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Teac TN-400S Belt-driven Turntable w/ S-Shaped Tonearm EXPIRED

$165
$449.99
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+61 Deal Score
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Update: This offer is available again with a $4 price-drop.

BuyDig.com has Teac TN-400S Belt-driven Turntable w/ S-Shaped Tonearm (Various Colors) on sale for $165 when you apply promo code SPIN in cart or 'clip' the coupon on the product page. Shipping is free. Thanks iconian

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Edited October 12, 2019 at 09:46 AM by
Teac TN-400S Belt-driven Turntable w/ S-Shaped Tonearm $179 -->Now $169 -> now $165 + free s/h using coupon SPIN
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Joined Jan 2008
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#61
I collected vinyl for a solid decade...probably had over 1500 lps by the mid eighties when I switched to CDs...which I have well over 1000. Sold my vinyl and turntable (Thorens 320) about 20 years ago with zero regrets.

High end turntables were 100% belt drives back then. I can't think of a $1000+ turntable that was direct drive. And the best ones were totally manual as the tonearm was often custom installed.

I use Google Play now...mainly because I can upload my CDs/concerts that aren't available on streaming services. I listen to albums in their entirety all the time. As for the sound...it's the music that matters.
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#62
Quote from JimBanville
:
There's manual, semi auto and fully auto TT's. Most of the fully manual TT's were either basically toys (because they were as basic and made from the cheapest materials as humanly possible) or high-end (because audiophiles think any tiny extra part or mechanism can mess up the sound). Semi and fully auto TT's lived in the middle range. I'd say most of those were semi auto...they just had auto return.
Actually the mechanics for semi and fully automatic turntables can influence the sound quality. Here's my reply to a similar thread from a year and a half ago:

https://slickdeals.net/forums/showpost.php?p=112666363&postcount=92

Most middle of the road to high end turntables will be belt driven and manual. The most they will do at the end of the record is stop the platter from spinning and maybe lift the tonearm. My circa early '80 Harman/Kardon T65C turntable does this and it was a turntable that sold for about $600 brand new or about the quarter of the price of a well equipped Linn Sondek LP12.
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Joined Dec 2014
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#63
Quote from Ryman546
:
is the speakers are powered and have phono inputs youll be good. otherwise youll need something to power the speakers.
Speakers don't have built-in phono preamp.


Quote from TVM925
:
Yes speaker are power and have audio inputs. I have the Mackie CR5 BT
You will need a phono preamp of some sort.
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#64
This makes me want to buy this, go home and spin the Ghostbusters soundtrack and Tiffany and Debbie Gibson's debut albums.

Don't judge me. I can feel you judging me.
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#65
Quote from LowryHoover
:
expired
as of 1811 CST, you're wrong.
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#66
I went with a Fluance over the Teac. However I'm not getting very good customer service after it showed up damage. Hope I don't regret it.
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Joined Dec 2012
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#67
Quote from seang86s
:
Actually the mechanics for semi and fully automatic turntables can influence the sound quality. Here's my reply to a similar thread from a year and a half ago:

https://slickdeals.net/forums/showpost.php?p=112666363&postcount=92

Most middle of the road to high end turntables will be belt driven and manual. The most they will do at the end of the record is stop the platter from spinning and maybe lift the tonearm. My circa early '80 Harman/Kardon T65C turntable does this and it was a turntable that sold for about $600 brand new or about the quarter of the price of a well equipped Linn Sondek LP12.
I've repaired a few auto and semi auto turntables. The mechanisms that moved the tonearms on those units were in no contact whatsoever with the tonearm unless they were actually moving it. Some use gears that are powered by the platters motor. Some used separate motors for the tonearm movement. Either way, neither the motor nor tonearm are affected by the movement mechanism while the record is playing. The mechanisms are completely disengaged.

Oh. And I had one of the newer project debut tables a couple years ago. About $500. It's belt driven and fully manual. The motor noise/hum was ridiculous! I had to buy some neoprene washers to further isolate the motor from the plinth. I reduced the noise by about 80% but didn't completely illuminate it. I wrote project who said they were coming out with a dc motor version (mine was AC) and suggested I buy that instead. What a joke. Leaving a defective product on the market. I sent that junk back. It was pretty tho, lol 😂😂😂
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Last edited by JimBanville September 24, 2019 at 06:11 PM.

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Joined Jun 2006
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#68
Quote from ubersanger
:
Generally only the cheap, low end turntable have automatic functions these days. A couple of reasons: 1. The audiophile community spoke against it for many years as the mechanisms for automatic systems create noise and do not allow for good isolation. 2. It's trendy for the wannabes to go without as it's more "authentic" and "analog feeling"

A few decent turntables do have a basic auto shut-off system that just shuts the motor off when you reach the end of a record, but that's the most "auto" you find these days.

If vinyl continues to be hot for the long term, it will be interesting to see if the automatic features stage a comeback.
Turntables that shut off at the end of the record and/or lift the tonearm have been around for many decades. it is easy to engineer in that feature without any negative effects on the sound experience.

The audiophile community did not speak against this type of functionality.

Just as direct drive turntables are not inherently bad, and belt drive turntables are not inherently good.
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#69
Quote from kwadguy
:
Turntables that shut off at the end of the record and/or lift the tonearm have been around for many decades. it is easy to engineer in that feature without any negative effects on the sound experience.

The audiophile community did not speak against this type of functionality.

Just as direct drive turntables are not inherently bad, and belt drive turntables are not inherently good.
When I think of "audiophile" turntables I picture the ones with an actual separate motor.m assembly. Those use what looks like almost a thick thread to drive the spindle/platter section. The tonearm section is fully manual and is also sometimes completely separated from the motor and spindle/platter assemblies.
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#70
Quote from JimBanville
:
There's manual, semi auto and fully auto TT's. Most of the fully manual TT's were either basically toys (because they were as basic and made from the cheapest materials as humanly possible) or high-end (because audiophiles think any tiny extra part or mechanism can mess up the sound). Semi and fully auto TT's lived in the middle range. I'd say most of those were semi auto...they just had auto return.
Most likely I had one of these lower end Technics models, similar to this one see link:

https://vintagetechnics.audio/sho...90dCI7fQ==

It was fully manual. At the end of the record, you would slide the front switch to raise the tonearm. Personally I never had an issue with manual operation, when the record ended, I lifted the arm and turned off the player. But I guess if left unattended often, then at least having an auto raising of the arm at the end could be a convenient feature.

Also I remember at the time (mid-80s) a friend of mine bought what was called a radial arm turntable by Technics. Basically it had a straight arm that did not pivot. Rather it moved on a type of rod using servos or something, tracking with the record groove. I recall that turntable did have some auto features.

One cool thing, I still have my 80's Technics receiver. Looks and runs like brand new. Front brushed aluminum with dials and lit radio station scale. Looks real nice compared to most newer generic black receivers. Glad I hung onto it.
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#71
Can't say no to it. Thanks OP
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#72
Should I repair my Technic SL 1200MK or get this...my 20 years old Technics SL 1200MK2 pitch control seems unstable..up and down issues...
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#73
Quote from djkraft
:
Should I repair my Technic SL 1200MK or get this...my 20 years old Technics SL 1200MK2 pitch control seems unstable..up and down issues...
I'm in the same boat. Buy this or something else or buy a new needle/cartridge for a Pioneer PL25.
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#74
Quote from djkraft
:
Should I repair my Technic SL 1200MK or get this...my 20 years old Technics SL 1200MK2 pitch control seems unstable..up and down issues...
Lol 😂😂😂
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#75
Quote from Evenous
:
I have purchased both a TN-200 and a TN-400 on buydig deals listed on this site. Have had great luck with both. I am an experienced audio fan, and much like Technics from the 70s and early 80s, I'm finding Teac gear to be great picks that outperform their price (I also own a Teac CD player and HD Radio). This is a great place to start with record players. My only note to serious audio fans is that the cartridge is "equivalent", not an actual Audio Technica. I replaced mine with the real thing, but most listeners won't notice any difference.
I do not have this table and thus cannot speak to the cartridge/stylus which is fitted to it. The actual AT100 is discontinued (now two generations old). Recognize that phono stylii matter a lot. An aftermarket replacement stylus would almost certainly be inferior (sometimes grossly so) to an AT OEM stylus. Historically, AT made LOTS of cartridges (many of which were rebranded for other vendors). It is thus quite possible that this table sports the real deal albeit w/o logo. I would expect that a "real" AT100 would be quite appropriate for this table. If the stylus provided with the table is a "generic" an upgrade could be worthwhile. If it is an actual (but unlabeled) AT100 stylus, spend your dollars on vinyl rather than a better cartridge which probably exceeds the capabilities of this table. Just my $.02
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