Sorry, this deal has expired. Get notified of deals like this in the future. Add Deal Alert for this Item
Frontpage Deal

5TB WD My Passport Portable External Hard Drive (Black) EXPIRED

$100
$149.99
+ Free Shipping
+59 Deal Score
29,552 Views
Amazon has 5TB WD My Passport Portable External Hard Drive (WDBPKJ0050BBK-WESN) on sale for $99.99. Shipping is free. Thanks NightHound

Note: In stock June 23, 2020.
Share
Good deal?
You gave thanks to NightHound for this post.
Thank you!
NightHound posted this deal. Say thanks!

Editor's Notes & Price Research

Written by

Original Post

Written by
Edited June 17, 2020 at 02:46 AM by
Amazon [amazon.com] has 5TB WD My Passport Portable External Hard Drive (WDBPKJ0050BBK-WESN) on sale for $99.99. Shipping is free.

QA note: now in stock June 23, 2020.
If you purchase something through a post on our site, Slickdeals may get a small share of the sale.
Frontpage Deal
$600
+ Free Shipping
78 113
Frontpage Deal
Micro Center
$200
+ Free Curbside Pickup Only
125 245
Frontpage Deal
$1180
+ Free Shipping
67 169
$0.00
4 0
Deal
Score
+59
29,552 Views
$100
$149.99
About the OP
Send Message
Pro Deal Hunter
Joined Oct 2019 Slickdeals Staff Deal Hunter
13,773 Reputation Points
828 Deals Posted
385 Votes Submitted
904 Comments Posted
Don't have Amazon Prime? Students can get a free 6-Month Amazon Prime trial with free 2-day shipping, unlimited video streaming & more. If you're not a student, there's also a free 1-Month Amazon Prime trial available.

79 Comments

1 2 3 4 5

Featured Comments

That's an amusing corruption of advice which has a kernel of truth to it.

Hard drives write data onto a rotating platter (a disk, which is why they're often called hard disks or disk drives). The earliest drives (and floppies) only had a single platter, but manufacturers quickly figured out the easiest way to increase capacity was to add additional platters (called platters to avoid confusion with the entire "hard disk").

A modern drive typically has 1-5 platters, though the higher numbers are usually only seen on drives with extremely high capacity. Each platter has two sides, and each side requires a read/write head to read/write data off of it. If each platter has two R/W heads, then that's an even number of read/write heads.

Occasionally, for market segmentation purposes, a manufacturer will leave a head off of one side. That wastes the space on that side of the platter (can't write data to it), so the drive's capacity is reduced. But if the manufacturer thinks they can make more money selling a reduced capacity drive, then more power to them. A drive gimped this way has an odd number of read/write heads.

So yeah, if you know the drive has an even number of heads, then it's preferable over a drive with an odd number of heads. Since the power consumption and heat generation of the drive scales with the number of platters, you're getting all the drawbacks of a drive with (say) 4 R/W heads, but only the capacity of 3 R/W heads, since they're both 2-platter drives.

Unfortunately, this has nothing to do with the numerical data capacity of the drive, since the amount of data you can squeeze onto one side of a platter usually doesn't fall into integer TB amounts. There are drives with 250 GB/platter, 320 GB/platter, 500 GB/platter, 750 GB/platter, 833 GB/platter, 1 TB/platter, 1.33 TB/platter, 1.5 TB/platter, 1.6 TB/platter, 2 TB/platter, etc. So knowing the capacity is 5 TB doesn't tell you how many platter sides (and thus R/W heads) are in use.

There is a database for number of platters used in each drive model, but it's incomplete and frequently out of date. You can use it, divide the capacity of the drive by the capacity of each platter, and if it's an odd amount you can infer that it's using an odd number of R/W heads.* But frankly it doesn't make that much of a difference unless you're getting to the 4- and 5-platter drive designs (where the extra heat can be a concern). If you're gonna go to this much trouble, it's more useful to find a 1- or 2-platter drive with the same capacity instead of a 3- or 4- or 5-platter drive, rather than worry about even/odd number of heads.

https://rml527.blogspot.com/

Why the * ? Read below.


That won't really help either. All drives come with extra reserve space. They know sectors (a portion of the drive surface capable of holding 4096 bytes of data, 512 bytes in really old drives) will go bad over time. So they include this extra space filled with reserve sectors. If a sector on the drive fails (can't read data written to it after multiple attempts), the drive detects this. It remaps that sector to a reserve sector. From then on, every time you try to use that sector, it uses the reserve sector instead.

So any drive damaged during shipping to the point where it still works but is slowly accumulating errors, will continue to work just fine for a while. Until it runs out of reserve sectors and suddenly dies. Filling it with data once and erasing it won't help detect this. You need to monitor the drive's S.M.A.R.T. stats with a tool like CrystalDiskInfo for several weeks or months. See if the number of used reserve sectors is increasing at an unnaturally high rate.

For the purpose of figuring out how many heads the drive uses, this means a 5 TB drive actually has a bit more than 5 TB of data capacity.
Hard drive manufacturers market drives in terms of decimal (base 10) capacity. In decimal notation, one megabyte (MB) is equal to 1,000,000 bytes, one gigabyte (GB) is equal to 1,000,000,000 bytes, and one terabyte (TB) is equal to 1,000,000,000,000 bytes.

Programs such as FDISK, system BIOS, Windows, and older versions of macOS use the binary (base 2) numbering system. In the binary numbering system, one megabyte is equal to 1,048,576 bytes, one gigabyte is equal to 1,073,741,824 bytes, and one terabyte is equal to 1,099,511,627,776 bytes.

Simply put, decimal and binary translates to the same amount of storage capacity. Let's say you wanted to measure the distance from point A to point B. The distance from A to B is 1 kilometer or .621 miles. It is the same distance, but it is reported differently due to the measurement.

Capacity Calculation Formula

Decimal capacity / 1,048,576 = Binary MB capacity
Decimal capacity / 1,073,741,824 = Binary GB capacity
Decimal capacity / 1,099,511,627,776 = Decimal TB capacity

Example:
A 500 GB hard drive is approximately 500,000,000,000 bytes (500 x 1,000,000,000).

500,000,000,000 / 1,048,576 = 476,837 megabytes (MB) = 465 gigabytes (GB)

5 TB (5,000 GB) ~ 4,657 GB
Not true at all makes zero difference, makes zero sense either. no matter how many gigabytes or terabytes your hard drive is it is never actually that exact number.

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users Show Post
HIDDEN
06-15-2020 at 08:06 AM
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jun 2016
L2: Beginner
48 Posts
14 Reputation
#4
Not too long ago, I was told to never buy an "odd" numbered HD (3,5,7 ect...) is this true?
Need this to store movies and not sure this is the right one...
Any suggestions?
Thanks
2
0
0
3
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Nov 2012
L3: Novice
237 Posts
26 Reputation
#5
Quote from buycars
:
Not too long ago, I was told to never buy an "odd" numbered HD (3,5,7 ect...) is this true?
Need this to store movies and not sure this is the right one...
Any suggestions?
Thanks
Not true at all makes zero difference, makes zero sense either. no matter how many gigabytes or terabytes your hard drive is it is never actually that exact number.
10
0
0
1
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jun 2016
L2: Beginner
48 Posts
14 Reputation
#6
Quote from MrD2K5
:
Not true at all makes zero difference, makes zero sense either. no matter how many gigabytes or terabytes your hard drive is it is never actually that exact number.
Thanks
2
0
0
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Nov 2006
L5: Journeyman
518 Posts
157 Reputation
#7
Double post
1
0
0
1
Reply
Last edited by JSP0421 June 15, 2020 at 11:06 AM.
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Nov 2006
L5: Journeyman
518 Posts
157 Reputation
#8
Quote from MrD2K5
:
Not true at all makes zero difference, makes zero sense either. no matter how many gigabytes or terabytes your hard drive is it is never actually that exact number.
I read once that odd numbered drives are downgraded even numbered drives. Like a 5tb was actually meant to be a 6tb but didn't pass spec so they downgraded it to 5tb to get it to pass.

I have no idea the validity of that but even if it is true it passed QA eventually for the capacity I am purchasing.
0
0
0
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Nov 2012
L3: Novice
237 Posts
26 Reputation
#9
Quote from buycars
:
Thanks
You're very welcome.
0
0
0
0
Reply

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Nov 2019
New User
3 Posts
14 Reputation
#10
2
0
0
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Nov 2010
L10: Grand Master
6,624 Posts
2,038 Reputation
Pro
#11
Very tempted to pick this up for my Shield Pro emulator setup....
0
0
0
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Feb 2017
L2: Beginner
86 Posts
26 Reputation
Our community has rated this post as helpful. If you agree, why not thank ?
#12
Quote from JSP0421
:
I read once that odd numbered drives are downgraded even numbered drives. Like a 5tb was actually meant to be a 6tb but didn't pass spec so they downgraded it to 5tb to get it to pass.

I have no idea the validity of that but even if it is true it passed QA eventually for the capacity I am purchasing.
That doesn't make a bit of sense in this case given that WD doesn't make a 6TB Passport. I don't think they make a 6TB 2.5" drive in general.
4
0
1
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Feb 2017
L2: Beginner
86 Posts
26 Reputation
#13
I bought two of these recently. The best thing you can do is to write 5TB of data to it straight away to reveal any abnormalities if there's going to be any. My primary concern is that both Amazon and BB send drives in a bubble wrap that's hardly bigger than the stock box. My postal carrier threw it on the porch from about a foot off the ground. WTH??
4
0
0
2
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Nov 2012
L3: Novice
237 Posts
26 Reputation
#14
Quote from JSP0421
:
I read once that odd numbered drives are downgraded even numbered drives. Like a 5tb was actually meant to be a 6tb but didn't pass spec so they downgraded it to 5tb to get it to pass.

I have no idea the validity of that but even if it is true it passed QA eventually for the capacity I am purchasing.
Hard drive manufacturers market drives in terms of decimal (base 10) capacity. In decimal notation, one megabyte (MB) is equal to 1,000,000 bytes, one gigabyte (GB) is equal to 1,000,000,000 bytes, and one terabyte (TB) is equal to 1,000,000,000,000 bytes.

Programs such as FDISK, system BIOS, Windows, and older versions of macOS use the binary (base 2) numbering system. In the binary numbering system, one megabyte is equal to 1,048,576 bytes, one gigabyte is equal to 1,073,741,824 bytes, and one terabyte is equal to 1,099,511,627,776 bytes.

Simply put, decimal and binary translates to the same amount of storage capacity. Let's say you wanted to measure the distance from point A to point B. The distance from A to B is 1 kilometer or .621 miles. It is the same distance, but it is reported differently due to the measurement.

Capacity Calculation Formula

Decimal capacity / 1,048,576 = Binary MB capacity
Decimal capacity / 1,073,741,824 = Binary GB capacity
Decimal capacity / 1,099,511,627,776 = Decimal TB capacity

Example:
A 500 GB hard drive is approximately 500,000,000,000 bytes (500 x 1,000,000,000).

500,000,000,000 / 1,048,576 = 476,837 megabytes (MB) = 465 gigabytes (GB)

5 TB (5,000 GB) ~ 4,657 GB
10
0
0
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Nov 2012
L3: Novice
237 Posts
26 Reputation
#15
Quote from uscstyle
:
I bought two of these recently. The best thing you can do is to write 5TB of data to it straight away to reveal any abnormalities if there's going to be any. My primary concern is that both Amazon and BB send drives in a bubble wrap that's hardly bigger than the stock box. My postal carrier threw it on the porch from about a foot off the ground. WTH??
Organization there's no way possible that you can write 5 terabytes worth of data on a five terabyte hard drive. There is always allocated space you're not taking into account for that. Aside from that the WD drives also have manufacturers software taking up space on it. Even if you freshly formatted the drive without manipulating, the space on the hard drive used for your computers cache, memory, and storage bin, you would never reach that goal.
1
0
0
1
Reply
Page 1 of 6
1 2 3 4 5
Join the Conversation
Add a Comment
 

Link Copied to Clipboard