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ProForm 400 SPX Upright Chain Drive Exercise Bike w/ 40lb Flywheel EXPIRED

$227
$299.00
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Walmart.com has ProForm 400 SPX Upright Chain Drive Exercise Bike w/ 40lb Flywheel on sale for $226.80. Shipping is free. Thanks jaydillyo
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Features a 250lb capacity, 40lb flywheel, LCD display and adjustable resistance with a 90-Day parts and labor / 5-year frame warranty. -SaltyOne

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Edited March 26, 2020 at 08:15 AM by
This is the best price that I have seen for this spin bike. I almost bought one, but my S.O. put the kibosh on it for now. I'm pretty sure the previous low I saw for this bike was $299 at Costco. The Costco one was actually the 405, but AFAIK it's the same with a retailer specific model number.

This will help you work out during isolation and free shipping makes this a killer deal IMO.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/ProFor.../914130383
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Just an FYI for anyone looking for long-term reviews on ProForm bikes. They change the model number every year so it's hard to find but you can see reviews for the ProForm 290 SPX [amazon.com] and the ProForm 300 SPX [amazon.com] to get an idea of how these will hold up over time. Most of these bikes in the $300-600 price range are probably constructed exactly the same and they just slap on screens or other "smart" stuff to mark up the price. I'd expect the Costco Tour de France model and the 505/405 to be exactly the same if you can find long-term reviews for those. There's a YouTuber named IrixGuy that has done long-term use videos on the 290 [youtube.com] and 300 [youtube.com] and seems to get about a year's worth of use out of them before something catastrophically fails.

From what I gather it seems to be a rather noisy bike since it's chain drive and the chain has a tendency to rub against the chain guard due to shoddy Chinese manufacturing (not aligning the parts properly and providing enough clearance). You can take the chain guard off and be mindful when assembling the bike to align things the best you can to mitigate this. It doesn't affect the longevity. Belt drive bikes tend to be a lot more quiet but the belt is also a maintenance (wear and tear) item just like timing belts vs timing chains on cars.

The resistance on these bikes are done by two felt pads that rub against the flywheel which is also noisy. The pads also wear out over time (maybe 500-1000 miles?) and get even more noisy. People spray silicone lubricant on them which tends to extend their lifespan but won't make them last forever. I see them lasting around 700-1000 miles if you maintain it with lubricant. Probably less than 500 if you don't, and they will become obscenely noisy well before that. They will eventually have to be replaced and ProForm charges $26 each + shipping for them [fitnessrepairparts.com]. If you spend upwards of $800 you get magnetic resistance which tends to last longer with fewer wearing parts and is much quieter. But look to budget $60/year (~25% of the cost of the bike) for the replacements for these.

From what I've gathered from the ProForm, Sunny, and Exerpeutic bike reviews on Amazon in this price range (40 lb flywheel, chain drive), these bikes have a tendency to fail by the pedal snapping off. The threading where the pedals screw into the crank arm or the crank arm screws into the crank shaft is also probably specced wrong for the amount of force/stress/fatigue these get and tends to strip or get cross threaded after around 7000 miles/70 hours and they charge around $80 for the replacement parts for these. Most people decide to just replace the bike at this point because they probably need to buy 2x of the $30 felt pads at this point also and it'll cost upwards of $140 for repairs. IrixGuy actually had his one of his fail by the chain completely falling off and not being able to be reset since other parts were worn off. The other one failed by the pedal/crank snapping off and being too stripped to reassemble.

If you want these to last the longest, then you should pedal using lower resistance and DO NOT STAND on the pedals. The pedal and crank are the weak point so minimizing stress on it needs to be the priority. If you want a real training bike for simulating outdoor rides, you will not get that in this price range. Look to spend at least $1000. These bikes are just made too cheaply to last with the kind of stress that simulating real outdoor rides will cause. But if you are a more moderate exerciser just looking for indoor exercise while we flatten the curve of COVID-19 then this can be a slick deal if you know how to maintain it.
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What's type of clothing weight capacity is this one rated at?
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#3
What's type of clothing weight capacity is this one rated at?
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Quote from killershroom
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What's type of clothing weight capacity is this one rated at?
i Bike with pounds; shorts over 44.
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How "beginner" of a bike is this? Will one just start using it and be disappointed we didn't get a model better? Thanks
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03-26-2020 at 08:48 AM
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#7
It is hard to find any unbiased reviews on this bike or videos of it in action. A lot of the reviews on various websites are paid...

I am especially interested in how loud the chain drive is.
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#8
Just an FYI for anyone looking for long-term reviews on ProForm bikes. They change the model number every year so it's hard to find but you can see reviews for the ProForm 290 SPX [amazon.com] and the ProForm 300 SPX [amazon.com] to get an idea of how these will hold up over time. Most of these bikes in the $300-600 price range are probably constructed exactly the same and they just slap on screens or other "smart" stuff to mark up the price. I'd expect the Costco Tour de France model and the 505/405 to be exactly the same if you can find long-term reviews for those. There's a YouTuber named IrixGuy that has done long-term use videos on the 290 [youtube.com] and 300 [youtube.com] and seems to get about a year's worth of use out of them before something catastrophically fails.

From what I gather it seems to be a rather noisy bike since it's chain drive and the chain has a tendency to rub against the chain guard due to shoddy Chinese manufacturing (not aligning the parts properly and providing enough clearance). You can take the chain guard off and be mindful when assembling the bike to align things the best you can to mitigate this. It doesn't affect the longevity. Belt drive bikes tend to be a lot more quiet but the belt is also a maintenance (wear and tear) item just like timing belts vs timing chains on cars.

The resistance on these bikes are done by two felt pads that rub against the flywheel which is also noisy. The pads also wear out over time (maybe 500-1000 miles?) and get even more noisy. People spray silicone lubricant on them which tends to extend their lifespan but won't make them last forever. I see them lasting around 700-1000 miles if you maintain it with lubricant. Probably less than 500 if you don't, and they will become obscenely noisy well before that. They will eventually have to be replaced and ProForm charges $26 each + shipping for them [fitnessrepairparts.com]. If you spend upwards of $800 you get magnetic resistance which tends to last longer with fewer wearing parts and is much quieter. But look to budget $60/year (~25% of the cost of the bike) for the replacements for these.

From what I've gathered from the ProForm, Sunny, and Exerpeutic bike reviews on Amazon in this price range (40 lb flywheel, chain drive), these bikes have a tendency to fail by the pedal snapping off. The threading where the pedals screw into the crank arm or the crank arm screws into the crank shaft is also probably specced wrong for the amount of force/stress/fatigue these get and tends to strip or get cross threaded after around 7000 miles/70 hours and they charge around $80 for the replacement parts for these. Most people decide to just replace the bike at this point because they probably need to buy 2x of the $30 felt pads at this point also and it'll cost upwards of $140 for repairs. IrixGuy actually had his one of his fail by the chain completely falling off and not being able to be reset since other parts were worn off. The other one failed by the pedal/crank snapping off and being too stripped to reassemble.

If you want these to last the longest, then you should pedal using lower resistance and DO NOT STAND on the pedals. The pedal and crank are the weak point so minimizing stress on it needs to be the priority. If you want a real training bike for simulating outdoor rides, you will not get that in this price range. Look to spend at least $1000. These bikes are just made too cheaply to last with the kind of stress that simulating real outdoor rides will cause. But if you are a more moderate exerciser just looking for indoor exercise while we flatten the curve of COVID-19 then this can be a slick deal if you know how to maintain it.
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Last edited by ready4ward March 26, 2020 at 09:32 AM.
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#9
Quote from ready4ward
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But if you are a more moderate exerciser just looking for indoor exercise while we flatten the curve of COVID-19 then this can be a slick deal if you know how to maintain it.
Thank you for the indepth review and information!
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#10
Quote from ready4ward
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If you want these to last the longest, then you should pedal using lower resistance
That literally defeats the point of a bike lol.

I was considering buying one, but this makes it a hard pass.
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#11
Check the shipping times on these, gonna be a 3 week wait for me.
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#12
Quote from ready4ward
:
Just an FYI for anyone looking for long-term reviews on ProForm bikes. They change the model number every year so it's hard to find but you can see reviews for the ProForm 290 SPX [amazon.com] and the ProForm 300 SPX [amazon.com] to get an idea of how these will hold up over time. Most of these bikes in the $300-600 price range are probably constructed exactly the same and they just slap on screens or other "smart" stuff to mark up the price. I'd expect the Costco Tour de France model and the 505/405 to be exactly the same if you can find long-term reviews for those. There's a YouTuber named IrixGuy that has done long-term use videos on the 290 [youtube.com] and 300 [youtube.com] and seems to get about a year's worth of use out of them before something catastrophically fails.

From what I gather it seems to be a rather noisy bike since it's chain drive and the chain has a tendency to rub against the chain guard due to shoddy Chinese manufacturing (not aligning the parts properly and providing enough clearance). You can take the chain guard off and be mindful when assembling the bike to align things the best you can to mitigate this. It doesn't affect the longevity. Belt drive bikes tend to be a lot more quiet but the belt is also a maintenance (wear and tear) item just like timing belts vs timing chains on cars.

The resistance on these bikes are done by two felt pads that rub against the flywheel which is also noisy. The pads also wear out over time (maybe 500-1000 miles?) and get even more noisy. People spray silicone lubricant on them which tends to extend their lifespan but won't make them last forever. I see them lasting around 700-1000 miles if you maintain it with lubricant. Probably less than 500 if you don't, and they will become obscenely noisy well before that. They will eventually have to be replaced and ProForm charges $26 each + shipping for them [fitnessrepairparts.com]. If you spend upwards of $800 you get magnetic resistance which tends to last longer with fewer wearing parts and is much quieter. But look to budget $60/year (~25% of the cost of the bike) for the replacements for these.

From what I've gathered from the ProForm, Sunny, and Exerpeutic bike reviews on Amazon in this price range (40 lb flywheel, chain drive), these bikes have a tendency to fail by the pedal snapping off. The threading where the pedals screw into the crank arm or the crank arm screws into the crank shaft is also probably specced wrong for the amount of force/stress/fatigue these get and tends to strip or get cross threaded after around 7000 miles/70 hours and they charge around $80 for the replacement parts for these. Most people decide to just replace the bike at this point because they probably need to buy 2x of the $30 felt pads at this point also and it'll cost upwards of $140 for repairs. IrixGuy actually had his one of his fail by the chain completely falling off and not being able to be reset since other parts were worn off. The other one failed by the pedal/crank snapping off and being too stripped to reassemble.

If you want these to last the longest, then you should pedal using lower resistance and DO NOT STAND on the pedals. The pedal and crank are the weak point so minimizing stress on it needs to be the priority. If you want a real training bike for simulating outdoor rides, you will not get that in this price range. Look to spend at least $1000. These bikes are just made too cheaply to last with the kind of stress that simulating real outdoor rides will cause. But if you are a more moderate exerciser just looking for indoor exercise while we flatten the curve of COVID-19 then this can be a slick deal if you know how to maintain it.
Thanks this is helpful! Any suggestions for bikes around 1k that will be better but not quite peloton expensive?
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#13
Just bought a $80 rear wheel trainer with front wheel block for road bike from Amazon. Are these worth spending so much more for?
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Quote from mark6614
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Thanks this is helpful! Any suggestions for bikes around 1k that will be better but not quite peloton expensive?
Supposedly the reviews I've looked at recommend the Keiser M3.

How does this Proform compare with the Sunny Health ones?
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#15
Bought the Tour de France model around Xmas? When it was on sale. I really love it and the iFit program is very motivating. I have been using it several times a week with zero issues besides a tiny bit of squeaking on the handle bars, and I would also note if you're taller you might want to try this in person to decide whether it's comfortable in the standing position (the handlebars could be higher in my opinion. I would say at this price point for the average user like myself (30 minute sessions some standing) it's perfect for a couple years use.
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