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Staples 2-Outlet 1500 Joule Home Entertainment Surge Protector with Coax

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Staples has Staples 2-Outlet 1500 Joule Home Entertainment Surge Protector with Coax (24505) for $5.84. Shipping is free. Thanks Rokket
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Slim design fits easily behind TVs; Up to $75,000 in connected equipment warranty. -StrawMan86

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Staples [staples.com] has the Staples 2-Outlet 1500 Joule Home Entertainment Surge Protector with Coax for $5.84. Shipping is free. Excellent reviews.
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Created 06-07-2020 at 10:58 AM by Rokket
in Surge Protectors & Powerstrips (5)
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True story...I am in central Fla Maybe the lighting capital of the US. My girlfriend's apartment got hit with a vicious lightning storm 15 years ago .All the electronics that were not plugged into the single surge protector I had gotten her for her new Dell PC got toasted. If I remember correctly she lost a couple of TV's , a microwave, and some cordless phones. Her new PC survived. PSA surge protectors wear out eventually, so down here I change them out every 2-3 years for the best protection. I even have my refrigerator plugged into one of these things...
Also a direct strike will get anything, but this is your next best bet....
Noob question.. what are the coax used for?
Generally speaking it's never a good idea to plug in any kind of power hungry device (e.g. a microwave, electric heater or air conditioner) into a surge protector. Most surge protectors aren't able to handle the amount of current they'll draw, which leads to the surge protector over heating, melting down and possibly causing a fire.

Also (again generally speaking) shouldn't be necessary since such devices should have their own built in transient protection on their electronics. Motors, compressors and magnetrons usually aren't as susceptible to surges.

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#3
Do these things really save your devices? I feel like if a lightning strike routes through your lines, it's gonna blow this thing out and anything connected to it.
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#4
Noob question.. what are the coax used for?
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#5
Quote from sal3oos
:
Noob question.. what are the coax used for?
Cable internet? The wire that goes to the modem to give you internet if you don't have fiber
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Quote from lelandt50
:
Do these things really save your devices? I feel like if a lightning strike routes through your lines, it's gonna blow this thing out and anything connected to it.
If you're lucky yes. Mostly, the lower joules units protect you from general spikes in electricity.

A direct lightning strike to your property? Very few things do much against that, but better devices may warrantee equipped / connected devices...
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#7
Quote from sal3oos
:
Noob question.. what are the coax used for?
If you have coaxial lines coming into your home (cable TV, internet) then you route them through this for similiar surge protection. Coax is just an insulated copper wire and similarly vulnerable to surges.
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Quote from ShrewdCrowd1060
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If you have coaxial lines coming into your home (cable TV, internet) then you route them through this for similiar surge protection. Coax is just an insulated copper wire and similarly vulnerable to surges.
I see. I thought coax is low voltage same as data lines
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Quote from sal3oos
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Noob question.. what are the coax used for?
for cable or maybe cable modem.
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#10
Also works if you have an outdoor antenna that plugs into TV.
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Quote from sal3oos
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Noob question.. what are the coax used for?
To clean analog signal dubbing one VCR to another.
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Quote from sal3oos
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I see. I thought coax is low voltage same as data lines
Coax typically doesn't have much of a current, but if a lightning strike were to hit it then it could fry all your connected devices like your cable box or modem.
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Anyone know if these would be safe to use with a small 900-watt microwave oven? Just bought a 2-pack of APC 1440 joules Surge Protectors but I'm afraid to use them with a microwave oven because they're not UL rated.
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#14
How does this compare to ikea's power strip $6 for 2? Ikea is cheaper and has 6 outlets. https://www.ikea.com/us/en/p/kopp...-70086401/
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#15
Quote from JackOfOwls
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Anyone know if these would be safe to use with a small 900-watt microwave oven? Just bought a 2-pack of APC 1440 joules Surge Protectors but I'm afraid to use them with a microwave oven because they're not UL rated.
Generally speaking it's never a good idea to plug in any kind of power hungry device (e.g. a microwave, electric heater or air conditioner) into a surge protector. Most surge protectors aren't able to handle the amount of current they'll draw, which leads to the surge protector over heating, melting down and possibly causing a fire.

Also (again generally speaking) shouldn't be necessary since such devices should have their own built in transient protection on their electronics. Motors, compressors and magnetrons usually aren't as susceptible to surges.
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