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Lucero LC150Sce Spruce/Sapele Cutaway Acoustic-Electric Classical Guitar

$160
$319.99
+ Free Shipping
+36 Deal Score
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Musician's Friend has Lucero LC150Sce Spruce/Sapele Cutaway Acoustic-Electric Classical Guitar on sale for $159.99. Shipping is free. Thanks rumata13

Note: Expected to Ship 03-13-2020
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Edited March 2, 2020 at 07:01 AM by
I was looking for inexpensive classical guitar and found this higher end Lucero classical guitar for $160, 50% off at Musician's Friend, shipping is free.

This is classical version, the one with nylon strings, normally played without a pick. You get a lot of features typically not found in classical guitars:
- Truss rod for neck adjustment,
- Cutaway design for access to high frets,
- Electronic Fishman build-in tuner,
- Premium Fishman Clasica III preamp - guitar can be plugged into amp or computer.

It also comes with solid spruce top.

Lots of premium features, you typically pay a lot more than $160 for this selection of features.

FEATURES
Striped sapele back and sides
Solid spruce top
Multi-ply wood binding
3-ply rear marquetry strip
Custom rosette
Gold hardware
White Ivoroid Regal tuners
D™Addario ProArte strings
Comfort-cutaway
Fishman Clasica III preamp: 3-band EQ, Phase, Tuner

20 reviews at MF, most are 5 star (16 reviews), 2 four-star.

https://www.musiciansfriend.com/g...Ntt=lucero
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Created 02-14-2020 at 07:26 AM by rumata13
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$160
$319.99

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#16
Quote from ThriftyRoute9490
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This is a pretty good description, but one thing to note is that you wont be able to play this like a metal guitar. Electric acoustics typically can't handle heavy distortion without getting feedback. Just so somebody isn't disappointed when they think they can shred on this as well as play it like an acoustic.
hmm...shredding on a classical guitar...that idea never entered my mind EEK!
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#17
Quote from need
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https://classicalguitarmagazine.c...ectations/ [classicalguitarmagazine.com]

if only I didn't already have guitars that I don't play enough.
that's a different model. This is the 150SCE
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#18
Quote from TealSwing415
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Would this be a good begginer guitar for a 5th grader?
Some things to consider...

Classical guitars have more flexible strings that are easier on kiddie fingers.However they have wide necks compared to other types of guitars which means more of a stretch for small fingers. Others can chime in but I assume that for most older youngsters (10+) the former outweighs the latter.

For this specific guitar, looking thru the reviews on various sites, I see multiple reports of the guitar needing work to set it up right. This includes filing fret ends and adjusting the neck to remove buzz. If you aren't handy then taking this guitar to a tech will wipe out any savings you might make here.

When starting to learn the guitar it is SUPER important to get a guitar that sounds good and plays nicely. If you don't have both of these you are more likely to pack it in. It doesn't mean that you have to spend a lot of money, you just need to know what you're buying. Buying something online just because it's cheap, probably isn't a good idea.

My first guitar (many many years ago) was a $100 Suzuki acoustic which was cheap but that was a great sounding guitar with lovely action. Right now I have a Washburn acoustic electric (steel string) that I got from Amazon for $180 that is an order of magnitude better than this one. I recently bought a Kremona Verea electric acoustic (nylon string) from MF for $450 - man, it is sweet!
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Last edited by MadPup February 14, 2020 at 06:25 PM.
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#19
Quote from MadPup
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Some things to consider...

Classical guitars have more flexible strings that are easier on kiddie fingers.However they have wide necks compared to other types of guitars which means more of a stretch for small fingers. Others can chime in but I assume that for most youngsters the former outweighs the latter.

For this specific guitar, looking thru the reviews on various sites, I see multiple reports of the guitar needing work to set it up right. This includes filing fret ends and adjusting the neck to remove buzz. If you aren't handy then taking this guitar to a tech will wipe out any savings you might make here.

When starting to learn the guitar it is SUPER important to get a guitar that sounds good and plays nicely. If you don't have both of these you are more likely to pack it in. It doesn't mean that you have to spend a lot of money, you just need to know what you're buying. Buying something online just because it's cheap, probably isn't a good idea.

My first guitar (many many years ago) was a $100 Suzuki acoustic which was cheap but that was a great sounding guitar with lovely action. Right now I have a Washburn acoustic electric (steel string) that I got from Amazon for $180 that is an order of magnitude better than this one. I recently bought a Kremona Verea electric acoustic (nylon string) from MF for $450 - man, it is sweet!
Thank you, will wait for something else...missed the mini martin...what model os the washburn?
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Last edited by TealSwing415 February 14, 2020 at 06:34 PM.
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#20
Quote from TealSwing415
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Would this be a good begginer guitar for a 5th grader?
It's better than a guitar for beginners!
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#21
If you want to teach a young kid proper technique, acoustic is the way to go. Nylon strings are easier on the fingers, more durable (they don't rust/corrode and don't break very easily), etc. If the child is small, or has small hands, consider a 3/4 size guitar (these are actually generally more expensive, though, probably because they don't make nearly as many in this size).

To those commenting on acoustic electrics...nylon guitars use a microphone or microphone-like pickup, which senses actual acoustic sounds/vibrations. This makes them prone to feedback when used with high-gain amplifiers, etc., and is not what they are intended for. The built-in pickups are for making it louder while still sounding natural, through an amp. Basically, like using a microphone, but it's inside the guitar's body or in the bridge, and designed to be unobtrusive and minimize unwanted sounds.

True electric guitars use metal strings with magnetic pickups. These sense the vibration of the strings (and the strings only), and as such, the only feedback they typically pickup is that which excites the actual strings. This is what gives an electric guitar it's tone, and allows it to have that "metal" sound. These come in the passive (unpowered, the string vibration excites a magnetic field) and active (powered, similar to passive but can have better sustain, and have a much higher gain output, because an active pickup senses disturbances in an electric current flowing through it, instead of relying on the string to induce the current). You have to remember to unplug the audio cable from an active pickup guitar when you are not using it, as this is what turns power on and will drain your battery. Electric guitars are fun and can provide a lot of different sounds, but they can also distract a beginning guitarist, and cover up sloppy technique, etc. They also often have tremolos that can make them finicky to setup and tune.

There are also a very small number of guitars out there with optical pickups, that "see" the strings vibrate...I have never played one, but would love to try it out.

I still have the classical guitar I learned on, and it still plays wonderfully, as well as many newer higher-end classical guitars. The fretboard is very well worn in, but the frets themselves are in great shape (nylon is easy on the frets like that Smilie ). This is probably a solid deal, and the cutaway is nice if you like to play music that's all over the fretboard.
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Last edited by LaughinGass February 15, 2020 at 04:08 PM.
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#22
Just got back from my local guitar center cause I wanted to try this out in person and I know they price match MF. Anyway, besides not being impressed with the sound (natural, I didn't amplify it), the frets were all sticking out past the neck slightly, which resulted in a ton of small cuts to the outside of my index finger as I played. It wasn't painful or anything, just uncomfortable after several minutes. If you've ever tried to open a pop off bottle cap like it's a twist off, the cuts felt and looked kinda like that. One of the bad reviews online (can't remember if it was on GC or MF) mentioned this as well. I suppose I could've asked a clerk to pull several from the back for me in the hopes that I'd find one without this issue, but after being less than impressed with the sound, I didn't wanna waste my time. Just my .02
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#23
Quote from ripper415
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Just got back from my local guitar center cause I wanted to try this out in person and I know they price match MF. Anyway, besides not being impressed with the sound (natural, I didn't amplify it), the frets were all sticking out past the neck slightly, which resulted in a ton of small cuts to the outside of my index finger as I played. It wasn't painful or anything, just uncomfortable after several minutes. If you've ever tried to open a pop off bottle cap like it's a twist off, the cuts felt and looked kinda like that. One of the bad reviews online (can't remember if it was on GC or MF) mentioned this as well. I suppose I could've asked a clerk to pull several from the back for me in the hopes that I'd find one without this issue, but after being less than impressed with the sound, I didn't wanna waste my time. Just my .02
I also went to GC last night to check this guitar and to me it looked perfect. Frets were finished well and not sticking out. I liked the build too.

Perhaps you looked at the one that's been on display for a while and had wood dried out, causing fret ends to stick out?
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#24
Quote from ThriftyRoute9490
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This is a pretty good description, but one thing to note is that you wont be able to play this like a metal guitar. Electric acoustics typically can't handle heavy distortion without getting feedback. Just so somebody isn't disappointed when they think they can shred on this as well as play it like an acoustic.
To add, this is because the pickups in most electroacoustics are piezoelectric pickups, and electrics have magnetic pickups. They're completely different in the way they pick up the sound and also sound different. Piezo pickups are in direct contact with the strings and require a preamp and battery (usually embedded in the guitar body). This also allows for some advantages like having an integrated tuner (like this one in the OP). However, for an acoustic, electro- or not, a mic is always the most natural sounding amplification method, especially for nylon string guitars.
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#25
Quote from AndyO9110
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To add, this is because the pickups in most electroacoustics are piezoelectric pickups, and electrics have magnetic pickups. They're completely different in the way they pick up the sound and also sound different. Piezo pickups are in direct contact with the strings and require a preamp and battery (usually embedded in the guitar body). This also allows for some advantages like having an integrated tuner (like this one in the OP). However, for an acoustic, electro- or not, a mic is always the most natural sounding amplification method, especially for nylon string guitars.
Microhpones are also often piezoelectric. All that means is they use a crystal which modulates an electric signal based on how hard it is compressed. A microphone basically uses a simulated eardrum in conjunction with a strut to compress the crystal. No guitar I've ever seen puts the pickups in direct contact with the strings. They are typically glued under the saddle in the bridge, and effectively pressed against it by string tension. The front of the guitar, which is also the emitter of its sound, vibrates and compresses the crystal.
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#26
Quote from LaughinGass
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Microhpones are also often piezoelectric. All that means is they use a crystal which modulates an electric signal based on how hard it is compressed. A microphone basically uses a simulated eardrum in conjunction with a strut to compress the crystal. No guitar I've ever seen puts the pickups in direct contact with the strings. They are typically glued under the saddle in the bridge, and effectively pressed against it by string tension. The front of the guitar, which is also the emitter of its sound, vibrates and compresses the crystal.
Ah yeah I just meant that there's no air gap between the pickup and the string like with a magnetic one.
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#27
Quote from ripper415
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Just got back from my local guitar center cause I wanted to try this out in person and I know they price match MF. Anyway, besides not being impressed with the sound (natural, I didn't amplify it), the frets were all sticking out past the neck slightly, which resulted in a ton of small cuts to the outside of my index finger as I played. It wasn't painful or anything, just uncomfortable after several minutes. If you've ever tried to open a pop off bottle cap like it's a twist off, the cuts felt and looked kinda like that. One of the bad reviews online (can't remember if it was on GC or MF) mentioned this as well. I suppose I could've asked a clerk to pull several from the back for me in the hopes that I'd find one without this issue, but after being less than impressed with the sound, I didn't wanna waste my time. Just my .02
Another point with cutaway style classicals is they typically are much quieter, and a little slimmer. This makes them more portable and easier to play, and you need to use them with an amp to get much volume.
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#28
Quote from rumata13
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I also went to GC last night to check this guitar and to me it looked perfect. Frets were finished well and not sticking out. I liked the build too.

Perhaps you looked at the one that's been on display for a while and had wood dried out, causing fret ends to stick out?
Yes, it was on display in the "acoustic room". I'd assume that since there are $10k+ worth of guitars in there that they'd have the humidity controlled to where that wouldn't be an issue. Also, I checked the other 15 or so classical guitars they had on display in that same section of the room and none of them had frets sticking out anything close to what the Lucero did. I'm chalking it up to a sub par guitar and/or sub par quality control. Either way, that's enough to convince me not to buy it
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#29
Quote from rumata13
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I also went to GC last night to check this guitar and to me it looked perfect. Frets were finished well and not sticking out. I liked the build too.

Perhaps you looked at the one that's been on display for a while and had wood dried out, causing fret ends to stick out?
I see other reviews that say the same. I guess it's also possible the QA is spotty on these. Maybe the rough ones are "Friday guitars".
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#30
A fret file and some painter tape to protect the neck is all you need to smooth rough edges, if any.
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