Sorry, this deal has expired. Get notified of deals like this in the future. Add Deal Alert for this Item
Frontpage Deal

14" AmazonBasics Pre-Seasoned Cast Iron Wok Pan EXPIRED

$26.60
$31.38
+ Free Shipping
+24 Deal Score
18,751 Views
Amazon has 14" AmazonBasics Pre-Seasoned Cast Iron Wok Pan on sale for $26.61. Shipping is free. Thanks Corwin
Share
Good deal?
You gave thanks to Corwin for this post.
Thank you!
Corwin posted this deal. Say thanks!

Original Post

Written by
Edited October 9, 2019 at 01:06 AM by
If you purchase something through a post on our site, Slickdeals may get a small share of the sale.
Deal
Score
+24
18,751 Views
$26.60
$31.38
Don't have Amazon Prime? Students can get a free 6-Month Amazon Prime trial with free 2-day shipping, unlimited video streaming & more. If you're not a student, there's also a free 1-Month Amazon Prime trial available.

63 Comments

1 2 3 4 5

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jun 2008
L3: Novice
102 Posts
43 Reputation
Our community has rated this post as helpful. If you agree, why not thank ?
#46
We have used a cast iron wok for over 25 years. It was a wedding gift, so we were grateful for it and didn't know about carbon steel anyways.

Regardless, we have used it mostly for cooking the ingredients for eggrolls (like veggies and pork) and fried rice. It gets crazy hot. Not the fastest to heat up, but it holds its heat really well. It's really nice because the center stays super hot but the sides maintain different temperatures so we can flash fry something and then move it out of the way (up the wok wall) and cook something else.

The other thing it excels at is general deep frying--chicken wings, donuts, funnel cakes, etc. It doesn't cool down too much between batches, which makes the frying go quicker. Normally you fry a batch of whatever, and then it takes several minutes to heat back up to the right temp.

Using it like a traditional wok where you lift and move it to flip the food is really difficult (even harder with ours because it has just a single long handle). However, we just use the bamboo spoon and spatula to move the food around quickly. It works just fine. My daughter-in-law is Chinese and she says it all tastes great, fwiw!
Reply Helpful Comment? 3 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Oct 2014
L2: Beginner
83 Posts
30 Reputation
#47
Quote from zakoh
:
I disagree. I have a 14 inch cast iron wok and it works perfectly on gas stovetop. My stovetop does have a burner with two rings. Even if your stove has regular burners, this wok should work fine. The good thing about cast iron is that it absorbs and then holds a lot of heat, so it works fine for searing once warm enough.
I understand your disagreement, and I have several cast iron pots and pans and even plates that I love using, but consider this: When it comes to stir-frying, direct-contact heat under the entire cooking surface is much better than a cast iron wok's radiant heat from a small direct-contact surface. The food that needs the hottest possible direct-contact heat just doesn't happen in any type of wok on a regular home cooking stove. The direct-heat contact comes from only a small part of the entire surface.

Cast iron is great for evening out heat, but there's still quite a difference in temperature between the small part of the wok that actually contacts the stove and the part that doesn't -- which, because of a wok's shape, is most of the entire vessel! A proper stir-fry needs as much of that direct-contact heat as possible and that heat needs to be HOT! That's why the blast heat under a properly sunk-in wok works so well at restaurants, but not at home. It's also why a wide-bottom, flat frying pan works best for stir-frying at home. You get much more of that necessary direct-contact heat on the cooking surface.

I'm certainly not suggesting this wok doesn't cook food. I'm suggesting stir-frying at home is better accomplished with what you might already own. Just don't hold back on that heat! Oh -- and don't stir-fry in a pan with a non-stick coating. The coating burns toxins into you food at the temperature you should use to stir-fry.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Nov 2006
L2: Beginner
70 Posts
22 Reputation
#48
Quote from zxnm
:
I bought one with strawberry flavor
yeah ! ... strawberry is the best !
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Oct 2014
L2: Beginner
83 Posts
30 Reputation
#49
Quote from BenjaminY9066
:
Some people recommend a flat stainless skillet for just the reasons you mention. I don't think that's bad advice. But I've found that if I stiry fry in small batches (i.e., fry peppers, then remove, fry carrots, then remove, then meat in maybe two batches) I get a pretty good stir fry. Not a blast furnace stir fry like in Chinese restaurants, but decent enough. Plus, the nonstick qualities of a seasoned wok are way better than a stainless skillet. And my wok does an awesome job with scrambled eggs, etc. So it's not a waste of space or money, at least for me.
Very good points! Everything you wrote makes perfect sense!

I've never thought of using a wok for anything but stir-fry. I wonder how it'd do with omlets?
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined May 2007
L3: Novice
276 Posts
37 Reputation
#50
Does anyone here has any experience in deep frying in this wok ?
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jun 2016
L2: Beginner
77 Posts
42 Reputation
#51
Quote from emaij
:
So what's the obvious result? I don't want to buy both.
In my personal experience of 20 years cooking, with electrical range or gas stove like average American families have, carbon steel wok heats up fast, but cannot provide sustained high heat for longer than 10 seconds once cool/cold ingredients are tossed in. Flipping with a carbon steel wok like some people claimed is just a joke.
With a cast ion wok, or even a cast iron skillet, I can easily complete a stir fry dish within a minute on very high heat from the cast iron itself. That being said, the flavor might not beat restaurant rocket burner + steel wok, but reasonably close.

It does not make sense to argue what material a traditional wok should be made of, or how to flip/toss with a lightweight wok. The point of the this deal is to provide and introduce this effective tool to those who want to achieve the best stir fry experience with the regular home stoves.

Adding this: unlike cast iron or carbon steel, stainless steel does not remain seasoned. Avoid it especially for egg, fish or starchy frying.
Reply Helpful Comment? 2 0
Last edited by garycook October 9, 2019 at 11:19 AM.
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Oct 2013
L3: Novice
186 Posts
62 Reputation
#52
Quote from bobz
:
Does anyone here has any experience in deep frying in this wok ?
Takes time to heat oil but good result when ready for deep fry
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Nov 2005
L4: Apprentice
327 Posts
147 Reputation
#53
Quote from jedimasterraven
:
Thanks! Been looking at buying one - hopefully this one holds up well. In for one.
Have had this one for many years. Works great but to get the best you have to sand down the surface a little smoother and re-season it. Then it is a truly maintenance free non-stick.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Aug 2006
L3: Novice
101 Posts
30 Reputation
#54
I purchased one of these a while back but didn't like it. A few reasons:

1. If you want it ripping hot, the pre-heat can burn off the seasoning, meaning rust if you don't re-season. I just used soybean oil so other oils might work better.

2. The surface is really rough unlike a traditional wok which is mirror smooth. This meant a lot of sticking for certain foods despite many seasoning layers.

3. It's too heavy. I couldn't toss the food, and had to scoop it out instead of tipping the wok, which was difficult.

3. It seemed to stay hotter than a traditional wok but since I couldn't toss and due to the other disadvantages above, I don't think it was worth it. You definitely aren't getting any wok hei. Better to get a outdoor propane burner if you wan't the authentic experience.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Nov 2005
L4: Apprentice
327 Posts
147 Reputation
#55
Quote from Turdcicle
:
It's also why a wide-bottom, flat frying pan works best for stir-frying at home. You get much more of that necessary direct-contact heat on the cooking surface.
Stir frying is best done in a round wok because the little bit of oil/sauce etc is at the bottom and you can keep turning the food over and frying it. The flat bottom requires more oil/sauce and makes the dish soggy or you don't get enough frying/sauce and the dish isn't as tasty.

I have this wok, it heats up just fine and heat goes up so the sides do get heated just fine and it gets plenty hot. I love making fried dumplings in this thing. Take your frozen dumplings, line them up in the bottom of the wok, put in enough water to cover about 1/3 of the bottom. Add a tablespoon or so of cooking oil and steam, covered (I stole an old cover from a teflon wok that wore out) until the water is gone, then the oil crisps the bottom, just tilt wok to coat all the dumplings and you'll get a nice crispy bottom =)
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Dec 2007
L6: Expert
1,282 Posts
379 Reputation
#56
Quote from Turdcicle
:
A wok's shape allows for only a small amount of direct contact with the heat source on a home stove. !
That is the entire point of the wok. You're meant to move your food in and out of direct heat (via stirring or tossing) to get results that are not really possible (or extremely difficult) with a flat bottom pan.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Apr 2009
L2: Beginner
85 Posts
12 Reputation
#57
Quote from MrMotorOil
:
Have had this one for many years. Works great but to get the best you have to sand down the surface a little smoother and re-season it. Then it is a truly maintenance free non-stick.
I appreciate the tip. I'll do that tonight - did you use steel wool or medium sand paper?
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Mar 2013
L4: Apprentice
421 Posts
62 Reputation
#58
Quote from FHRITP
:
Are you your biggest fan?
Huh??
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Oct 2014
L2: Beginner
83 Posts
30 Reputation
#59
Quote from MrMotorOil
:
Stir frying is best done in a round wok because the little bit of oil/sauce etc is at the bottom and you can keep turning the food over and frying it. The flat bottom requires more oil/sauce and makes the dish soggy or you don't get enough frying/sauce and the dish isn't as tasty.

I have this wok, it heats up just fine and heat goes up so the sides do get heated just fine and it gets plenty hot. I love making fried dumplings in this thing. Take your frozen dumplings, line them up in the bottom of the wok, put in enough water to cover about 1/3 of the bottom. Add a tablespoon or so of cooking oil and steam, covered (I stole an old cover from a teflon wok that wore out) until the water is gone, then the oil crisps the bottom, just tilt wok to coat all the dumplings and you'll get a nice crispy bottom =)
I like what you do with your wok -- sounds great for dumplings! And I whole-heartedly agree with you that a wok's shape is its strong point for stir-frying. The wok was invented to properly stir-fry, so it's perfect for that! My point is that a wok doesn't work well at home because you can't get enough blasting-hot heat up the sides on a typical home stove -- and that heat is absolutely needed the whole way around its surface for the best stir-fry -- not just a small portion at the bottom center!

I do have a wok that I've abandoned after I learned it's not the best tool for the job at home. It needs the specialized equipment and conditions a good restaurant has to work correctly. I now use a wide, flat frying pan to stir-fry instead and I get better results. I can no longer use quite as much oil as can be used in wok because of the soggy-factor, which is a shame, but it's the best I can do at home.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Aug 2009
L10: Grand Master
7,645 Posts
1,030 Reputation
#60
Quote from StueyG09
:
Woks are made to be lifted and the food tossed, it works air into the process and to be honest, this is too heavy to use properly. There is good science behind why you'd use a wok though, but I'd suggest carbon steel.
Which the average home cook doesnt need to do nor should they. Just toss the food with a curved spatula or tongs.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Page 4 of 5
1 2 3 4 5
Join the Conversation
Add a Comment
 
Copyright 1999 - 2019. Slickdeals, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Copyright / Infringement Policy  •  Privacy Policy  •  Terms of Service  •  Acceptable Use Policy (Rules)  •  Interest-Based Ads
Link Copied to Clipboard