com] from above links
  3. Copy of your Invoice
  4. Postmarked within 30 days of purchase date
  5. Though not a requirement, it is recommended to mail using a trackable postage method.
Tips:
  • Please visit Our Blog for a comprehensive guide on Slickdeals Rebates.
  • Read all info. If you have questions, please let us know: rebates@slickdeals.net
  • Rebate expires 9/10/19 11:59pm EDT.
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Featured Comments

IMHO, no. I would suggest starting someone out on an electric guitar and here's why.

1. Acoustic strings are thicker and therefore not as flexible. Fretting at the first fret requires a lot of force on an acoustic as compared to an electric.
2. Acoustic guitars require a heavier strum. I'm fighting myself to stop strumming so freaking hard on my electric. The harder strumming will lead to fatigue at early stages.
3. Acoustic guitars typically have a wider nut (the area at near the headstock).

Please understand that guitar is a difficult instrument to play. It requires coordination between both hands (as does piano), and the strings will hurt the fingers on the fret hand at first. This will last a few weeks. You'll build up callouses and that will make the pain disappear. I'd suggest getting a set of 9's for strings on an electric guitar. They are thinner wires and therefore flex more easily.

Also, a guitar isn't a one-time purchase. You need the guitar, a headstock-mounted tuner (clip on type -- get a Snark 2 for $15 or so on Amazon. Strings need to be replaced as older strings don't give as good of a sound. Replacing strings every month or two is good for someone playing maybe an hour a day. Strings are $5-8 per set and there are youtube videos on how to change strings. NEVER buy a single pack of strings. The first couple of times you change strings, you're likely to break one or more. You need a bag or hard case for the guitar, a music stand, a guitar stand, a strap, and picks. For an electric, you need a guitar cable and an amp. A guitar almost always needs a "set up", and the cheap ones always do. This is a one-time initial cost of anywhere from $60-100. Although, most serious player get a set up every year of so as well. They adjust the neck, check and level frets, polish the frets, set action (to make the guitar easier to play and less painful on the fingers), adjust intonation, and generally check things out.

Avoid the "all in one" starter packs as they are usually the bottom of the barrel in every piece.

I understand that we all have different budgets, and I don't want to scare you off. Guitars are very fun to play. If you have disposable income, please allow me to suggest that you and your 9 year old both get guitars and take lessons together. Lessons are usually about $30 for 30 mins. There's a lot you can learn from the internet. Justinguitar.com is a great resource (you can also find him on youtube, but on his site, you have the ability to track progress through courses, marking which ones you've completed, etc.

There was a great deal recently (ran out of stock quickly) for the Squire 72 thinline semi-hollow for $300 (200 after rebate). I spent a little over $100 on the setup because I had them replace the nut with a bone nut and it REALLY needed a setup. It was bad out of the box, but just needed adjustments and fret leveling to make it play great.

An electric guitar will make sound without an amp, and you can start with a cheap amp (you WILL want to upgrade later).

My suggestion to you would be to go to a guitar store that stocks a decent number of guitars and try some out. Ignore the price tags for now. You simply want to "feel" different options. You will want to try a Les Paul, Telecaster, and Stratocaster. You'll want to try a Fender Player series strat and an Ibanez strat with the Wizard 3 neck. If they have something with a thick neck, look at it too. I realize you don't know how to play, but try to just fret the strings (all 6 of them) on a thick neck and on a wizard 3. You're simply looking for how they feel in your hand. Move your hand up and down the neck, fretting various strings. Feel how your hand glides up and down the neck and how much work you have to put into reaching the top string. The Wizard 3 is one of the thinnest necks I know of in a production guitar. Now, take a Les Paul and an s-series Ibanez Strat and feel how they balance. Les Pauls have a tendancy to want to neck dive (heavier neck and headstock). The s-series Ibanez is one of the thinnest body guitars I know of. Again, you're getting a feel for how they feel to you, in your hands. Now, take a strat and just start strumming. That volume knob you keep hitting -- that's how strats are. Personally, they annoy me for that reason. Now play a telecaster, notice you don't have that issue. I've not played a Les Paul, but I think they also don't have that issue. Ask one of the guys working there to play a single-coil and a humbucker, so you can hear the difference (amp required as the pickups only matter when you're plugged in). I personally prefer humbuckers, but I am new to the game. So, after doing all of what I've suggested, I think you'll land either on an HSS strat (humbucker and two single-coils) or a double humbucker telecaster. BUT, that may not be where you land.

If checking out used guitars, beware of the "Fender strat" look at the headstock, if it says "Squier by Fender", it's a Squier. The $200 (after rebate) telecaster that was in the expired deal, that I love dearly, it's a Squier, but the resale value of Fender vs Squire isn't the same. Squire is Fenders "cheap" line. Epiphone is Gibson's "cheap" line. This doesn't make them bad, but when you see a Fender strat is $600 or so new, don't fall for the used "Squier by Fender" for $200 and think you're getting the same guitar for 1/3 of the price.

Now that I've had you try out a bunch of guitars and you've landed on something you like but don't want to spend that much money, that's okay. Now we start looking at good starter guitars -- do not be fooled, these aren't super-cheap, crappy guitars, they are inexpensive value propositions. Squier (within the last several years) makes good value-priced guitars. Yamaha's Pacifica line is well respected as well. I currently own 4 guitars, a First Act (from a slick deal for under $50 -- it is a decent guitar, but it collects dust now), a Yamaha acoustic (my "first" guitar, but it was just too difficult to play AND I just didn't have "will" to push through and learn). It comes out somewhat often, but certainly isn't a daily player for me. The "easy" songs to learn are often songs originally recorded on acoustics and sound better (or more true to the original) on an acoustic, but the majority of my practice of those same songs is still on the electrics. I have a $679 retail price Fender Player Series strat, and that $200 (after rebate) Squier 72 thinline telecaster. The $200 Squier gets played more than the much more expensive Fender strat, because I like it better. I can't articulate why, and the specs say it's the same general neck as the strat, but it feels better in my hands. The Fender has much better "fit and finish", but the Squier feels better to me. It may be that the semi-hollow telecaster is balanced differently than the solid body stratocaster (most telecasters are NOT semi-hollow). Unplugged, the Squier sounds better and plugged in, it sounds better (that specific model of telecaster has wide-range humbuckers, so it's not a tele vs strat issue, it's that specific model of telecaster thing). The next best price on that 72 thinline was $350 with no rebate, so it was a really, really good deal.

Finally, if you have a local guitar store that isn't part of a big chain, when you go to buy a guitar, try them first. If they aren't competitive in price or don't carry what you want, move on. I just ask that you try them first. Also, please understand that most every brand of guitar and amps require MAP pricing (Minimum ADVERTISED Price). You should be able to knock 20% off that cost pretty easily just by asking. The retailer can sell it cheaper, they just can't ADVERTISE it cheaper (without permission).

I hope this helped, and thank you for reading my novel Smilie
23 Helpful?

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#3
Gonna try this out. Will report back.
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#4
Tempting. Anyone have experience with this guitar?
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#5
This one is still not a full size.
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#6
How is this guitar to play? Any feedback?
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#7
This same guitar has been available off and on at this price for about 6 months. I am really interested in a full size, so I will wait a little bit, although it is interesting how the other colors cost so much more money. They have one in sunburst.
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#8
Will this be good for an almost 9 year old starting to learn guitar?
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#9
Quote from EmulationStation
:
Tempting. Anyone have experience with this guitar?
My son tried it out at Guitar center. He's been playing for a couple years. He liked it a lot. I don't play, but thought it sounded good too. Biggest complaint I've read about it is that it is small, but it doesn't seem bad event for an older teenager or if you aren't a picky adult.
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#10
Quote from rjs4331
:
My son tried it out at Guitar center. He's been playing for a couple years. He liked it a lot. I don't play, but thought it sounded good too. Biggest complaint I've read about it is that it is small, but it doesn't seem bad event for an older teenager or if you aren't a picky adult.
I'm a big guy and that's my only concern is the size
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#11
Quote from coolpal
:
Will this be good for an almost 9 year old starting to learn guitar?
Our Guitar center has one to play with, YMMV if one near you has one. It is smaller than a full size guitar, I suspect it may still be a bit large for a 9 y/o but that may be a personal preference.
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#12
Quote from EmulationStation
:
I'm a big guy and that's my only concern is the size
I hear ya, personal preferences are what they are. My son said "it's not that much smaller" compared to full size.
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#13
Quote from coolpal
:
Will this be good for an almost 9 year old starting to learn guitar?
IMHO, no. I would suggest starting someone out on an electric guitar and here's why.

1. Acoustic strings are thicker and therefore not as flexible. Fretting at the first fret requires a lot of force on an acoustic as compared to an electric.
2. Acoustic guitars require a heavier strum. I'm fighting myself to stop strumming so freaking hard on my electric. The harder strumming will lead to fatigue at early stages.
3. Acoustic guitars typically have a wider nut (the area at near the headstock).

Please understand that guitar is a difficult instrument to play. It requires coordination between both hands (as does piano), and the strings will hurt the fingers on the fret hand at first. This will last a few weeks. You'll build up callouses and that will make the pain disappear. I'd suggest getting a set of 9's for strings on an electric guitar. They are thinner wires and therefore flex more easily.

Also, a guitar isn't a one-time purchase. You need the guitar, a headstock-mounted tuner (clip on type -- get a Snark 2 for $15 or so on Amazon. Strings need to be replaced as older strings don't give as good of a sound. Replacing strings every month or two is good for someone playing maybe an hour a day. Strings are $5-8 per set and there are youtube videos on how to change strings. NEVER buy a single pack of strings. The first couple of times you change strings, you're likely to break one or more. You need a bag or hard case for the guitar, a music stand, a guitar stand, a strap, and picks. For an electric, you need a guitar cable and an amp. A guitar almost always needs a "set up", and the cheap ones always do. This is a one-time initial cost of anywhere from $60-100. Although, most serious player get a set up every year of so as well. They adjust the neck, check and level frets, polish the frets, set action (to make the guitar easier to play and less painful on the fingers), adjust intonation, and generally check things out.

Avoid the "all in one" starter packs as they are usually the bottom of the barrel in every piece.

I understand that we all have different budgets, and I don't want to scare you off. Guitars are very fun to play. If you have disposable income, please allow me to suggest that you and your 9 year old both get guitars and take lessons together. Lessons are usually about $30 for 30 mins. There's a lot you can learn from the internet. Justinguitar.com is a great resource (you can also find him on youtube, but on his site, you have the ability to track progress through courses, marking which ones you've completed, etc.

There was a great deal recently (ran out of stock quickly) for the Squire 72 thinline semi-hollow for $300 (200 after rebate). I spent a little over $100 on the setup because I had them replace the nut with a bone nut and it REALLY needed a setup. It was bad out of the box, but just needed adjustments and fret leveling to make it play great.

An electric guitar will make sound without an amp, and you can start with a cheap amp (you WILL want to upgrade later).

My suggestion to you would be to go to a guitar store that stocks a decent number of guitars and try some out. Ignore the price tags for now. You simply want to "feel" different options. You will want to try a Les Paul, Telecaster, and Stratocaster. You'll want to try a Fender Player series strat and an Ibanez strat with the Wizard 3 neck. If they have something with a thick neck, look at it too. I realize you don't know how to play, but try to just fret the strings (all 6 of them) on a thick neck and on a wizard 3. You're simply looking for how they feel in your hand. Move your hand up and down the neck, fretting various strings. Feel how your hand glides up and down the neck and how much work you have to put into reaching the top string. The Wizard 3 is one of the thinnest necks I know of in a production guitar. Now, take a Les Paul and an s-series Ibanez Strat and feel how they balance. Les Pauls have a tendancy to want to neck dive (heavier neck and headstock). The s-series Ibanez is one of the thinnest body guitars I know of. Again, you're getting a feel for how they feel to you, in your hands. Now, take a strat and just start strumming. That volume knob you keep hitting -- that's how strats are. Personally, they annoy me for that reason. Now play a telecaster, notice you don't have that issue. I've not played a Les Paul, but I think they also don't have that issue. Ask one of the guys working there to play a single-coil and a humbucker, so you can hear the difference (amp required as the pickups only matter when you're plugged in). I personally prefer humbuckers, but I am new to the game. So, after doing all of what I've suggested, I think you'll land either on an HSS strat (humbucker and two single-coils) or a double humbucker telecaster. BUT, that may not be where you land.

If checking out used guitars, beware of the "Fender strat" look at the headstock, if it says "Squier by Fender", it's a Squier. The $200 (after rebate) telecaster that was in the expired deal, that I love dearly, it's a Squier, but the resale value of Fender vs Squire isn't the same. Squire is Fenders "cheap" line. Epiphone is Gibson's "cheap" line. This doesn't make them bad, but when you see a Fender strat is $600 or so new, don't fall for the used "Squier by Fender" for $200 and think you're getting the same guitar for 1/3 of the price.

Now that I've had you try out a bunch of guitars and you've landed on something you like but don't want to spend that much money, that's okay. Now we start looking at good starter guitars -- do not be fooled, these aren't super-cheap, crappy guitars, they are inexpensive value propositions. Squier (within the last several years) makes good value-priced guitars. Yamaha's Pacifica line is well respected as well. I currently own 4 guitars, a First Act (from a slick deal for under $50 -- it is a decent guitar, but it collects dust now), a Yamaha acoustic (my "first" guitar, but it was just too difficult to play AND I just didn't have "will" to push through and learn). It comes out somewhat often, but certainly isn't a daily player for me. The "easy" songs to learn are often songs originally recorded on acoustics and sound better (or more true to the original) on an acoustic, but the majority of my practice of those same songs is still on the electrics. I have a $679 retail price Fender Player Series strat, and that $200 (after rebate) Squier 72 thinline telecaster. The $200 Squier gets played more than the much more expensive Fender strat, because I like it better. I can't articulate why, and the specs say it's the same general neck as the strat, but it feels better in my hands. The Fender has much better "fit and finish", but the Squier feels better to me. It may be that the semi-hollow telecaster is balanced differently than the solid body stratocaster (most telecasters are NOT semi-hollow). Unplugged, the Squier sounds better and plugged in, it sounds better (that specific model of telecaster has wide-range humbuckers, so it's not a tele vs strat issue, it's that specific model of telecaster thing). The next best price on that 72 thinline was $350 with no rebate, so it was a really, really good deal.

Finally, if you have a local guitar store that isn't part of a big chain, when you go to buy a guitar, try them first. If they aren't competitive in price or don't carry what you want, move on. I just ask that you try them first. Also, please understand that most every brand of guitar and amps require MAP pricing (Minimum ADVERTISED Price). You should be able to knock 20% off that cost pretty easily just by asking. The retailer can sell it cheaper, they just can't ADVERTISE it cheaper (without permission).

I hope this helped, and thank you for reading my novel Smilie
Reply Helpful Comment? 25 2
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Joined Nov 2007
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#14
Quote from gobblygook
:
IMHO, no. I would suggest starting someone out on an electric guitar and here's why.

1. Acoustic strings are thicker and therefore not as flexible. Fretting at the first fret requires a lot of force on an acoustic as compared to an electric.
2. Acoustic guitars require a heavier strum. I'm fighting myself to stop strumming so freaking hard on my electric. The harder strumming will lead to fatigue at early stages.
3. Acoustic guitars typically have a wider nut (the area at near the headstock).

Please understand that guitar is a difficult instrument to play. It requires coordination between both hands (as does piano), and the strings will hurt the fingers on the fret hand at first. This will last a few weeks. You'll build up callouses and that will make the pain disappear. I'd suggest getting a set of 9's for strings on an electric guitar. They are thinner wires and therefore flex more easily.

Also, a guitar isn't a one-time purchase. You need the guitar, a headstock-mounted tuner (clip on type -- get a Snark 2 for $15 or so on Amazon. Strings need to be replaced as older strings don't give as good of a sound. Replacing strings every month or two is good for someone playing maybe an hour a day. Strings are $5-8 per set and there are youtube videos on how to change strings. NEVER buy a single pack of strings. The first couple of times you change strings, you're likely to break one or more. You need a bag or hard case for the guitar, a music stand, a guitar stand, a strap, and picks. For an electric, you need a guitar cable and an amp. A guitar almost always needs a "set up", and the cheap ones always do. This is a one-time initial cost of anywhere from $60-100. Although, most serious player get a set up every year of so as well. They adjust the neck, check and level frets, polish the frets, set action (to make the guitar easier to play and less painful on the fingers), adjust intonation, and generally check things out.

Avoid the "all in one" starter packs as they are usually the bottom of the barrel in every piece.

I understand that we all have different budgets, and I don't want to scare you off. Guitars are very fun to play. If you have disposable income, please allow me to suggest that you and your 9 year old both get guitars and take lessons together. Lessons are usually about $30 for 30 mins. There's a lot you can learn from the internet. Justinguitar.com is a great resource (you can also find him on youtube, but on his site, you have the ability to track progress through courses, marking which ones you've completed, etc.

There was a great deal recently (ran out of stock quickly) for the Squire 72 thinline semi-hollow for $300 (200 after rebate). I spent a little over $100 on the setup because I had them replace the nut with a bone nut and it REALLY needed a setup. It was bad out of the box, but just needed adjustments and fret leveling to make it play great.

An electric guitar will make sound without an amp, and you can start with a cheap amp (you WILL want to upgrade later).

My suggestion to you would be to go to a guitar store that stocks a decent number of guitars and try some out. Ignore the price tags for now. You simply want to "feel" different options. You will want to try a Les Paul, Telecaster, and Stratocaster. You'll want to try a Fender Player series strat and an Ibanez strat with the Wizard 3 neck. If they have something with a thick neck, look at it too. I realize you don't know how to play, but try to just fret the strings (all 6 of them) on a thick neck and on a wizard 3. You're simply looking for how they feel in your hand. Move your hand up and down the neck, fretting various strings. Feel how your hand glides up and down the neck and how much work you have to put into reaching the top string. The Wizard 3 is one of the thinnest necks I know of in a production guitar. Now, take a Les Paul and an s-series Ibanez Strat and feel how they balance. Les Pauls have a tendancy to want to neck dive (heavier neck and headstock). The s-series Ibanez is one of the thinnest body guitars I know of. Again, you're getting a feel for how they feel to you, in your hands. Now, take a strat and just start strumming. That volume knob you keep hitting -- that's how strats are. Personally, they annoy me for that reason. Now play a telecaster, notice you don't have that issue. I've not played a Les Paul, but I think they also don't have that issue. Ask one of the guys working there to play a single-coil and a humbucker, so you can hear the difference (amp required as the pickups only matter when you're plugged in). I personally prefer humbuckers, but I am new to the game. So, after doing all of what I've suggested, I think you'll land either on an HSS strat (humbucker and two single-coils) or a double humbucker telecaster. BUT, that may not be where you land.

If checking out used guitars, beware of the "Fender strat" look at the headstock, if it says "Squier by Fender", it's a Squier. The $200 (after rebate) telecaster that was in the expired deal, that I love dearly, it's a Squier, but the resale value of Fender vs Squire isn't the same. Squire is Fenders "cheap" line. Epiphone is Gibson's "cheap" line. This doesn't make them bad, but when you see a Fender strat is $600 or so new, don't fall for the used "Squier by Fender" for $200 and think you're getting the same guitar for 1/3 of the price.

Now that I've had you try out a bunch of guitars and you've landed on something you like but don't want to spend that much money, that's okay. Now we start looking at good starter guitars -- do not be fooled, these aren't super-cheap, crappy guitars, they are inexpensive value propositions. Squier (within the last several years) makes good value-priced guitars. Yamaha's Pacifica line is well respected as well. I currently own 4 guitars, a First Act (from a slick deal for under $50 -- it is a decent guitar, but it collects dust now), a Yamaha acoustic (my "first" guitar, but it was just too difficult to play AND I just didn't have "will" to push through and learn). It comes out somewhat often, but certainly isn't a daily player for me. The "easy" songs to learn are often songs originally recorded on acoustics and sound better (or more true to the original) on an acoustic, but the majority of my practice of those same songs is still on the electrics. I have a $679 retail price Fender Player Series strat, and that $200 (after rebate) Squier 72 thinline telecaster. The $200 Squier gets played more than the much more expensive Fender strat, because I like it better. I can't articulate why, and the specs say it's the same general neck as the strat, but it feels better in my hands. The Fender has much better "fit and finish", but the Squier feels better to me. It may be that the semi-hollow telecaster is balanced differently than the solid body stratocaster (most telecasters are NOT semi-hollow). Unplugged, the Squier sounds better and plugged in, it sounds better (that specific model of telecaster has wide-range humbuckers, so it's not a tele vs strat issue, it's that specific model of telecaster thing). The next best price on that 72 thinline was $350 with no rebate, so it was a really, really good deal.

Finally, if you have a local guitar store that isn't part of a big chain, when you go to buy a guitar, try them first. If they aren't competitive in price or don't carry what you want, move on. I just ask that you try them first. Also, please understand that most every brand of guitar and amps require MAP pricing (Minimum ADVERTISED Price). You should be able to knock 20% off that cost pretty easily just by asking. The retailer can sell it cheaper, they just can't ADVERTISE it cheaper (without permission).

I hope this helped, and thank you for reading my novel https://static.slickdealscdn.com/ima...lies/smile.gif
Very comprehensive post!

I would add that for anyone starting an instrument, it's better to go cheap at first and if you enjoy it, buy into quality later.
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#15
Quote from gobblygook
:
Novel /snip
Also, a guitar isn't a one-time purchase. You need the guitar, a headstock-mounted tuner (clip on type -- get a Snark 2 for $15 or so on Amazon. /snip
I believe this one has a tuner. I have dozens of electrics but I haven't had an acoustic in 30 years. I only bought it because I like purple guitars and the ridiculous price.
Got the invoice today. The rebate is as simple as printing 2 pieces of paper and mailing a letter.Applause
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