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14" AmazonBasics Pre-Seasoned Cast Iron Wok Pan EXPIRED

$26.60
$31.38
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+24 Deal Score
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Amazon has 14" AmazonBasics Pre-Seasoned Cast Iron Wok Pan on sale for $26.61. Shipping is free. Thanks Corwin
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Edited October 9, 2019 at 01:06 AM by
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$26.60
$31.38
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Joined Jul 2008
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#31
Quote from skywalker0175
:
PeaceI wonder what the flavor is since it's "pre-seasoned". is it possible to choose flavoring?
I bought one with strawberry flavor
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Joined Oct 2014
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#32
Quote from FHRITP
:
They make electric woks for home use. They heat evenly. Lighten up homie.
I'm light, dawg, I'm light!

You make a great point, but I'm willing to bet home cooks generally think of the type of wok in this deal when they consider purchasing one rather than purchasing an electric wok. Even still, most -- but not all -- electric woks only heat the small bottom portion of the wok rather than the entire surface, which still makes my point valid. You have to know what to look for in an electric wok to get one that works better than using a regular flat-bottom frying pan on top of a typical home stove.
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Joined Jun 2016
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#33
Please no more debate over cast iron vs carbon steel woks in deals like this.
Advice for novice: If you do not have a restaurant style rocket burner at home but want to get stir fry flavor, just try both and decide. The result will be obvious.
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El Jefe
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#34
14" is kinda too big for most of the folks. It may not fit your standard stove top. At least that's what my experience is. I have a 14" wok and 12". 12" works and fits perfectly
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Joined Mar 2013
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#35
Quote from Bgunn925
:
Total culinary noob here, what's the advantage of this over a standard frying pan?
This will get nuclear hot, way hotter than a typical wok or a "standard" sauté/fry pan, which may actually be kind of awesome for stir fry, the thing a wok does best. You would just be stirring only though, won't be able to toss and flip with this. Stir fry is meant to be done on very high heat, and your ingredients are meant to be cut small/thin, so that the food gets cooked quickly with a bit of caramelization/browning without becoming soft or mushy.
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#36
I like these cast iron woks for cooking on the grill or directly over coals.
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#37
Quote from garycook
:
Please no more debate over cast iron vs carbon steel woks in deals like this.
Advice for novice: If you do not have a restaurant style rocket burner at home but want to get stir fry flavor, just try both and decide. The result will be obvious.
So what's the obvious result? I don't want to buy both.
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#38
Quote from JeffR2413
:
This will get nuclear hot, way hotter than a typical wok or a "standard" sauté/fry pan, which may actually be kind of awesome for stir fry, the thing a wok does best. You would just be stirring only though, won't be able to toss and flip with this. Stir fry is meant to be done on very high heat, and your ingredients are meant to be cut small/thin, so that the food gets cooked quickly with a bit of caramelization/browning without becoming soft or mushy.
Are you your biggest fan?
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#39
Quote from garycook
:
Please no more debate over cast iron vs carbon steel woks in deals like this.
Advice for novice: If you do not have a restaurant style rocket burner at home but want to get stir fry flavor, just try both and decide. The result will be obvious.
I don't know anyone who uses a wok made of cast iron. It is not really a debate. I have stainless steel; non stick; and cast iron pots and pans, they all have their uses. But for a wok, stick with carbon steel. I've been "woking" for over 30 years.
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#40
Quote from herbertlew
:
I don't know anyone who uses a wok made of cast iron. It is not really a debate. I have stainless steel; non stick; and cast iron pots and pans, they all have their uses. But for a wok, stick with carbon steel. I've been "woking" for over 30 years.
wordd
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#41
Quote from Turdcicle
:
I know this kind of a post is generally discouraged because it's not specifically about this deal, but I just can't keep quiet!

Unless you have a proper heat source, and I've never heard of a home kitchen that has one, don't purchase a wok for your home!

Here's why: Woks work so well in restaurants with a proper heat source because the entire surface gets heated to a very high temperature to cook things quickly and evenly. Only a small portion of the bottom of a wok that sits on top of a typical stove actually gets any heat from the stove, so only a small portion of the food really gets the heat that's needed for a proper stir-fry. Not only that, I'm not aware of any typical home stoves that put out the amount of heat necessary for a proper stir-fry. It's a one-two punch argument for not trying to use a wok for stir-frying at home.

If you look at a wok at a restaurant that properly features wok-style cooking, you'll notice the entire wok sits inside a cavity that's blast heated to heat its entire surface to a very high heat. Make sense? For home stir-frying, you're best off using something that's the opposite of a wok -- a frying pan with a very flat bottom to give the food inside the pan that most direct heat contact possible -- and turn that heat up as high as possible when you cook!
I disagree. I have a 14 inch cast iron wok and it works perfectly on gas stovetop. My stovetop does have a burner with two rings. Even if your stove has regular burners, this wok should work fine. The good thing about cast iron is that it absorbs and then holds a lot of heat, so it works fine for searing once warm enough.
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#42
Quote from LegoRockets
:
14" is kinda too big for most of the folks. It may not fit your standard stove top. At least that's what my experience is. I have a 14" wok and 12". 12" works and fits perfectly
I disagree. I cook Uzbek plov in my 14 inch cast iron wok, and I can't use more than 600 grams of rice which is fine only for party of about 6 people.
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#43
Quote from Bgunn925
:
Total culinary noob here, what's the advantage of this over a standard frying pan?
bigger biceps
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#44
For deep frying, it's perfect. Else not practical with wok type stir fry where you have flip the stuff and it's too damn heavy for that.
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#45
Quote from Turdcicle
:
I know this kind of a post is generally discouraged because it's not specifically about this deal, but I just can't keep quiet!

Unless you have a proper heat source, and I've never heard of a home kitchen that has one, don't purchase a wok for your home!

Here's why: Woks work so well in restaurants with a proper heat source because the entire surface gets heated to a very high temperature to cook things quickly and evenly. Only a small portion of the bottom of a wok that sits on top of a typical stove actually gets any heat from the stove, so only a small portion of the food really gets the heat that's needed for a proper stir-fry. Not only that, I'm not aware of any typical home stoves that put out the amount of heat necessary for a proper stir-fry. It's a one-two punch argument for not trying to use a wok for stir-frying at home.

If you look at a wok at a restaurant that properly features wok-style cooking, you'll notice the entire wok sits inside a cavity that's blast heated to heat its entire surface to a very high heat. Make sense? For home stir-frying, you're best off using something that's the opposite of a wok -- a frying pan with a very flat bottom to give the food inside the pan that most direct heat contact possible -- and turn that heat up as high as possible when you cook!
Some people recommend a flat stainless skillet for just the reasons you mention. I don't think that's bad advice. But I've found that if I stiry fry in small batches (i.e., fry peppers, then remove, fry carrots, then remove, then meat in maybe two batches) I get a pretty good stir fry. Not a blast furnace stir fry like in Chinese restaurants, but decent enough. Plus, the nonstick qualities of a seasoned wok are way better than a stainless skillet. And my wok does an awesome job with scrambled eggs, etc. So it's not a waste of space or money, at least for me.
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