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14" AmazonBasics Pre-Seasoned Cast Iron Wok Pan EXPIRED

$26.60
$31.38
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+24 Deal Score
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Amazon has 14" AmazonBasics Pre-Seasoned Cast Iron Wok Pan on sale for $26.61. Shipping is free. Thanks Corwin
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Edited October 9, 2019 at 01:06 AM by
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$26.60
$31.38
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#16
I wonder what the flavor is since it's "pre-seasoned". is it possible to choose flavoring?Peace
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#17
PeaceI wonder what the flavor is since it's "pre-seasoned". is it possible to choose flavoring?
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#18
Cast iron is a terrible material for a wok
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#19
price still too high. Just wait
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#20
No idea if this is a good wok. But cast iron woks are good because they hold heat. If you have a really powerful stove, carbon steel woks are better. If you have a normal stove, like most people, your flame won't get the wok back to temperature after adding food and you won't get a good stir fry. Cast iron woks, once heated (and this makes them smoke a lot!), will not suffer from this same problem. I have one (not this one, but a more expensive model I got from the Wok Shop in SF) and it works better on my middle-of-the-road gas range than my nice carbon steel one.

Also, the dual handle model (which doesn't lend itself to flipping) is used in many regions of China. It's just as legit as a single handle model.
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#21
I know this kind of a post is generally discouraged because it's not specifically about this deal, but I just can't keep quiet!

Unless you have a proper heat source, and I've never heard of a home kitchen that has one, don't purchase a wok for your home!

Here's why: Woks work so well in restaurants with a proper heat source because the entire surface gets heated to a very high temperature to cook things quickly and evenly. Only a small portion of the bottom of a wok that sits on top of a typical stove actually gets any heat from the stove, so only a small portion of the food really gets the heat that's needed for a proper stir-fry. Not only that, I'm not aware of any typical home stoves that put out the amount of heat necessary for a proper stir-fry. It's a one-two punch argument for not trying to use a wok for stir-frying at home.

If you look at a wok at a restaurant that properly features wok-style cooking, you'll notice the entire wok sits inside a cavity that's blast heated to heat its entire surface to a very high heat. Make sense? For home stir-frying, you're best off using something that's the opposite of a wok -- a frying pan with a very flat bottom to give the food inside the pan that most direct heat contact possible -- and turn that heat up as high as possible when you cook!
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Last edited by Turdcicle October 9, 2019 at 08:41 AM.
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#22
Ordered. Then cancelled based on emerging doubts. It might wok ok but maybe not good enough. I'm not likely to toss with anything but a spat (even if the weight wouldn't bother me) but still it may not get hot enough fast enough given its mass. Might work great for non-wok cooking though. Scrambled eggs for a family of ten for example.
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#23
Quote from StueyG09
:
Wouldn't suggest for induction, they are very heavy. I'll be honest, I've done nothing but regret buying mine.
That is what I figured. It would be nice to get a char but seems too heavy to properly cook. I've never liked cast iron ever and I don't think this is for me either. Thanks for your input
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#24
Quote from CleverSeed378
:
Cast iron is a terrible material for a wok
yeah. go to any chinese restaurant. the woks are not cast iron.
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#25
Quote from Bgunn925
:
Total culinary noob here, what's the advantage of this over a standard frying pan?
There is no advantage! Don't purchase a wok for home use! Use a frying pan with a very flat bottom for much better heat contact on a typical stove. A wok's shape allows for only a small amount of direct contact with the heat source on a home stove. That's not good at all!
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#26
I don't get the heavy cast iron woks. The cast iron deep skillets make more sense to use on north american stoves, as it's more versatile.
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#27
Quote from BenjaminY9066
:
No idea if this is a good wok. But cast iron woks are good because they hold heat. If you have a really powerful stove, carbon steel woks are better. If you have a normal stove, like most people, your flame won't get the wok back to temperature after adding food and you won't get a good stir fry. Cast iron woks, once heated (and this makes them smoke a lot!), will not suffer from this same problem. I have one (not this one, but a more expensive model I got from the Wok Shop in SF) and it works better on my middle-of-the-road gas range than my nice carbon steel one.

Also, the dual handle model (which doesn't lend itself to flipping) is used in many regions of China. It's just as legit as a single handle model.
Whoa. Someone who knows their stuff? On slickdeals? Blasphemy
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#28
the Lodge pan was recently on sale and i expect it to be on sale again as prices for Lodge products drop as they scale up with their new foundry. yes the Lodge was more expensive when it was on sale (~$12 more)

i would rather buy the Lodge product and support American jobs. is there anything wrong with the amazon basics one? prob not, who knows. is one thicker than the other? i don't know. any pre-seasoning differences are a moot point as you will want to re-season either brand before using it for the first time in my experience. Amazon only offers 1 year warranty i believe, Lodge is lifetime. not much to go wrong with a cast iron cookware item, but it's still nice to know Lodge has your back.

should you ever experience an issue with a Lodge product. you email them a photo of the defect, a photo of the imprint on the bottom of the pan, order confirmation/receipt and in 7-12 business days you will have a brand new pan at your door.

i know it's hard to pass up on a cheap"er" cast iron deal when compared to the competition, but.....

Lodge Tennessee Factory video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oj2qCi-ruoY . as the video states, the factory has employed generations of employees. to me, that's easily worth the extra for a durable good product so i can support that
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#29
Is this made in USA or China?
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#30
Quote from Turdcicle
:
I know this kind of a post is generally discouraged because it's not specifically about this deal, but I just can't keep quiet!

Unless you have a proper heat source, and I've never heard of a home kitchen that has one, don't purchase a wok for your home!

Here's why: Woks work so well in restaurants with a proper heat source because the entire surface gets heated to a very high temperature to cook things quickly and evenly. Only a small portion of the bottom of a wok that sits on top of a typical stove actually gets any heat from the stove, so only a small portion of the food really gets the heat that's needed for a proper stir-fry. Not only that, I'm not aware of any typical home stoves that put out the amount of heat necessary for a proper stir-fry. It's a one-two punch argument for not trying to use a wok for stir-frying at home.

If you look at a wok at a restaurant that properly features wok-style cooking, you'll notice the entire wok sits inside a cavity that's blast heated to heat its entire surface to a very high heat. Make sense? For home stir-frying, you're best off using something that's the opposite of a wok -- a frying pan with a very flat bottom to give the food inside the pan that most direct heat contact possible -- and turn that heat up as high as possible when you cook!
They make electric woks for home use. They heat evenly. Lighten up homie.
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