Forum Thread

Recommendations for under cabinet lighting?

1,283 913 June 22, 2020 at 10:50 AM
We are currently renovating our kitchen right now, with new cabinets, counters, and floors. Was thinking about doing some under cabinet lighting. I don't really want to hardwire it to a switch unless it's highly recommended. I see there are tons of different kits that offer a cheap after-installation option. Which ones do you guys use or like? Battery powered is fine because I'm sure it would last awhile, only being on for a couple of hours each evening. Are there options with a timer to set them to turn on from say 6pm - 10pm each day? Is it better to run the string of LED strips, or just the puck styles?

To give you an idea, we have a smaller kitchen, only 11x11ft with an L of cabinets. Thanks!

12 Comments

1

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jul 2003
L10: Grand Master
34,660 Posts
6,164 Reputation
#2
Quote from jordanz12
:
We are currently renovating our kitchen right now, with new cabinets, counters, and floors. Was thinking about doing some under cabinet lighting. I don't really want to hardwire it to a switch unless it's highly recommended. I see there are tons of different kits that offer a cheap after-installation option. Which ones do you guys use or like? Battery powered is fine because I'm sure it would last awhile, only being on for a couple of hours each evening. Are there options with a timer to set them to turn on from say 6pm - 10pm each day? Is it better to run the string of LED strips, or just the puck styles?

To give you an idea, we have a smaller kitchen, only 11x11ft with an L of cabinets. Thanks!
Do it right or don't do it, as you'll just be re-doing it later cause it ain't right.

Battery systems, the little pucks are good for occasional use, but you'll burn through batteries and then it's a drag to change them out and then you won't and thus what's the point of the lights in the first place?

Put in a switch, use the LED strip lights that have the self adhesive backing on them and stick them to the bottom of the cabinets as close to the front as you can.
*this assumes the bottom of the cabinet is higher then the face frame of the cabinet so there is a little bit of the face frame that hangs down lower. This will keep the light going down and to the wall, but not out front and won't be as blinding to the eye when you grab something out of the lower cabinets.

****
On one of the home improvement shows I watch they put this same LED lighting strip INSIDE of the bottom Cabinets so they could actually see in to the back of the cabinet.

So run 2 switches...1 under cabinet for your counter top illumination, and for inside your lower cabinets.
0
0
0
0
Reply
worshipTHANK YOU to those whom have fought and are fighting for our FREEDOMworship

Please Support Autism Awareness [autismspeaks.org]
Yahoo!Yahoo! 7/11/2009
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jan 2012
L6: Expert
1,283 Posts
913 Reputation
Original Poster
#3
Yeah, I think I've ruled out the battery powered units. Even at 100 hours, that's going to be a pain and wasteful to change out every month.

For the strip lights, why not just use a kit like this that plugs into the wall? I have plenty of outlets in the kitchen, and could just plug it into a timer to come on each day (I could hide the timer/plug with some decor). https://www.amazon.com/Lighting-F...r=8-6&th=1

It would avoid the hassle of having to open up the drywall and hard-wire it (which I wouldn't even know where to start with that). Should work the same as what you're describing right?
0
0
0
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jul 2003
L10: Grand Master
34,660 Posts
6,164 Reputation
#4
Quote from jordanz12
:
Yeah, I think I've ruled out the battery powered units. Even at 100 hours, that's going to be a pain and wasteful to change out every month.

For the strip lights, why not just use a kit like this that plugs into the wall? I have plenty of outlets in the kitchen, and could just plug it into a timer to come on each day (I could hide the timer/plug with some decor). https://www.amazon.com/Lighting-F...r=8-6&th=1

It would avoid the hassle of having to open up the drywall and hard-wire it (which I wouldn't even know where to start with that). Should work the same as what you're describing right?
For me, I do know how to wire up an outlet box and I can patch drywall

...but that would work with what you linked to.

my heartburn is that if you are remodeling, then adding the box and the wiring is a lot easier at this point, vs. later should you then change your mind.
0
0
0
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Feb 2007
L10: Grand Master
7,225 Posts
#5
over the range microwave?
0
0
0
0
Reply
for those that hate spelling mistakes www.walmarts.comCool

bulb save money by checking your insurance every 2 years (and not every 20) Thanks Liberty Mutual for reminding me to shop. The $842 increase this year sums it up. Across the board increase for Ohio....whatever
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jan 2012
L6: Expert
1,283 Posts
913 Reputation
Original Poster
#6
Quote from stufine
:
over the range microwave?
Yes I do, why do you ask? Thinking to plug it in through that hole opening to hide the cords? If so that's a great idea!
0
0
0
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Feb 2007
L10: Grand Master
7,225 Posts
#7
Quote from jordanz12
:
Yes I do, why do you ask? Thinking to plug it in through that hole opening to hide the cords? If so that's a great idea!
exactly. some rules require a single outlet but heh..rulesWave
0
0
0
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jan 2012
L6: Expert
1,283 Posts
913 Reputation
Original Poster
#8
We just got our cabinets delivered yesterday and now I'm re-thinking it. The bottoms of the cabinets are flush bottom, there is no inset like our old cabinets. So there would be no way to easily hide the lighting unless we recessed it which would be a pain. Dangit! Is this the new standard for cabinets?
0
0
0
0
Reply

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Dec 2003
Benevolent Dictator
32,003 Posts
3,001 Reputation
#9
I've installed quite a few under cabinet lights in my own home as well as the houses I rehab. I've used different brands, sets, etc. and the ones I like the most are these:


My favorites have been the Torchstar 3000K angled LEDs [amazon.com]. They install at the back wall at the base of the cabinet, they are super easy to install, and the light output is great. With the cabinet type you have, this might be your best bet.



I've also installed a bunch of the tape version from HITLIGHTS also [amazon.com], and I like them okay, but it helps if you are comfortable with soldering those. There are snap-on connector kits [amazon.com] for them also, but I don't find those kits as reliable as just soldering them.


In any case, I figure out a way to wire all my led kits to one switch, regardless of where the cabinets are mounted. I find it annoying to have multiple under cabinet switches all over the kitchen.


That said, in my own home I don't think I've ever turned them off since I installed them back in early 2015. They sip power, and provide a nice night light at night.
0
0
0
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jan 2012
L6: Expert
1,283 Posts
913 Reputation
Original Poster
#10
Quote from The Raddish
:
I've installed quite a few under cabinet lights in my own home as well as the houses I rehab. I've used different brands, sets, etc. and the ones I like the most are these:


My favorites have been the Torchstar 3000K angled LEDs [amazon.com]. They install at the back wall at the base of the cabinet, they are super easy to install, and the light output is great. With the cabinet type you have, this might be your best bet.



I've also installed a bunch of the tape version from HITLIGHTS also [amazon.com], and I like them okay, but it helps if you are comfortable with soldering those. There are snap-on connector kits [amazon.com] for them also, but I don't find those kits as reliable as just soldering them.


In any case, I figure out a way to wire all my led kits to one switch, regardless of where the cabinets are mounted. I find it annoying to have multiple under cabinet switches all over the kitchen.


That said, in my own home I don't think I've ever turned them off since I installed them back in early 2015. They sip power, and provide a nice night light at night.
Thanks for the info! I really like that first type you linked, think I'll probably go with that. That way you can still somewhat hide the light being in the back against the wall. I'm going to have to look into hard wiring them to a switch to see how easy/hard it'll be with my layout. Most of my cabinets are in an L, but there's a cabinet across from the stove, and then just one cabinet on the opposite side of the kitchen past the pantry. I'm not sure what the easiest way is going to be to link them all up together without ripping into drywall.
0
0
0
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Dec 2003
Benevolent Dictator
32,003 Posts
3,001 Reputation
#11
Quote from jordanz12
:
Thanks for the info! I really like that first type you linked, think I'll probably go with that. That way you can still somewhat hide the light being in the back against the wall. I'm going to have to look into hard wiring them to a switch to see how easy/hard it'll be with my layout. Most of my cabinets are in an L, but there's a cabinet across from the stove, and then just one cabinet on the opposite side of the kitchen past the pantry. I'm not sure what the easiest way is going to be to link them all up together without ripping into drywall.
Do you have a 2nd story over your kitchen or an attic? If an attic, wiring them together can be pretty easy, but you have to snake the wire into the drywall behind your cabinets if they don't go all the way to the ceiling. By the same token, if you have a crawl space or basement under your kitchen it's even easier.


Even if you are on a slab and have a story on top of you, it can be done with a little creativity. Also, if you do have to cut drywall, no worries, it is cheap and easy to patch and repair. And your wife might get a freshly painted kitchen out of the deal as well.
0
0
0
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jan 2012
L6: Expert
1,283 Posts
913 Reputation
Original Poster
#12
Quote from The Raddish
:
Do you have a 2nd story over your kitchen or an attic? If an attic, wiring them together can be pretty easy, but you have to snake the wire into the drywall behind your cabinets if they don't go all the way to the ceiling. By the same token, if you have a crawl space or basement under your kitchen it's even easier.


Even if you are on a slab and have a story on top of you, it can be done with a little creativity. Also, if you do have to cut drywall, no worries, it is cheap and easy to patch and repair. And your wife might get a freshly painted kitchen out of the deal as well.
We have a kids bedroom above the kitchen and basement family room below it. So either way I'd have to be cutting through and feeding the wiring. My wife didn't sound too fond of the idea and prefers the "wireless" solution where it's just plugged in to the microwave cabinet. Decisions decisions!
0
0
0
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jul 2020
New User
1 Posts
10 Reputation
#13
Hardwire it to your main switch you will be glad you did
0
0
0
0
Reply
Page 1 of 1
1
Join the Conversation
Add a Comment
 
Link Copied to Clipboard