Forum Thread

Did I Make a Mistake, or is there a problem with CPU / Motherboard? [Z490 + 10th Gen Intel CPU]

2,038 225 June 14, 2020 at 05:28 AM
I recently built a new system as my old system had issues with its motherboard over time.

Here are the specs in brief,

- 10th Gen Intel Core i7 10700 65W (non-K model)
- Intel Stock CPU Cooler
- Gigabyte Z490 Aorous Ultra ITX Motherboard
- 32GB RAM G.Skill F4-3200C15D-32GVK
- 6GB VRAM EVGA RTX 2060 KO Ultra
- 550 Watts EVGA 80 Bronze PSU
- Fractal Design's Core 500 ITX Case
- 1x Rear Exhaust Fan 140mm
- 2x Top Intake Fans 140mm
- 2x WD Black SN750 NVME SSD's 500GB
- 2x WD 4TB Hard Drives
- 2x Crucial MX500 500GB SSD's
This build in a well ventilated area.


Issue:

While gaming my CPU gets thermally throttled

I ran Intel's XTU utility and noticed that CPU jumps from 65W to 123W during stress tests; the temperature shoots up, and the CPU becomes thermally throttled after a few seconds during the test (100 degrees Celsius)

I sense that the motherboard is not detecting the correct model CPU (although it wouldn't post if that was the case), but by default it mistakenly sensing this 65W TDP CPU as 125W. I had to set the turbo thermal limit 65W in the BIOS and now temperatures are much cooler especially at idle as well as gaming; but now, the CPU get's power throttled as per XTU.

In-spite of this the CPU still passes the stress tests.

Do you all think I may mated the wrong CPU with the motherboard (which is meant for enthusiasts and overclockers)? Or do you think that either CPU or motherboard is defective?

My next option was going for the 10700K and be done with it. Initially I wanted something more power efficient, do it all machine. However, if I need to compromise, then lesson learned, I don't mind the extra premium on the K model if you all say so.

Please let me know, thank you

10 Comments

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Joined Jun 2005
Let Sleeping Dogs Lie
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#2
the 65W is the power usage at the base frequency not the boosted one so 2.9 is 65W 4.8 is max who knows what power it uses then.

I would look at your cooler/thermal past or overall cooling if you can open the case and put it over or in front of an AC duct then see how it works.
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#3
Well you are using a stock cooler...
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#4
Good point, I've heard that Intel's Stock Coolers are notorious for being crap

I just ordered a Noctua today, hopefully that will resolve this. Otherwise, I might just need upgrade to the K-model and keep my fingers crossed. It seems these motherboards are auto-tuned to raise the TDP even on the 65W CPU's which is really annoying.

Quote from crazytimtimtim
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Well you are using a stock cooler...
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#5
Thanks komondor, its funny how Intel doesn't specify the TDP at its boosted frequency. Then they blame motherboard manufacturers for doing harm on their CPU's

Quote from komondor
:
the 65W is the power usage at the base frequency not the boosted one so 2.9 is 65W 4.8 is max who knows what power it uses then.

I would look at your cooler/thermal past or overall cooling if you can open the case and put it over or in front of an AC duct then see how it works.
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#6
I found the number

https://www.tomshardware.com/news...processors

224 Watts!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Home News

Intel Reveals PL1, PL2 and Tau Values For 10th-Gen Comet Lake-S Processors

By Zhiye Liu 05 June 2020

Intel finally lets the cat out of the bag.

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10th Generation Comet Lake-S Processors10th Generation Comet Lake-S Processors (Image credit: Intel)

Intel has released a new revision of the datasheet for its 10th-gen Comet Lake-S processors. The June 2020 edition (PDF) details the PL1 (Power Level 1), PL2 (Power Level 2) and Tau values for the new 14nm chips, information which was not available in the previous revision.

Enthusiasts have often called out Intel for not publicly advertising the peak power consumption for its processors. The chipmaker only discloses the PL1 value, which is the processor's power draw at base clock speeds. The PL2 parameter, on the other hand, is significantly higher since it's the maximum power consumption that you can expect when the processor is pushed to the max with turbo engaged.

In all likelihood, Intel doesn't reveal the PL2 number with the objective of not confusing less experienced buyers. Labeling a processor with 250W would be bad for business, especially when the majority of consumers won't be seeing this level of power draw very frequently during normal usage. Nevertheless, it's a crucial aspect of the processor that should be exposed to the general public so the consumer can plan accordingly when putting a system together.

While we applaud Intel's transparency, it would garner more points with enthusiasts if the chipmaker listed the PL2 value on the ARK product database instead of inside some obscure document that the majority of consumers probably won't find or know of its existence.
Intel 10th Generation Comet Lake-S PL1, PL2, Tau

Processor
PL1 (W) PL2 (W) Tau (Seconds)
Core i9-10900K
125 250 56
Core i7-10700K
125 229 56
Core i5-10600K
125 182 56
Core i9-10900
65 224 28
Core i7-10700
65 224 28
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Original Poster
#7
Interesting, so I've assured that there is proper and adequate ventilation pulling air in and pushing air out in my case. Also disabled XMP profile in the BIOS. It does appear that CPU still thermal throttles in the stress test. Could it be because this CPU is from a lower bin? I don't think the motherboard is defective as I haven't come across anything usual apart from that one time a game crashed while playing (but was played on a dedicated graphics card) and several times when my DisplayPort cable and monitor wouldn't communicate right; I think these a normal gremlins to be expected.

I was able to get my hands on a K-model and Noctua NH-U12A CPU Cooler. That should all the difference.

Some motherboard manufacturers have purportedly been auto-overclocking CPU's without consumer consent.

https://www.gamersnexus.net/guide...your-build

At this point, I'm not sure what else to modify in the BIOS as far as the current non-K CPU in my system goes. I thought the CPU wasn't configurable to begin with in the BIOS since its a locked non-K model. Very puzzling indeed Confused

Quote from komondor
:
I found the number

https://www.tomshardware.com/news...processors

224 Watts!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Tom's Hardware is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more

Home News

Intel Reveals PL1, PL2 and Tau Values For 10th-Gen Comet Lake-S Processors

By Zhiye Liu 05 June 2020

Intel finally lets the cat out of the bag.

Shares
Comments (1)

10th Generation Comet Lake-S Processors10th Generation Comet Lake-S Processors (Image credit: Intel)

Intel has released a new revision of the datasheet for its 10th-gen Comet Lake-S processors. The June 2020 edition (PDF) details the PL1 (Power Level 1), PL2 (Power Level 2) and Tau values for the new 14nm chips, information which was not available in the previous revision.

Enthusiasts have often called out Intel for not publicly advertising the peak power consumption for its processors. The chipmaker only discloses the PL1 value, which is the processor's power draw at base clock speeds. The PL2 parameter, on the other hand, is significantly higher since it's the maximum power consumption that you can expect when the processor is pushed to the max with turbo engaged.

In all likelihood, Intel doesn't reveal the PL2 number with the objective of not confusing less experienced buyers. Labeling a processor with 250W would be bad for business, especially when the majority of consumers won't be seeing this level of power draw very frequently during normal usage. Nevertheless, it's a crucial aspect of the processor that should be exposed to the general public so the consumer can plan accordingly when putting a system together.

While we applaud Intel's transparency, it would garner more points with enthusiasts if the chipmaker listed the PL2 value on the ARK product database instead of inside some obscure document that the majority of consumers probably won't find or know of its existence.
Intel 10th Generation Comet Lake-S PL1, PL2, Tau

Processor
PL1 (W) PL2 (W) Tau (Seconds)
Core i9-10900K
125 250 56
Core i7-10700K
125 229 56
Core i5-10600K
125 182 56
Core i9-10900
65 224 28
Core i7-10700
65 224 28
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Original Poster
#8
I wanted to avoid ASUS because I've heard their technical support can be a hit or miss. Thus I opted for Gigabyte's board, but the experience is far worse than I could ever have imagined. I always had a good experience with them in the past, but this time, they're not responsive nor on call. And here's an interesting note by Gamer's Nexus,

ASUS' Z490 boards are the only ones we've tested that force the users to explicitly choose between MCE or Intel defaults, and default to the Intel recommendations when the board is reset, at least in the BIOS revision that we used for our Comet Lake reviews.

I wonder if going with ASUS was really the way to go. I was quick to return the ASUS board as soon as I heard about its customer service. What's funny is that they gave me technical support on the BIOS side of things even though they knew I was using a Gigabyte board. I should have stayed with ASUS.
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#9
Tech support will always have ups and downs, much like PC MFG some people like Dell others will run from them.

Sometimes the questions we are asking are not really MB related so they struggle, plus with COVID who knows how good the upper levels of support are.

If Intel published the range it would be a lot more helpful. After all running the processor at almost twice the clock speed is going to generate more heat, even if only half the cores are being used I would think.
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#10
Stock cooler def can't unlock the full potential of the 10700. 10700 is a beast chip, just needs a passable cooler ($30+ usually) to use it under medium-heavy loads.
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#11
I don't Intel wants to admit that their CPU Coolers simply suck. vomit

Quote from OracleOfShenzhen
:
Stock cooler def can't unlock the full potential of the 10700. 10700 is a beast chip, just needs a passable cooler ($30+ usually) to use it under medium-heavy loads.
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