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Johns Manville R38 Insulation Batt 24"x 48" on sale at Lowes - $39 per box compared to $79 previously. May be local - YMMV

$39.00
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https://www.lowes.com/pd/Johns-Ma...1000165231

R38 Unfaced 24x48 insulation batt - Normal price around $79, for some reason price is at $39 now. It could be a price mistake. This may be a local price so YMMV.

There are a couple others that seem to be less as well:

https://www.lowes.com/pl/Johns-ma...4294961838


I have been looking into adding unfaced R38 batt insulation in my attic for almost the entire summer. I checked today and the price is significantly less than I have seen before. I feel like it could be a price error as there is no advertised sale.

My plan is to use this in the attic, laying it perpendicular across the joists on top of existing loose fill to increase the R Value.
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Created 08-04-2020 at 06:54 AM by Jmunch
in Home & Home Improvement (2)
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#2
87 where im at
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#3
Thanks, I guess it may be regional, YMMV.
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#4
Same here, reg price.

FWIW & IMO laying down batt insulation seems like a lot more work than blowing in fiberglass.
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#5
Quote from Nrkeene
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Same here, reg price.

FWIW & IMO laying down batt insulation seems like a lot more work than blowing in fiberglass.
My blown in is all condensed/flattened now after 15 years... that has me thinking batts are better
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#6
Quote from MtnXfreeride
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My blown in is all condensed/flattened now after 15 years... that has me thinking batts are better

While in my attic I found the builder's insulation installer bent the ruler they attach to show how deep the loose fill is at the 4" mark, so I was getting R-whatever at 6 inches instead of the advertised R30 at 10".
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#7
You won't be getting R-value listed on the package. Any air movement (think attic venting and temperature variations) lessens the R-value of fiberglass insulation. Cellulose is much better for this application.
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Quote from shortprong
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You won't be getting R-value listed on the package. Any air movement (think attic venting and temperature variations) lessens the R-value of fiberglass insulation. Cellulose is much better for this application.

But if you're laying flush against the loose fill, assuming it is relatively flat, what air movement would there be?
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Quote from shortprong
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You won't be getting R-value listed on the package. Any air movement (think attic venting and temperature variations) lessens the R-value of fiberglass insulation. Cellulose is much better for this application.
Also have to be careful about putting cellulose too thick because of weight. I believe the general rule is only blow fiberglass on top of existing for that reason but I'm just a DIYer
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#10
Quote from shortprong
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Cellulose is much better for this application.
Cite that please
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#11
$39.11 in ZIP 15601. Also eligible for energy rebates. The weird thing is they don't stock it but I can have it shipped to store. Min order qty is 4.
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#12
Quote from PedroR
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Cite that please
Google it. Cellulose is superior. Stops air flow. Fire resistant. More green. Higher r value. Cheaper. Etc etc etc
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#13
From the OP's second link, if you buy a quantity of 15 you get another 30% off . R38 16x46" Faced https://www.lowes.com/pd/Johns-Ma...-L/3172829
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#14
39.11 in 32401 if anyone is looking
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#15
Quote from 00dahc
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Google it. Cellulose is superior. Stops air flow. Fire resistant. More green. Higher r value. Cheaper. Etc etc etc
All insulation must meet the same fire code, however cellulose must incorporate fire retardant since it's ground up newspaper, whereas fiberglass is simply glass, and inherently non-flammable.

Cellulose achieves higher R per inch due to increased density, but also suffers from settling and increased weight per square foot.

Costwise, they are very similar, which is why they both exist in a highly commoditized marketplace.

They each have tradeoffs, but to say that one is superior is a bit extreme.

I've designed insulation products for a couple decades and have worked on pretty much all of them. Just my preference, I put fiberglass in my houses.

Happy to discuss further if you have questions as to why.
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