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Craftsman Dr. Beam Style Torque Wrench: 3/8" 0-75 ft. lb $14, 1/2" 0-150 ft. lb

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Sears.com has select Craftsman Dr. Beam Style Torque Wrenches on sale listed below. Select free store pickup where available otherwise shipping fees apply. Thanks EditorWikiM4742

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Features separate english and metric scales.

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Like others said, it depends on your car and what you are working on. Lug nuts are usually the highest torque use most people have, and those can vary from 70's to 150 or more depending on the vehicle. Check your car's specific specs. Axel nuts and such also need higher torque wrenches.

You usually want two: A low torque and a high torque. You want torque wrenches where your application falls in the middle 80% of the wrench's torque range. This is where most wrenches are made to hold their calibration. So don't use a 0-150 for a 150 ft/lb lugnut, or a 20-250 for a 25 ft/lb fastener. Plus it would be a pain to try to use a huge 250 ft/lb 1/2" wrench on a small fastener in a tight spot.
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There is almost always a coupon to get the HF click-type wrenches for $10 each: https://www.hfqpdb.com/best_coupo...E+WRENCHES

They are surprisingly good quality if you get a good one, however they have sketchy quality control so check them before using them on something important.

I clamp a large allen wrench to my benchtop with the short end hanging over enough for a socket to fit. Then hang a known weight from the wrench (held horizontally) and slide it down the length of the wrench until it clicks. Multiply the weight by the distance to get ft-lbs and compare it to the wrench setting. Exchange the wrench or adjust it if necessary.
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#3
if I didn't have one of these already I would buy this one.
my favorite thing about them is that you can always bend the marker back to shape so it should last you basically forever.
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#4
If I don't have any torque wrenches at all, is this what I should get for working on my car? For some reason, I was under the impression that I needed a 0-250 ft. lbs. set, but I honestly have no idea
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Quote from TheBliz
:
If I don't have any torque wrenches at all, is this what I should get for working on my car? For some reason, I was under the impression that I needed a 0-250 ft. lbs. set, but I honestly have no idea
Probably depends in what you're doing. I'm pretty certain the only thing I've ever had to use more than 100 for was my axle nut, and that was around 130 or so. I've done lots of work to my car including suspension work and never needed more.
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#6
Quote from ShiZero
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Probably depends in what you're doing. I'm pretty certain the only thing I've ever had to use more than 100 for was my axle nut, and that was around 130 or so. I've done lots of work to my car including suspension work and never needed more.
And strut bar
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#7
Quote from TheBliz
:
If I don't have any torque wrenches at all, is this what I should get for working on my car? For some reason, I was under the impression that I needed a 0-250 ft. lbs. set, but I honestly have no idea
Like others said, it depends on your car and what you are working on. Lug nuts are usually the highest torque use most people have, and those can vary from 70's to 150 or more depending on the vehicle. Check your car's specific specs. Axel nuts and such also need higher torque wrenches.

You usually want two: A low torque and a high torque. You want torque wrenches where your application falls in the middle 80% of the wrench's torque range. This is where most wrenches are made to hold their calibration. So don't use a 0-150 for a 150 ft/lb lugnut, or a 20-250 for a 25 ft/lb fastener. Plus it would be a pain to try to use a huge 250 ft/lb 1/2" wrench on a small fastener in a tight spot.
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#8
Quote from DVDxR
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Like others said, it depends on your car and what you are working on. Lug nuts are usually the highest torque use most people have, and those can vary from 70's to 150 or more depending on the vehicle. Check your car's specific specs. Axel nuts and such also need higher torque wrenches.

You usually want two: A low torque and a high torque. You want torque wrenches where your application falls in the middle 80% of the wrench's torque range. This is where most wrenches are made to hold their calibration. So don't use a 0-150 for a 150 ft/lb lugnut, or a 20-250 for a 25 ft/lb fastener. Plus it would be a pain to try to use a huge 250 ft/lb 1/2" wrench on a small fastener in a tight spot.
Good info. Btw the beam type op listed doesnt need calibration correct? But what about the other two like the reg and digital one?

Also the beam type seems longer and the dial is in the way unlike the other type.

Edit
Also some manual list lb-ft and ft-lb but both is SAME correct? Lets say the torque wrench is 1 foot and you apply 2 lbs of force then its 1 foot times 2 lbs is same as 2 lbs times 1 foot?

Edit 2:
Also to convert from ft-lb or lb-ft to INCHES, just times it by 12" to get in-lb or lb-in and divide by 12" to get ft-lb or lb-ft correct?
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Last edited by Glee217 October 14, 2019 at 09:49 AM.
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#9
For someone who has been wrenching for years, spend the same money on a click-type from harbor freight.

These beam type are not as accurate.
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Quote from Glee217
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Good info. Btw the beam type op listed doesnt need calibration correct? But what about the other two like the reg and digital one?

Also the beam type seems longer and the dial is in the way unlike the other type.

Edit
Also some manual list lb-ft and ft-lb but both is SAME correct? Lets say the torque wrench is 1 foot and you apply 2 lbs of force then its 1 foot times 2 lbs is same as 2 lbs times 1 foot?

Edit 2:
Also to convert from ft-lb or lb-ft to INCHES, just times it by 12" to get in-lb or lb-in and divide by 12" to get ft-lb or lb-ft correct?
Any wrench should come calibrated. I don't think you can re-calibrate them. They should hold their calibration pretty well unless they are abused. Don't drop them or strike the beam on anything. This can work harden the beam and throw them off.

Yes, those are the same. One thing to look out for on newer cars is torque + angle specs. Many newer cars have specs like "80 ft-lbs plus 90 degrees". These require some extra steps when torquing the fasteners.

Yes, multiply by 12.
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#11
Quote from travisdinosaur
:
For someone who has been wrenching for years, spend the same money on a click-type from harbor freight.

These beam type are not as accurate.
My research led me away from cheap click-type because they lose their calibration so easily.
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Quote from travisdinosaur
:
For someone who has been wrenching for years, spend the same money on a click-type from harbor freight.

These beam type are not as accurate.
Most beam wrenches are +/- 5% or less. That's plenty accurate for a weekend warrior. The biggest downside of these beam wrenches is that you have to be in a spot to look dead-on to prevent parallax errors.
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#13
Quote from mlj2015
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My research led me away from cheap click-type because they lose their calibration so easily.
Yes, they can lose calibration, especially if abused or stored without backing off the spring pressure. On the other hand, they are super easy to check calibration and adjust as necessary.
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Quote from Glee217
:
Good info. Btw the beam type op listed doesnt need calibration correct? But what about the other two like the reg and digital one?

Also the beam type seems longer and the dial is in the way unlike the other type.

Edit
Also some manual list lb-ft and ft-lb but both is SAME correct? Lets say the torque wrench is 1 foot and you apply 2 lbs of force then its 1 foot times 2 lbs is same as 2 lbs times 1 foot?

Edit 2:
Also to convert from ft-lb or lb-ft to INCHES, just times it by 12" to get in-lb or lb-in and divide by 12" to get ft-lb or lb-ft correct?
While I don't know anything about torque wrenches, ft. lbs. are just units [foot*pounds]. While there are conventions on how these units are normally written, they can be rearranged to any order, as long as they are still mathematically(?) the same.

If what I said above is true, then yes, inch pounds are just foot pounds multiplied by 12

Edit: I just saw that your questions were already answered
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Quote from travisdinosaur
:
For someone who has been wrenching for years, spend the same money on a click-type from harbor freight.

These beam type are not as accurate.
I would second this. I don't use mine often but I picked up the 3/8 and 1/2 from Harbor Freight for $10 each. If you're not in a hurry, they go on sale pretty often during the parking lot sale. Plus you may be able to stack a 20%off coupon if you're trying to get the price down.
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