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Rheem 8.4-GPM Liquid Propane High Efficiency Outdoor Tankless Water Heater EXPIRED

$901
$1,126.43
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Home Depot has Rheem Performance Platinum 8.4-GPM Liquid Propane High Efficiency Outdoor Tankless Water Heater (ECOH160XLP-2) on sale for $901.14. Shipping is free. Thanks rsvpd
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Edited April 13, 2020 at 02:49 PM by
Home Depot [homedepot.com] has select Rheem Liquid Propane outdoor tankless water heaters on clearance w/ free shipping.no longer avail
in Large Appliances (5)
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$200.59
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$255.00
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$32.25
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$373.00
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$901
$1,126.43
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Really? They are relatively* common all over. My dad owned a home in Indiana that had an LP tank, as did the homes around him for miles in every direction. Many rural areas use LP as running the infrastructure for NG is hugely cost prohibitive for the area covered and number of customers.

The home still had normal electric, phone, internet, etc, but running and pressurizing miles of NG just for 100 or so homes is just not practical.

"While almost 85% of households in the United States heat with natural gas or electricity, more than 10% rely on heating oil or propane"

10% may not sound like a lot, but that's still 1 in 10 homes in the US. Definitely not just off-grid cabins.
You must not get out much...
I have seen a few here in SE Ohio as a real estate agent. They are on grid but not close to a gas connection and for whatever reason use gas for heating. There are companies here that truck in the gas when low to the house.

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#3
Dang need indoor ng
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04-07-2020 at 09:24 AM
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#5
Quote from WhosUrBuddiee
:
I have never seen a house use LP for heat unless its an off-the grid cabin or something.
I have seen a few here in SE Ohio as a real estate agent. They are on grid but not close to a gas connection and for whatever reason use gas for heating. There are companies here that truck in the gas when low to the house.
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#6
Quote from WhosUrBuddiee
:
I have never seen a house use LP for heat unless its an off-the grid cabin or something.
Really? They are relatively* common all over. My dad owned a home in Indiana that had an LP tank, as did the homes around him for miles in every direction. Many rural areas use LP as running the infrastructure for NG is hugely cost prohibitive for the area covered and number of customers.

The home still had normal electric, phone, internet, etc, but running and pressurizing miles of NG just for 100 or so homes is just not practical.

"While almost 85% of households in the United States heat with natural gas or electricity, more than 10% rely on heating oil or propane"

10% may not sound like a lot, but that's still 1 in 10 homes in the US. Definitely not just off-grid cabins.
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04-07-2020 at 09:32 AM
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04-07-2020 at 09:43 AM
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#9
Quote from VulnoX
:
Really? They are relatively* common all over. My dad owned a home in Indiana that had an LP tank, as did the homes around him for miles in every direction. Many rural areas use LP as running the infrastructure for NG is hugely cost prohibitive for the area covered and number of customers.

The home still had normal electric, phone, internet, etc, but running and pressurizing miles of NG just for 100 or so homes is just not practical.

"While almost 85% of households in the United States heat with natural gas or electricity, more than 10% rely on heating oil or propane"

10% may not sound like a lot, but that's still 1 in 10 homes in the US. Definitely not just off-grid cabins.
Many large subdivisions in Austin have LP for water and heating. Each community has a large tank that serves all of the houses. This became popular because it enabled a way for the the original builder to continue to extract money from home owners after the initial sale.
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#10
Quote from WhosUrBuddiee
:
I have never seen a house use LP for heat unless its an off-the grid cabin or something.
I'm in NE Ohio, and this is common outside of the urban/suburban areas of Cleveland, Akron, Canton, Youngstown, etc. In more rural areas, truck-delivered oil is common for heat and LP is common for stoves and water heaters. This is the case in many other states, too.
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04-07-2020 at 09:54 AM
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#12
I grew up in the Detroit area. Not common. I moved to Northern Michigan. Common.

As far as the unit being advertised for sale, I just put Rheemm 9.5 gallon per minute natural gas indoor unit in myself and love it. I've had it in use about 7 weeks and I wouldn't go back.
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#13
Quote from WhosUrBuddiee
:
I have never seen a house use LP for heat unless its an off-the grid cabin or something.
You must not get out much...
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#14
Quote from VulnoX
:
Really? They are relatively* common all over. My dad owned a home in Indiana that had an LP tank, as did the homes around him for miles in every direction. Many rural areas use LP as running the infrastructure for NG is hugely cost prohibitive for the area covered and number of customers.

The home still had normal electric, phone, internet, etc, but running and pressurizing miles of NG just for 100 or so homes is just not practical.

"While almost 85% of households in the United States heat with natural gas or electricity, more than 10% rely on heating oil or propane"

10% may not sound like a lot, but that's still 1 in 10 homes in the US. Definitely not just off-grid cabins.

In CT, a small state mind you, unless you live in a city proper, you have HHO or LP - some poor souls even have electric. It's somewhat a consideration when buying a house but again unless you live RIGHT IN a city or middle of a town, you're not going to have LP, and electricity is just so damned expensive which it would work, you'd be paying through the nose for it.
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#15
Quote from WhosUrBuddiee
:
I have never seen a house use LP for heat unless its an off-the grid cabin or something.
There's lots of areas of the country that don't have natural gas piped into their homes, mine is one of them. As a matter of fact, I've owned 7 homes over the years and have never had natural gas in any of my houses. But then again, I like to live in the country, not off grid, just in the country.

I used to work in the HVAC industry in Middle New Hampishire. No natrual gas in our area for 60 miles. Most people, if they wanted gas stoves, had to use propane. Just a fact of life.
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