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500GB Western Digital Blue SN550 NVMe M.2 2280 PCIe Solid State Drive EXPIRED

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Newegg has 500GB Western Digital Blue SN550 NVMe M.2 2280 PCIe Solid State Drive (WDS500G2B0C) for $64.99 - $5 w/ promo code 93XPH27 = $59.99. Shipping is free. Thanks sr71
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Edited March 24, 2020 at 10:28 PM by
w/code 93XPH27

https://www.newegg.com/western-di...6820250134

starts 3/25 PT
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#16
Quote from awedi
:
Same question. Can I install it into my 2014 MB Pro?
Nope, check out OWC or Macmall for replacements or upgrades. I think there are adapters out there? But I wouldn't go down that rabbit hole personally.

https://forums.macrumors.com/thre...e.2034976/
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Last edited by nhttri March 25, 2020 at 07:30 AM.
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#17
Puts it at price parity to the 1TB model, but the 1TB SN550 has gone up in price since it's release in October due to the NAND price increase and some pandemic pricing killing availability.

The SN550 is a DRAMless drive with a 5yr warranty. The EX900 is cheaper at $0.115/GB, but it's a 1TB model. The QLC drives are all cheaper, of course, but you can't get those at quantities less than 1TB due to QLC reliability.

So good deal for anyone that wants to spend as little as possible to get the speed benefit of an nvme drive and still get a good value.
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#18
The higher end Adata are a better deal than the lower end WD.

Or the XPG Pro like this one for $20 more

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07K1HMMJC
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Last edited by WingsOfF March 25, 2020 at 08:20 AM.
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#19
This is not bad. I got the 1TB one with the AmEx reward 20% discount at Amazon for $80 only though.
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#20
If your PC can take an NVME the you're going to get much better performance with this than a SATA SSD but the WD "Black Series" SN750 will still be much faster. But you may or may not notice depending on what you do.

If you have a student discount this costs about $55 direct from WD.
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#21
The only target market I see for this is an upgrade from a non-gaming laptop or desktop which came with a 128/256GB m.2 ssd.

It requires an m.2 nvme slot (or a pcie adapter which makes the total price not a good value) which means a relatively new laptop or desktop which likely came with a nvme card but a lower capacity. If they came with nvme 500gb or higher, then this is not going to be a noticeable upgrade (and may even be worse).

Don't see too many likely scenarios where a SATA ssd would be replaced by this where the performance difference would be most significant.

Puzzled at the target market for this.
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#22
Quote from WingsOfF
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The only target market I see for this is an upgrade from a non-gaming laptop or desktop which came with a 128/256GB m.2 ssd.

It requires an m.2 nvme slot (or a pcie adapter which makes the total price not a good value) which means a relatively new laptop or desktop which likely came with a nvme card but a lower capacity. If they came with nvme 500gb or higher, then this is not going to be a noticeable upgrade (and may even be worse).

Don't see too many likely scenarios where a SATA ssd would be replaced by this where the performance difference would be most significant.

Puzzled at the target market for this.
If you bought a mobo within the last several years, you'd have an m.2 slot. You may not have bought an NVME at that time, since you could re-use your SATA drive. You may finally be building it now, or could upgrade to NVME onto the board, so you can use the SATA drive elsewhere. I stockpile plenty of M.2 drives, both in SATA version and NVME depending on the customer/person that will use it.
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#23
Quote from WingsOfF
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The only target market I see for this is an upgrade from a non-gaming laptop or desktop which came with a 128/256GB m.2 ssd.

It requires an m.2 nvme slot (or a pcie adapter which makes the total price not a good value) which means a relatively new laptop or desktop which likely came with a nvme card but a lower capacity. If they came with nvme 500gb or higher, then this is not going to be a noticeable upgrade (and may even be worse).

Don't see too many likely scenarios where a SATA ssd would be replaced by this where the performance difference would be most significant.

Puzzled at the target market for this.
Youre not neccessarily wrong, but this ssd is one of those newer tech flash drives. Even being dramless, this thing is actually faster than many other higher end ssds in general OS use, Game loading, latency etc.. Many people dont know that.

So, it is a difficult sell when it is such a small price difference with some higher end ssds, but SN550 does have more value in the 1TB area, rather than the 500gb area. I am not sure I would buy a SN550 in the 500gb zone....

With that said, the SN550 is actually as fast or faster than, lets say WD SN750 or Samsung 970 evo plus in like game loading and overall general OS use. Fyi. So, its use would be a cheap gaming drive to answer that question.

Heres a quick benchmark... https://www.tweaktown.com/reviews...ndex5.html
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Last edited by EffinAhole March 25, 2020 at 10:41 AM.
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#24
Quote from WingsOfF
:
The higher end Adata are a better deal than the lower end WD.

Or the XPG Pro like this one for $20 more

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07K1HMMJC
I love my sx8200 pros. They are in all my rigs, and work great as a teir-2 cache drive!! They frequently go on sale for $60 too!!
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#25
Quote from WingsOfF
:
The only target market I see for this is an upgrade from a non-gaming laptop or desktop which came with a 128/256GB m.2 ssd.

It requires an m.2 nvme slot (or a pcie adapter which makes the total price not a good value) which means a relatively new laptop or desktop which likely came with a nvme card but a lower capacity. If they came with nvme 500gb or higher, then this is not going to be a noticeable upgrade (and may even be worse).

Don't see too many likely scenarios where a SATA ssd would be replaced by this where the performance difference would be most significant.

Puzzled at the target market for this.
Maybe the millions of computers shipped since roughly Skylake with the bog-standard 256GB SATA M.2 config? Maybe every new computer today that still ships with the bog-standard 256GB M.2 (either SATA or NVMe) config? Maybe every single new DIY PC build? And I'm not sure why you segment out "non-gaming". This thing is plenty fast for a gaming machine. In regular usage you won't even notice the difference between SATA/NVMe, and the difference between this NVMe and something like a Phison E12 based drive even less so. People need to get over peak sequential numbers, they mean almost nothing in day-to-day use unless you are copying enormous files all day every day that will exceed the cache's ability to keep up. And even then you'd have to be doing it to another equally fast drive that's connected with an extremely fast interconnect.

https://www.tweaktown.com/reviews...index.html

https://www.tomshardware.com/revi...ss-ssd-yet

"WD's Blue SN550 is one of the most consistent performing low-cost NVMe SSDs available. Even though it has a small SLC write cache, when you hammer it with heavy writes, its slowest performance will still remain acceptable. In our testing, it even manages to respond faster to applications and most consumer workloads than the WD Black SN750, including loading up your favorite games."

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#26
Two questions for the experts.
- How do I clone my current drive to this one? I have the tools to clone a regular SATA drive. Can that be used?
- how do I know if my desktop supports this drive? I have a HP PC from 2014
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#27
Quote from gonepostl
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I love my sx8200 pros. They are in all my rigs, and work great as a teir-2 cache drive!! They frequently go on sale for $60 too!!
You are correct to assume sx8200 is a much better buy at $60. Dramless drives often choke and stutter just like Spinning harddrives.

Dramless drives are trash tier. There's absolutely no reason to buy them when drives W/ dram can be had for the same price and sometimes lower.

The only reason they've been created is so large builders like Dell can save a on ignorant consumers who think 1TB is 1TB, regardless of quality/speed/endurance.
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Last edited by xtp March 25, 2020 at 11:13 AM.
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#28
Quote from vo_danh
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If you bought a mobo within the last several years, you'd have an m.2 slot. You may not have bought an NVME at that time, since you could re-use your SATA drive. You may finally be building it now, or could upgrade to NVME onto the board, so you can use the SATA drive elsewhere. I stockpile plenty of M.2 drives, both in SATA version and NVME depending on the customer/person that will use it.
First, the DIY market is relatively very small and second within that market, MBs with a NVME capable slot (not just SATA m.2) but only a SATA ssd used is even smaller and within that the number of people that would want to make the jump to the 500GB rather than a larger is even more smaller and within that, people who wouldn't get a mid-tier or high-end for some 10s of dollars more is infinitesimally small. I can understand it from the viewpoint of someone building units for sale to customers - buy the cheapest you can where the customer won't know the difference for higher margins.

Quote from EffinAhole
:
So, it is a difficult sell when it is such a small price difference with some higher end ssds, but SN550 does have more value in the 1TB area, rather than the 500gb area. I am not sure I would buy a SN550 in the 500gb zone....
I agree with the 1tb of this series being the sweet spot if the performance/dollar is justified. 500gb is typically an interim solution for an older computer or one goes for the best performance they can afford rather than settle for lower (or the brand name which is an advantage for WD) where the write speeds can really suffer for larger files even if occasionally done. Not for a $10-$20 difference. This is why I don't get the positioning of this.

Quote from johnny_5.0
:
Maybe the millions of computers shipped since roughly Skylake with the bog-standard 256GB SATA M.2 config? Maybe every new computer today that still ships with the bog-standard 256GB M.2 (either SATA or NVMe) config? Maybe every single new DIY PC build? And I'm not sure why you segment out "non-gaming". This thing is plenty fast for a gaming machine. In regular usage you won't even notice the difference between SATA/NVMe, and the difference between this NVMe and something like a Phison E12 based drive even less so.
See first reply above. I left out gaming because people buying gaming rigs or building them aren't going to skimp over $10s of dollars for an SSD whose price is in the noise compared to how much they will be spending for the rest. Second, 500GB isn't enough to keep much of the gaming apps on the SSD. The weakness of this drive is sustained write speed, say if you were downloading/copying large gaming files.

I get there are a few applications but don't see a market waiting for this at this price/performance trade-off. Either move down in price or move up in performance.
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#29
Quote from xtp
:
You are correct to assume sx8200 is a much better buy at $60. Dramless drives often choke and stutter just like Spinning harddrives.

Dramless drives are trash tier. There's absolutely no reason to buy them when drives W/ dram can be had for the same price and sometimes lower.

The only reason they've been created is so large builders like Dell can save a on ignorant consumers who think 1TB is 1TB, regardless of quality/speed/endurance.
Quote from xtp
:
You are correct to assume sx8200 is a much better buy at $60. Dramless drives often choke and stutter just like Spinning harddrives.

Dramless drives are trash tier. There's absolutely no reason to buy them when drives W/ dram can be had for the same price and sometimes lower.

The only reason they've been created is so large builders like Dell can save a on ignorant consumers who think 1TB is 1TB, regardless of quality/speed/endurance.
You'll be astonished to know that technology advances. We all hated TLC in the beginning, and now it is the norm even for enterprise drives and nobody is complaining about performance. QLC will likewise take over from TLC in the near term and we'll all hate that at first too.

The first DRAMless drives drives were indeed quite inferior for medium or heavy loads. I have a 240GB Toshiba RC100 that I bought to stick in a WWAN slot (it was the only 2242 length NVMe drive when it debuted). But this SN550 is worlds better. Instead of taking any random person's uneducated opinion about it, people can just go and read actual hardware reviews.

https://www.tweaktown.com/reviews...ndex7.html

https://www.tomshardware.com/revi...-ssd-yet/3

"WD's Blue SN550 is one of the most consistent performing low-cost NVMe SSDs available. Even though it has a small SLC write cache, when you hammer it with heavy writes, its slowest performance will still remain acceptable. In our testing, it even manages to respond faster to applications and most consumer workloads than the WD Black SN750, including loading up your favorite games."
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#30
Quote from johnny_5.0
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You'll be astonished to know that technology advances. We all hated TLC in the beginning"WD's Blue SN550 is one of the most consistent performing low-cost NVMe SSDs available. Even though it has a small SLC write cache, when you hammer it with heavy writes, its slowest performance will still remain acceptable. In our testing, it even manages to respond faster to applications and most consumer workloads than the WD Black SN750, including loading up your favorite games."[/i]
This is NOT the issue.

The problem is that this is badly priced.

SN750, for $7 more just 2 days ago ($67), is 3x as fast for end to end write, w/MUCH lower latency in mixed i/o, and is ~ 50% faster in peak sequential as well.
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