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GeIL EVO POTENZA 16GB (2x8GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 RAM $59.99 + FS @ Newegg, and two more 3200/CL16 options

$59.99
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Newegg has the GeIL EVO POTENZA 16GB (2 x 8GB) 288-Pin DDR4 SDRAM DDR4 3200 (PC4 25600) Desktop Memory [newegg.com] for $59.99 + Free Shipping. NLA

Also available from Newegg via Ebay here [ebay.com]. NLA

Features:
  • DDR4 3200 (PC4 25600)
  • CAS Latency 16
  • Timing 16-18-18-36
  • Voltage 1.35V
Similar GeIL RAM was popular recently for the same price, but only DDR4-3000. Slightly higher clock on this one. This sale ends Fri 5/22.

Other single-stick offerings with DDR4-3200 CL16 timings on Newegg:
  • G.SKILL Ripjaws V Series 16GB 288-Pin DDR4 SDRAM DDR4 3200 (PC4 25600) F4-3200C16S-16GVK .. Single 16GB stick .. for $64.99 + FS from Newegg.com [newegg.com] or Newegg via eBay [ebay.com]
  • Team T-Force Delta RGB 16GB (2 x 8GB) 288-Pin DDR4 SDRAM DDR4 3200 (PC4 25600) TF3D416G3200HC16CDC01 .. Single 16GB stick .. for $69.99 + FS from Newegg.com [newegg.com] NLA
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Joined Apr 2005
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#2
I updated the OP with two viable alternatives with DDR4-3200 speeds and CL16 timings. Singles sticks though, not 2x8.

One is a Ripjaws for $5 more than the Potenza.
Another is a Team T-Force with RGB for another $5 more from that.
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#3
Seems like a good deal given the recent bounce upward in RAM prices, Beware the super tall heat spreaders can possibly interfere with tower style coolers.
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#4
Decent set of RGB RAM sticks. Reviews seem to agree they aren't great for overclocking but are just fine running stock XMP profile settings.

https://www.newegg.com/team-16gb-...gnorebbr=1
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#5
Are single sticks any less better than 2x8?
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#6
Never heard of this brand. Is this a quality brand?
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#7
Quote from JayDee917
:
Never heard of this brand. Is this a quality brand?
Geil been around for a long time. I'd say upper mid-range maybe.
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#8
Quote from lifewillbeok
:
Are single sticks any less better than 2x8?
Yes. Because, you want to capitalize on dual-channel efficiency. So the point of a single stick is to buy 2 sticks laugh out loud (or to fix a situation where you currently have only one).

Details:
Memory controllers on CPUs support multiple (typically two) 64-bit channels of bandwidth which allows data to be sent across more than one channel. The sticks must be matching else at best they will run at the specifications of the slowest module. It doesn't necessarily mean twice the performance benefits. 25-30% is possible in some applications. Depending on the purpose, the actual metric one cares about (like gaming FPS) may be minimally benefited.

2018 benchmarks by PurePC (translated to english [google.com]), comparing single, dual, or quad channel.
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#9
Good memory, had 4 sticks in my pc but had to switch out my cooler because of how tall the memory is.
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#10
Quote from SDBuddy
:
Yes. Because, you want to capitalize on dual-channel efficiency. So the point of a single stick is to buy 2 sticks https://static.slickdealscdn.com/ima...s/emot-LOL.gif (or to fix a situation where you currently have only one).

Details:
Memory controllers on CPUs support multiple (typically two) 64-bit channels of bandwidth which allows data to be sent across more than one channel. The sticks must be matching else at best they will run at the specifications of the slowest module. It doesn't necessarily mean twice the performance benefits. 25-30% is possible in some applications. Depending on the purpose, the actual metric one cares about (like gaming FPS) may be minimally benefited.

2018 benchmarks by PurePC (translated to english [google.com]), comparing single, dual, or quad channel.
So, if a laptop has 1 x 8, and you add matching 2 x 8, will data be channeled across all 3?

What about a total of 4 x 8?


Also, how can you determine whether the memory controller can support multiple channels?
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Last edited by EZ77 May 22, 2020 at 04:25 PM.
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#11
Quote from EZ77
:
So, if a laptop has 1 x 8, and you add matching 2 x 8, will data be channeled across all 3?

What about a total of 4 x 8?
Your specific CPU's on-board memory controller (or in lieu of that, basically for older generations, the motherboard might have the mem controller)... needs to support multiple-channel in a specific configuration. Most CPUs support only dual-channel afaik. You can read the wikipedia page [wikipedia.org] which lists some examples of CPUs supporting triple and quad channel.

So assuming your CPU supports only dual-channel, you're not going to get the performance benefit of adding two more dimms for a total of 3. And if you have 4 sticks, it will still run dual-channel mode only. But, you'll have more capacity.

Quote from EZ77
:
Also, how can you determine whether the memory controller can support multiple channels?
You edited!
Look at the CPU manufacturer's website and specs. Or a third party site or review can give details. Google, basically.

For example, here's info for the Ryzen 5 3600 [wikichip.org]; scroll to the memory controller section.
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Last edited by SDBuddy May 22, 2020 at 04:36 PM.
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#12
Quote from SDBuddy
:
Your specific CPU's on-board memory controller (or in lieu of that, basically for older generations, the motherboard might have the mem controller)... needs to support multiple-channel in a specific configuration. Most CPUs support only dual-channel afaik. You can read the wikipedia page [wikipedia.org] which lists some examples of CPUs supporting triple and quad channel.

So assuming your CPU supports only dual-channel, you're not going to get the performance benefit of adding two more dimms for a total of 3. And if you have 4 sticks, it will still run dual-channel mode only. But, you'll have more capacity.



You edited!
Look at the CPU manufacturer's website and specs. Or a third party site or review can give details. Google, basically.

For example, here's info for the Ryzen 5 3600 [wikichip.org]; scroll to the memory controller section.
Thanks for the info. Great site for chip info. I used it for mine. Says: supports up to 128 GiB of dual-channel.

- So, if I add 2 x 8 to the current 1 x 8, will two of them work in dual channel? Or, because it is an odd number, do I get no dual channel benefits? Also, if having 3 x 8 offers no dual channel benefits, is it better to just get 1 x 16 to go with the 1 x 8?

- If I later add another 1 x 8, will the total 4 x 8 work in pairs of two dual channels?

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#13
Quote from EZ77
:
Thanks for the info. Great site for chip info. I used it for mine. Says: supports up to 128 GiB of dual-channel.

- So, if I add 2 x 8 to the current 1 x 8, will two of them work in dual channel? Or, because it is an odd number, do I get no dual channel benefits? Also, if having 3 x 8 offers no dual channel benefits, is it better to just get 1 x 16 to go with the 1 x 8?

- If I later add another 1 x 8, will the total 4 x 8 work in pairs of two dual channels?
I don't know with certainty but I believe if you put the two matching sticks into the associated slots (typically A2-B2 for your first pair), and the 3rd stick into another slot, the matching pair will be run in dual-channel mode. However, because one of the sticks is of different type, then they will all run at the lowest speed/timings of the three.

Beware if you added a 16GB stick next to an 8GB stick... they are not matching. Even if it was the same brand and general model.. it's a different stick. You won't get dual-channel benefits.

I'm pretty sure that's right but someone else can say otherwise. You're best to take these questions to google, reddit, or other dedicated forums (including a mobo or memory manufacturer forum) for memory support but I'm doing my best to help. Smilie

tl;dr -- best to buy two sticks, once at the start of your PC build (or as a replacement if that's your scenario), and based on your needs for the life of your machine... then you will get the performance and capacity (and price) you desire all at once.
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Last edited by SDBuddy May 22, 2020 at 06:21 PM.
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#14
Quote from SDBuddy
:
I don't know with certainty but I believe if you put the two matching sticks into the associated slots (typically A2-B2 for your first pair), and the 3rd stick into another slot, the matching pair will be run in dual-channel mode. However, because one of the sticks is of different type, then they will all run at the lowest speed/timings of the three.

Beware if you added a 16GB stick next to an 8GB stick... they are not matching. Even if it was the same brand and general model.. it's a different stick. You won't get dual-channel benefits.

I'm pretty sure that's right but someone else can say otherwise. You're best to take these questions to google, reddit, or other dedicated forums (including a mobo or memory manufacturer forum) for memory support but I'm doing my best to help. https://static.slickdealscdn.com/ima...lies/smile.gif

tl;dr -- best to buy two sticks, once at the start of your PC build (or as a replacement if that's your scenario), and based on your needs for the life of your machine... then you will get the performance and capacity (and price) you desire all at once.
I already have 1 x 8. That's why I wasn't sure how best to upgrade to 24 GB total. I will consult with the manufacturer to ensure I match as closely as possible the existing memory. And confirm the correct slots to achieve dual channel for a pair.

Thanks for your responses.
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